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What's New during 2019

 

Empowering women in search and rescue operations

15/11/2019 

Training for African women working in search and rescue (SAR) operations is underway at the Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Rabat, Morocco (13-15 November). Thirteen officials* from developing countries and Small Island Developing States took part in the first regional training course of this kind.

The course included a practical exercise on a rescue boat and provided a platform to discuss how to improve and enhance the knowledge of African women working in SAR and to provide them with appropriate tools to manage SAR missions.

IMO, together with the International Maritime Rescue Federation (IMRF) and the Government of Morocco, supported the course, the latest in a series of events this year which fully support the  World Maritime theme  "Empowering Women in the Maritime Community".

*Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Republic of the Congo, Senegal, Seychelles and South Africa.

 

Understanding fouling

15/11/2019 

Mediterranean countries are undergoing IMO training on the impacts of anti-fouling systems and ships’ biofouling on the marine environment at a workshop in Valletta, Malta (12-14 November). The event is raising awareness of IMO’s Anti-Fouling Systems (AFS) Convention and Biofouling Guidelines – what it means to implement them, and, in the case of the AFS Convention, the requirements and benefits of ratification and enforcement. 

Biofouling is the build-up of aquatic organisms on a ship’s underwater hull and structures. It can be responsible for introducing potentially invasive non-native aquatic species to new environments and can also slow a ship down and impact negatively on its energy efficiency. Anti-fouling paints are used to coat the bottoms of ships to prevent biofouling. The AFS Convention, which has been in force for more than ten years, prohibits the use of harmful organotins in anti-fouling paints and establishes a mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in anti-fouling systems.

Fifteen participants from 8 countries* are taking part in the workshop, which included a site visit to a dry dock. During the visit, participants witnessed practical examples of niche areas and other exposed underwater parts of the hull of a ship that are important for biofouling management, including the effective application of anti-fouling systems.

The workshop, co-organized and hosted by REMPEC, is part of efforts under the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships Project, which aims to establish regional partnerships and cooperation agreements to address marine biofouling issues.

* Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, Spain, and Tunisia

 

Norway boosts IMO's GreenVoyage-2050 GHG project

13/11/2019 

​Partnerships and innovations are essential to combat climate change through reductions in GHG emissions. Norway has provided an additional NOK 40,000,000 (US$4.3. million) to the IMO-Norway GreenVoyage-2050 project, which will support GHG reductions in line with the IMO initial strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from shipping. This supports UN SDG 13 on climate action. The project aims to assist countries to implement legal, policy and institutional reforms, build capacity and initiate and promote global efforts to demonstrate and test innovative technical solutions for reducing GHG emissions from shipping. IMO is currently in the process of selecting pioneer pilot countries, new pilot countries, partner countries, industry partners and strategic partners at national, regional and global levels.

The new tranche follows an initial funding of NOK 10,000,000 (US$1.1. million) for the project, provided earlier this year. 

Meeting with IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim to sign the agreement for additional funding (13 November), Mr Sveinung Oftedal, Specialist Director of the Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment, said, "Norway is very pleased to enhance our financial commitments to support IMO's efforts to build capacity and to provide technical assistance to support the IMO initial GHG strategy. We will continue our efforts to further support the GreenVoyage-2050 project, considering the importance of this project to achieve the goals of the IMO GHG strategy."

IMO is involved a range of partnerships which contribute to sustainable development and reflect UN SDG 17 (partnerships). Other IMO-executed global projects supporting the reduction of GHG emissions from shipping include the Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA),  under the auspices of the GEF-UNDP-IMO Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships Project (GloMEEP Project)  the Global Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre Network (GMN) project, funded by the European Union and implemented by IMO.  

 

Tackling invasive aquatic species in Jordan

12/11/2019 

Biofouling is the build-up of aquatic organisms on a ship's underwater hull and structures. It can be responsible for introducing potentially invasive non-native aquatic species to new environments and can also slow a ship down and impact negatively on its energy efficiency.

A two-day workshop was held in Aqaba, Jordan (11 to 12 November) to raise awareness of the problem and the impact it is having along the Jordanian coastline. Participants discussed a wide range of topics including biofouling as a pathway for non-indigenous species and approaches on how biofouling should be controlled and managed to minimize the transfer of invasive aquatic species through ships' hulls. 

Amongst the participants were representatives of various maritime sectors, including marina ports and civil society organizations, including the Arab Women In Maritime Association (AWIMA).

Participants agreed on the establishment of a National Task Force as well as the creation of a communication platform for all its members, which will be key in defining a national policy on biofouling and invasive species. They agreed to draft a national strategy and action plan to implement the IMO Biofouling Guidelines.

The next step for the GloFouling Partnerships in Jordan will be to develop national baseline reports to assess the current situation regarding non-indigenous species and biofouling management practices.

The workshop was co-organized and hosted by the Jordan Maritime Commission. It is part of efforts under the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships Project, which aims to establish regional partnerships and cooperation agreements to address marine biofouling issues.


 

IMO launches online tool to smooth reporting formalities

11/11/2019 

​Streamlining the many administrative procedures necessary when ships enter or leave port is an important element of IMO's work. And now, an important tool used by software developers to create systems for exchanging the relevant data electronically has been made available by the Organization online and free of charge.

The IMO Compendium is a reference manual containing data sets and the structure and relationships between them, that will enable the IMO Member States to fulfil a mandatory obligation (in place since April 2019) for the reporting formalities for ships, cargo and people on board international shipping to be carried out electronically and in a harmonised way.

Overall this helps make cross-border trade simpler and the logistics chain more efficient, for the more than 10 billion tons of goods which are traded by sea annually across the globe.

IMO is not the only organization dealing with electronic data exchange in maritime transport. But others, notably the World Customs Organization, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe and the International Standards Organization, have aligned their own data structures with the IMO Compendium to promote harmonization.

Click here to access the new, free IMO Compendium online.

 

Skilled, ambitious and increasingly visible – maritime women profiled

07/11/2019 

​"Women bring intelligence and high skills to all fields of the shipping industry – let’s throw off the bowlines!”. This is the message from Port Captain Basak, one of the latest maritime women being featured by IMO under this year’s World Maritime theme: “Empowering women in the Maritime Community”.

Women from across the globe are giving an insight into their work, aspirations, how IMO’s Women in Maritime Programme has supported them – and their top tips for current and aspiring female maritime professionals.

The latest profiles include a Port Infrastructure Technician from El Salvador, a Student Support Officer from the Seychelles, and a Ghanaian Senior Marketing and Corporate Affairs Officer – Ms Flavia Amoasi.

Ms Amoasi praised the Women in Port Management Course that she took part in, with sponsorship from IMO, in Le Havre France, saying that it “afforded me the opportunity to share my experiences and learn from best practices in port management globally”.

The featured profiles can be viewed and downloaded here. IMO encourages all those involved and interested in the maritime community to share these stories, to increase visibility of the role that women play in a sector that is so essential to the world.

 

South Africa trained on oil spill response

07/11/2019 

With important maritime traffic and offshore oil and gas exploration and production off the coast of South Africa, there is increased risk of an oil spill occurring, which poses a threat to the marine environment and wildlife.

Improving the efficiency, effectiveness and management of emergency response operations for both governments and industry alike is a key element in minimizing environmental and socio-economic impacts of oil spills.

To address this, a two-day Incident Management System Training Course was held in South Africa (6-7 November) to help participants test their National Oil Spill Contingency Plan and deepen their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of various stakeholders and entities in preparing for and responding to oil spills.

More than 60 South African delegates from governmental and industry bodies attended the event which was hosted by the Ministry of Transport and and its agency, the South African Maritime Safety Agency (SAMSA), in cooperation with the Ministry of environment, forests and fisheries under the operation Phakisa.

This IMO activity was carried out within the framework of the Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF), a partnership between IMO and IPIECA, with the goal to enhance the capacity of GI WACAF countries to prepare for and respond to marine oil spills.

For 13 years, the Project has been supporting its partner countries, helping to build the skills necessary to support their development.



 

Cooperation to boost maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea

06/11/2019 

Cooperation and capacity-building are two key ways in which IMO and the wider global community are seeking to support countries to reduce the number of incidents.  IMO attended the annual plenary meeting of the countries and organizations members of the G7 Group of Friends of the Gulf of Guinea (G7++ FoGG) in in Accra, Ghana (5-6 November) on invitation of the Franco-Ghana co-chair and with the support of the European External Action Service (EEAS).

During this meeting, participants took stock of the progress made in the implementation of the Code of Conduct concerning the prevention of piracy, armed robbery against ships and illicit maritime activity in West and Central Africa (the Yaoundé Code of Conduct) which was signed in 2013. They also promoted cooperation amongst all stakeholders and heard updates from five virtual working groups which were established in July to focus on legal issues; financial aspects; maritime domain awareness; training; and blue economy. 

The G7++ FoGG group is open to all interested Member States, NGOs and IGOs. 

IMO also attended the annual Gulf of Guinea Chiefs of Naval Staff Symposium (7 November) held under the auspices of the Ghanaian Navy. Participants saw cooperation in action, on board the French Navy Ship Somme, which was participating in Exercise Grand African Nemo. The French Navy-led exercise bought together 19 Gulf of Guinea countries, eight European countries and involved five assets, with 30 exercises covering how to deal with various maritime crimes and incidents at sea.  

 

Protecting seas and coasts in Africa

06/11/2019 

​Designating an IMO Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) is a recognition that the identified area may be vulnerable to potential impacts of international shipping. In a PSSA, associated protective measures can be proposed and adopted, such as ship routeing systems, for example, areas to be avoided by ships or no-anchoring areas. But first, the area needs to be identified. A sub-regional workshop in Nosy-Be, Madagascar (5 -7 November) is helping participants from Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, South Africa and the United Republic of Tanzania, to identify potential marine areas that could be designated as PSSAs. 

Marine areas may be designated a PSSA if they fulfil a number of criteria, including: ecological criteria, such as unique or rare ecosystem, diversity of the ecosystem or vulnerability to degradation by natural events or human activities; social, cultural and economic criteria, such as significance of the area for recreation or tourism; and scientific and educational criteria, such as biological research or historical value.

The workshop is focusing on enhancing awareness about PSSAs; identifying the current status of protected areas and maritime shipping activities within the region, in particular the Mozambique Channel, and discussing and agreeing on areas which might be considered PSSA candidates. The workshop is facilitated by the Agence Portuaire Maritime et Fluviale from Madagascar, in collaboration with IMO. 

IMO's work on PSSAs fully supports the achievement of the UN SDG 14 on the oceans. To date, 17 PSSAs have been designated (including two extensions). 

 

Graduates from IMO maritime university take centre stage

05/11/2019 

Future maritime leaders from more than 70 countries graduated this week (3 November) from IMO’s World Maritime University (WMU) in Malmö, Sweden.

WMU was founded in 1983 by IMO as a centre of excellence for maritime postgraduate education, research, and capacity building. It offers unique postgraduate educational programmes, undertakes wide-ranging research in maritime and ocean-related studies and helps build maritime capacity in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Quality education is itself one of the SDGs – SDG 4.

The graduating class of 2019 comprises 250 Graduates from 79 countries, approximately a third of whom are women. There were 131 MSc graduates from the Malmö headquarters, 42 graduates from the China programme, three PhD graduates and 74 graduates from the various distance learning programmes. The class of 2019 brings the total number of WMU graduates to 5,167 from 170 countries.

IMO Secretary-General and WMU Chancellor Kitack Lim is the first WMU graduate to hold these positions. At the graduation ceremony, he highlighted the profound impact WMU had on his life and noted the responsibility the graduates now have as they return to their home countries. He said “I urge every one of you to assume ownership and shoulder your part of the responsibility of moving the world forward in a sustainable manner and leaving no one behind. You are now in the enviable position of having the knowledge and the power to turn ideas into reality. This will improve our lives, benefit our countries, our regions, and our planet.”

For a full report and photographs of the ceremony, click here.

 

Cutting shipping emissions needs innovation

05/11/2019 

“If we want shipping to increase, but emissions to peak at the same time, then ships must become much, much more efficient than they are today.” Opening a regional workshop organized by the Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre (MTCC) Africa, hosted by the Seychelles, Alan Renaud, Principal Secretary for Civil Aviation, Ports & Marine, Seychelles, set the scene. “It will require innovation, new ways of thinking, new technologies,” Mr. Renaud said. 

The MTCC is part of the Global MTCC Network (GMN) Project, implemented by IMO and funded by the European Union. The 2nd regional workshop (28 october-1 November) provided an opportunity for updates on the project in the region, including ongoing pilot projects, such as data collection relating to energy efficiency of ships and ports.  

Representatives from 26 countries agreed a number of important recommendations for future work, including incorporating a concept of “green ports” into the work of MTCC Africa. Recognizing the need to support UN SDG 5 on gender equality, the workshop agreed to encourage states to involve women in the implementation of initiated pilot projects, to reach at least 40% female participation in each pilot project of the MTCC-Africa and in capacity building programmes.

The Maritime Technology Coorporation Centre for Africa (MTCC Africa) is hosted by the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), Mombasa CBD Campus, in partnership with Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA) and Kenya Ports Authority (KPA).

 

Going the extra nautical mile for vessel safety

04/11/2019 

IMO’s most important ship safety treaty – SOLAS – provides for safe merchant shipping, covering a wide variety of topics, from ship construction to fire protection, to life-saving appliances and cargo carriage. SOLAS generally applies only to ships above a certain size which make international voyages, but IMO’s efforts to improve ship safety go further – extending to so-called “non-SOLAS” vessels. These include fishing vessels, domestic ferries, private yachts and small cargo vessels under 500 gross tonnage.

To help enhance safety of such vessels in Central and South America, IMO organized a regional training course on non-SOLAS ship inspections, held in San Salvador, El Salvador (28 October – 1 November). Participants from six countries* received training on how to unify national criteria on maritime safety, maritime security and pollution prevention.

The course was organized in collaboration with Prefectura Naval Argentina (PNA), implemented by IMO’s Regional partner The Central American Commission of Maritime Transport (COCATRAM) and hosted by El Salvador.

* Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.

 

Training to enhance maritime security in Qatar

01/11/2019 

Maritime and port security officials from Qatar and Oman have undergone IMO training at a workshop in Doha, Qatar (27-31 October). The focus of the training was on enhancing maritime security by conducting effective self-assessments and audits, in line with the applicable provisions of IMO's International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and relevant IMO guidance.

This includes Guidance on Voluntary Self‐Assessment by SOLAS Contracting Government and by port facilities (MSC.1/Circ.1192), designed to aid IMO Member States in conducting internal audits and to verify that port facility security plans and associated measures are implemented effectively.

The participants* taking part in the training were primarily officials from the Designated Authority (DA), Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs) and managers, and representatives from across government departments involved in maritime security.

The workshop included a visit to the Port of Hamad, organized by IMO and the Government of Qatar. IMO also visited a training centre for coast and border security, where future technical cooperation between IMO and the centre was discussed.

* Forty-four participants from Qatar, two from Oman, including Ministry of communications and Transport, Ministry of interior, Customs, Navy and several other port operators.

 

National maritime security strategies promoted in the Caribbean

01/11/2019 

A national maritime security strategy can help bring together all agencies and government departments and stakeholders with an interest in maritime security, to ensure that the country is ready to address all potential maritime security threats. A regional maritime security workshop (30-31 October) in the Caribbean brought together senior government officials from seven countries * in the eastern Caribbean to kickstart a programme which should see all seven develop their own national maritime security strategies. The intention is to develop, in addition, an overarching Eastern Caribbean regional maritime security strategy, under the auspices of the Organisation of American States (OAS) and the Regional Security System (RSS) - a regional security grouping representing, and with staff drawn from, the seven countries.

IMO supported the regional workshop, which included sessions explaining how safeguarding the maritime domain and the blue economy of the Eastern Caribbean is critical to the region's stability and economic prosperity. A key message was that development and security go "hand-in-hand", since there can be no sustainable development without security, sustainability and peace in the region.

IMO will be working with OAS and the RSS to facilitate further workshops, in 2020, including on risk assessment methodology. IMO will also assist countries in the region and the RSS in identifying and exploiting opportunities to raise the level of maritime security across the region.

* Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Commonwealth of Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

 

Cooperation for oil spill preparedness in west, central and southern Africa

01/11/2019 

Major oil spills today are rare and oil tanker accidents have reduced. But coastal nations need to be prepared in case of emergency. In order to supplement national capacity, bi-lateral, multi-lateral and international cooperation and assistance in spill preparedness and response is crucial. This was highlighted during the eighth Regional Conference of the Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF), in Cape Town, South Africa (28-31 October).

The GI WACAF project is a collaboration between IMO and IPIECA to strengthen oil spill response capacity in west, central and southern Africa. It helps to support mutual cooperation and assist countries to develop capacity for oil spill response. The region covered includes important oil producing States, such as Angola and Nigeria, and is also vulnerable to significant volumes of maritime traffic.     

The conference heard that during the past two years, some 16 national and sub-regional activities, have been implemented, covering many different aspects of oil spill preparedness and response. They included a transboundary oil spill response exercise involving Angola and Namibia in August 2019. Engagement and collaboration with other entities involved in oil spill preparedness has been a hallmark, to ensure a coordinated and consistent approach. Many delegates were keen to explore the possibility of undertaking further spill response exercises with neighbouring countries to try to better understand and address the challenges likely to arise during an actual incident. 

Delegates also agreed on the need to push forward with the effective implementation into national legislation, in all countries in the region, of relevant IMO conventions relating to oil spill preparedness and response, such as the International Convention on oil pollution preparedness, response and cooperation (OPRC), as well as those relating to liability and compensation from pollution damage, including the treaty covering liability and compensation from pollution damage from fuel oil (Bunkers Convention).

The GI WACAF project has been running for 13 years and has encouraged the development of a network of focal points and experts on spill response and preparedness matters in the region.

The Conference was organized by IMO and IPIECA, the global oil and gas industry association for advancing environmental and social performance, in close collaboration with the Government of the Republic of South Africa, particularly the Department of Transport and its agency, the South African Maritime Safety Agency (SAMSA). It brought together key government and industry representatives from the 22 African partner countries of the GI WACAF project:  Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Cabo Verde, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Equatorial Guinea, Liberia, Mauritania, Namibia, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Africa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Togo.

 

Global biodiversity project passes new milestones

01/11/2019 

Marine biodiversity is under threat from invasive aquatic species, but IMO is leading a major global project to combat that threat and find solutions to this major problem. And that project has just passed two major milestones as two more countries, Indonesia and Mexico, have formed their national task force to take part in the initiative.

The project, GloFouling Partnerships, is a joint initiative between the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and IMO. It will help developing countries to tackle invasive aquatic species transferred through so-called biofouling – on ships’ hulls and on other marine structures.

IMO led workshops in both Indonesia and Mexico during October to discuss technical aspects of the problem and the countries’ own institutional arrangements for engaging with GloFouling. The workshops brought together the several different stakeholders that would participate in the national task forces. As well as national maritime and environmental authorities, the task forces will include industry representatives, universities, academics and research institutions. The workshops included overviews of the threats posed by invasive species and biofouling and looked at existing regulatory frameworks and the essential elements for developing national policies.

The GloFouling Partnerships project has 12 Lead Partnering Countries. Indonesia and Mexico have joined Fiji, Tonga, Brazil, Madagascar, Mauritius and Philippines as those which have already established their national task forces. Jordan, Sri Lanka, Peru and Ecuador will join in the coming months.

The next step for GloFouling Partnerships in Mexico and Indonesia will be to develop national baseline reports to assess the current situation with regard to non-indigenous species. Currently-available research on the subject will be identified and the economic impacts determined, leading to informed policy decision-making.

 

Training towards a sustainable Blue Economy for Africa

01/11/2019 

Placing maritime activity at the heart of national development plans in Africa will help deliver the Sustainable Development Goals, which is a key strategic direction for IMO. A recent IMO training activity in Nairobi, Kenya is helping to do just that.

With 38 of 54 African countries being coastal States – and more than 90% of Africa’s imports and exports being transported by sea, Africa’s future depends on healthy oceans and a sustainable Blue Economy. This inclusive, clean and green approach to harnessing maritime resources is central to a new training course being developed in Kenya with support from IMO.

A pilot session on the ‘Strategic Maritime Security and Blue Economy Course’ for senior Kenyan government officials is taking place (28 October – 1 November) at the International Peace Support Training Centre. The course includes an IMO-run module dealing with Blue Economy policy development, through which participants are learning to explain the current state, dynamics and role of policy decision makers in developing and implementing Blue Economy policies.

During the week, participants were challenged to answer a number of key questions. Is the biggest challenge the failure to appreciate the value of the maritime sector? Is it fair to say that many African countries do not have a strong maritime culture? If so, how do we change that?

The module places a focus on the need for all government agencies, military and civilian, to support a national and regional effort rather than operate departmentally. Participants are also asked to consider the current and potential role of women in the maritime community, with IMO’s Women in Maritime Programme slogan: “training, visibility, recognition” underpinning discussions.

It is envisaged that once completed, the course will be rolled out to wider audiences across the continent.

 

Protecting maritime communications

29/10/2019 

Terrestrial and satellite radiocommunications are essential for routine communications and navigation and for ensuring the effective operation of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS), to protect lives at sea. IMO is at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-19), in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, (28 October - 22 November) with the message that the integrity of maritime radiocommunication services needs to be protected.

The use of radio spectrum allocated to existing (and future) maritime radiocommunication services must be safeguarded.

An important item on the WRC-19 agenda is to support the introduction of the Iridium satellite system in the GMDSS, by taking regulatory measures by 1 January 2020, to ensure full protection and availability of the frequency bands to be used by Iridium for the provision of GMDSS services.

Other important items, among others, are the regulation of autonomous maritime radio devices, and modifications of the Radio Regulations to include new spectrum allocations to the maritime mobile satellite service to enable a new VHF data exchange system (VDES) satellite component. 

Read more about Maritime communications - safeguarding the spectrum for maritime services in an article by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim in the ITU News magazine (p.68).

 

Expanding communication tools for Mediterranean pollution incidents

29/10/2019 

Pollution response can be faster and more effective when there is an established emergency communications and emergency system. Mediterranean Countries recently met at a regional workshop held in Brussels, Belgium (22-23 October), to explore the set-up of a common emergency communication system for marine pollution incidents that connects the entire Mediterranean region.  During the event, representatives from 12 Mediterranean countries* received training in the European Union's Common Emergency Communication and Information System for Marine Pollution from ships and off-shore units (CECIS).

The participants, responsible in their countries for preparedness for and response to accidental marine pollution, also explored how CECIS, which currently covers EU Member States, could be further developed as a regional emergency communication tool connecting all Mediterranean countries. 

They agreed that a proposal should be prepared by the Western Mediterranean Region Marine Oil and HNS Pollution Cooperation (West MOPoCo) Project. The proposal will be submitted to the 2021 Focal Points Meeting of the IMO-administered Regional Marine Pollution Emergency Response Centre for the Mediterranean Sea (REMPEC).

The workshop was organised by REMPEC in collaboration with the Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations of the European Commission (DG ECHO). 

* Albania, Algeria, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Egypt, France, Israel, Malta, Montenegro, Morocco, Spain, Tunisia and Turkey.

 

Ban Ki-moon: all hands on deck for UN SDGs and climate action

28/10/2019 

​Beating climate change and achieving the targets set in the United Nations Sustainable Development Agenda are the two defining challenges of our time, according to former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who warned against rising unilateralism. "In times of increasing discord, I believe that achieving the UN SDGS and meeting the Paris Climate Change Agreement are two efforts that should unite all nations, all industry and all civil society," Mr. Ban said, addressing an audience of representatives of IMO Member States, NGOs and IMO staff at IMO Headquarters in London (28 October).  

Mr. Ban lauded IMO's work on climate change, including the adoption of the initial IMO GHG strategy, as well as the Organization's work, including capacity building, to promote a safer, more secure and more environment-friendly shipping industry. "Taking stock of the current realities of global development and climate change, I believe IMO and shipping industry are well positioned to help navigate us toward safer harbours," Mr. Ban said. 

IMO's focus on empowering women through its 2019 World Maritime theme and ongoing gender programme was singled out for praise by Mr. Ban, who himself established UN Women to champion gender equality during his time as UN Secretary-General. Companies with women on their boards do better, he reminded the audience – while women and children are disproportionately affected by the impacts of poverty, climate change and conflict. 

IMO's commitment to supporting the ocean goal, SDG 14, including its work to address marine plastic litter, was also highlighted. Shipping itself is vital to world trade and development – and the achievement of many SDGS. With 11 years to go to fulfil the goals set out in all 17 SDGS, "we need an all hands on deck approach where everyone joins together in multi stakeholder partnership," Mr. Ban said. "Considering the great importance of the shipping industry for our economies and the environment, IMO truly represents the vanguard of global efforts to build a more prosperous and sustainable global future." 

Click for photos

 

Joining forces to combat IUU fishing

28/10/2019 

Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing refers to fishing which is carried out without proper authorization. This can undermine national, regional and global efforts to conserve and manage fish stocks and result in poor safety and working conditions for fishers. Tackling the issue requires collaboration by all stakeholders. A Joint Working Group of three UN agencies – the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) - met in Torremolinos, Spain, to address IUU fishing (23-25 October).

The group recommended the three organizations promote and support the development of ways to increase coordination and information sharing for inspection procedures at national level. Capacity building efforts were highlighted, with a recommendation to share information and experience for a potential integrated capacity-building and technical cooperation programme on IUU fishing and on promotion of relevant international instruments, in particular, among training institutions such as the World Maritime University, the World Fisheries University, the IMO International Maritime Law Institute and the ILO International Training Centre.

The 4th FAO/ILO/IMO Joint Working Group meeting on IUU Fishing and other related matters met in Torremolinos, Spain, with representatives from States and other organizations, including IGOs and NGOs. Recommendations will be submitted to relevant bodies of FAO, ILO and IMO. Read full summary here.

The JWG met following the Ministerial Conference on Fishing Vessel Safety and Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing (21-23 October). The conference, organized by IMO and the Government of Spain, promoted ratification of the Cape Town Agreement, the key IMO treaty for safety of fishing vessels. Entry into force of the Cape Town Agreement is expected to contribute to the fight against IUU fishing by providing a global mandatory regime for fishing vessel safety.  Read more here.

 

Spotlight on extreme maritime weather

28/10/2019 

An IMO-World Meteorological Organization symposium on extreme maritime weather has highlighted the need for the gap to be closed between met-ocean (meteorology and oceanography) information providers and the users of this information in the maritime industry. 

The first ‘Symposium on Extreme Maritime Weather: Towards Safety of Life at Sea and a Sustainable Blue Economy’, held at IMO Headquarters, London (23-25 October) brought together over 200 stakeholders from across the shipping sector. These included participants from freight, passenger ferries, cruise liners, the offshore industry, ports and harbours, coast guards, insurance providers and the met-ocean community.

Global examples of extreme maritime weather and a wide variety of related issues were discussed. These included insurance, investigation and indemnity, ocean forecasting to improve decision making by maritime sectors, digital delivery of maritime safety information, decision support in polar regions from short to longer term seasonal time scales, voyage route optimization, decision support for the offshore industry, and search and rescue.

Find out more about the event, here.

Click for photos.

 

Spain, IMO sign MoU to promote technical assistance

24/10/2019 

Spain and IMO have signed a Memorandum of Understanding on technical cooperation activities to support capacity-building activities in English and Spanish-speaking countries. These activities will support  implementation of IMO regulations, raise awareness of IMO's mandate and contribute to sustainable maritime transport and the implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The MoU covers a wide range of technical cooperation areas, including: search and rescue; maritime training and the human element; passenger ship safety; maritime communications and navigation; fishing vessel safety; port reception facilities; casualty investigation; air pollution reduction; oil and chemical pollution response; maritime legislation; maritime single window; liability and compensation regime.; flag, port and coastal State jurisdiction; framework and Procedures for the IMO Member State Audit Scheme; and national maritime transport policies.

The MoU was signed by Mr. Benito Nuñez Quintanilla, the Director-General for Merchant Marine, and IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim, during the Torremolinos Ministerial Conference on Safety of Fishing Vessels and Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported Fishing (21-23 October). The MoU replaces and updates a previous one signed in 2009.

 

Dealing with waste - the importance of port reception facilities

24/10/2019 

​Port reception facilities are a vital piece of the puzzle when it comes to implementing IMO's MARPOL convention for the prevention of pollution from ships.  A regional workshop in Lima, Peru, (21-23 October) has put the focus on port reception facilities in Latin America. Participants from 16 countries * learned the best way to effectively implement MARPOL Annex V on prevention of pollution from ships by garbage and gained knowledge of best practice in port reception facilities.

The Regional workshop on Port Reception Facilities was organized by IMO and the General Directorate of Captaincies and Coastguards of the Republic of Peru (DICAPI), with the collaboration of Prefectura Naval Argentina (PNA) and the General Directorate for Maritime Terrritory and Merchant Marine of Chile (DIRECTEMAR) and was co-sponsored by the Ministry of Transport of Malaysia.

*Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela.

 

Recognising women in fisheries, increasing visibility

22/10/2019 

Women play a significant role in the fishing supply chain, processing, smoking, and ensuring fish reaches markets and tables. Yet their contribution is often overlooked. “Women play key roles in fisheries around the world. To ignore those roles is to see only half the picture,” said IMO’s Juvenal Shiundu, during a side event on Women in Fisheries at the Torremolinos Ministerial Conference on safety of fishing vessels in Torremolinos, Spain (21-23 October). “Available data does not capture the multidimensional nature of the work undertaken by women in fisheries and few policies are developed with women in mind,” Mr. Shiundu said. To address the lack of visibility of women in fisheries, IMO has undertaken an online raising-awareness initiative under the hashtag #WomenInFisheries including an online photowall.

Speakers at the event highlighted good examples of work being done to support women in fisheries, including organization into networks and associations to give them a stronger voice as well as training. The Hon Emma Metieh Glassco, Director General, National Fisheries and Aquaculture Authority, Liberia, highlighted practical steps to increase visibility of women in fisheries, including organizing fishmongers’ associations and practical training on salting of fish and using improved smoking ovens (a project supported by Iceland).

Ms. Cherie Morris, representative of the Women in Fisheries Network, Fiji, said the network was working to give women in fisheries a voice at community level. The network has also secured funding to collect data. The importance of, and the need for, data was echoed by several speakers, including Dr. Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry, President, World Maritime University (WMU). “We need to produce data and research on fishing - on fishers and the role that they play and from there look at how we can lift them from poverty,” Dr. Doumbia-Henry said. Current estimates suggest that about 40 million are engaged in fishing, with only 15% being women. Further research and data collection are necessary to set a benchmark or baseline of the current situation. But women play an important role in small scale fisheries in developing countries, often making up the majority of the people involved. Speakers also emphasized the need to combat illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing. This has to include a bottom up approach, including and involving the women at the shore side part of the fisheries supply chain. Further work is needed, to build partnerships, to achieve greater inter-agency collaboration between IMO-FAO-ILO to improve visibility and recognition of women in the fisheries sector and to support the organization of women in fisheries into networks.

Also speaking at the event were: Jane Njeri Grytten, General Manager, Pweza Fishing Operations Management Ltd, Kenya; Maria del Mar Saez Torres of the Spanish Network of Women in the Fisheries Sector (REMSP); Alicia Mosteiro Cabanelas, Fisheries Officer, FAO (Moderator); Christine Bader, ILO; and Helen Buni, IMO (Facilitator). 

The event was organized by IMO and the Government of Spain and sponsored by The Ministry of Transport of the People's Republic of China.

Click for photos.

 

Cook Islands, Sao Tome and Principe accede to Cape Town Agreement, more than 45 declare support

21/10/2019 

The Cook Islands and Sao Tome and Principe have become the latest States to become Party to the Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety. They deposited their instruments of accession during the Torremolinos Ministerial Conference on Fishing Vessel Safety and Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing (21-23 October).

Both countries joined more than 40 other countries signing the Torremolinos Declaration, a non-legally binding political instrument. By signing the Declaration, the States publicly indicate their determination to ensure the Cape Town Agreement reaches entry into force criteria by the tenth anniversary of its adoption (11 October 2022). (Photos.) 

The ministerial conference is being held to push forward ratification and entry into force of the Cape Town Agreement, to bring in mandatory safety measures for fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over.

The treaty will enter into force 12 months after at least 22 States, with an aggregate 3,600 fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over operating on the high seas have expressed their consent to be bound by it. With the latest accessions, 13 countries have ratified the Cape Town Agreement: Belgium, Congo, Cook Islands, Denmark, France, Germany, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa and Spain.

The Hon. Henry Puna, Prime Minister of the Cook Islands, deposited the instrument of accession for Cook Islands. HE Eng. Francisco Martins dos Ramos, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Rural  Development, Sao Tome and Principe, deposited the instrument of accession for Sao Tome and Principe.

Countries signing the declaration pledged to take action so that the entry-into-force criteria of the Cape Town  Agreement are met by the target date of 11 October 2022, the tenth anniversary of its adoption; and to promote the Agreement, recognizing that the ultimate effectiveness of the instrument depends upon the widespread support of States, in their capacities as flag States, port States and coastal States. They also denounced the proliferation of IUU fishing, recognizing that international safety standards for fishing vessels will provide port States with a mandatory instrument to carry out safety inspections of fishing vessels, thereby increasing control and transparency of fishing activities.

The Declaration is open for further signatures until 21 October 2020. 

The Torremolinos Conference is co-hosted by IMO and the Government of Spain, with the kind support of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and The Pew Charitable Trusts. It is being attended by more than 500 participants from 148 delegations, including more than 30 Ministers. Read more here. The Conference will close on Wednesday (23 October) with the adoption of Conference resolutions.

 

Safe fishing, legal fishing: conference pushes ratification of Cape Town Agreement

21/10/2019 

The loss of life on fishing vessels remains unacceptably high – but the ratification and entry into force of the Cape Town Agreement, a key international treaty on fishing vessel safety, could have a significant positive impact, saving lives at sea. A Ministerial Conference (21-23 October) has opened in Torremolinos, Spain, to garner momentum towards entry into force of the Agreement. This will also help to combat illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing.

Opening the Conference, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim recalled that the first international regime to address fishing vessel safety had been adopted in Torremolinos in 1977, with a follow up Protocol adopted in 1993, but had not entered into force. The Cape Town Agreement of 2012 will provide the updated mandatory regime for fishing vessel safety. “Back in 1977, in this very hall, the journey towards a mandatory international safety regime for fishing vessels began.  After more than 42 years, IMO and its Member States have returned to Torremolinos to give the final push, to bring a binding international regulatory regime for fishing vessel into force,” Mr. Lim said. The high level of participation at the conference showed a strengthened commitment to bringing the Cape Town Agreement into force.

Later on Monday, States will be invited to sign the Torremolinos Declaration, a non-legally binding political instrument for States to publicly indicate their determination to ratify the Cape Town Agreement by the tenth anniversary of its adoption (11 October 2022). The Conference will close on Wednesday (23 October) with the adoption of Conference resolutions..

The Torremolinos Conference is co-hosted by IMO and the Government of Spain, with the kind support of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and The Pew Charitable Trusts. It is being attended by more than 500 participants from 148 delegations, including more than 30 Ministers. Read more here. The conference will be followed by a meeting (23-25 October) of the Joint FAO/ILO/IMO Working Group on IUU Fishing.

The 2012 Cape Town Agreement is an internationally-binding instrument. The Agreement includes mandatory international requirements for stability and associated seaworthiness, machinery and electrical installations, life-saving appliances, communications equipment and fire protection, as well as fishing vessel construction. The 2012 Cape Town Agreement is aimed at facilitating better control of fishing vessel safety by flag, port and coastal States.

Click for photos.

 

Maritime and port security support for Indonesia

18/10/2019 

Indonesia is the latest country to benefit from IMO support to increase maritime and port security. The first dedicated maritime security workshop in the country for several years took place in Bali (15-18 October) building on a regional event, run by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and IMO, on maritime counter-terrorism legal frameworks earlier this year.

Over thirty participants from Indonesia’s Directorate General of Sea Transportation, harbour master and port authorities, Directorate of Sea and Coast Guard and private companies attended the workshop. The training focused on two key IMO maritime security instruments – SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.

Participants were trained in how to apply provisions in these instruments. Topics including how to assess maritime security risk and how to develop, maintain and supervise implementation of the port facility security assessment, survey and plan, were covered.

The event was run under IMO’s Technical Cooperation Programme, with support from experts from the UK’s International Maritime Security Operations Team, Department for Transport, and observers from the United States Coast Guard.

Find out more about IMO’s maritime security work, here.

 

New audit leaders at the ready

18/10/2019 

Auditing IMO Member States to assess how effectively they administer key IMO instruments is an important part of the Organization’s work to create a regulatory framework for the shipping industry that is universally adopted and implemented.

To support this process, new audit team leaders were trained under IMO’s Member State Audit Scheme (IMSAS) at a course held at IMO Headquarters, London (14-17 October). The course involved thirteen auditors* who had been part of audit teams under the Scheme between 2016 and 2019 and are now ready to act as audit team leaders in future audits.

The training addressed an increased demand for audit team leaders to conduct up to 25 audits of Member States per year, which became mandatory from January 2016 and are carried out in accordance with the overall audit schedule. The course has been designed to further develop skills in preparing, conducting and reporting from audits in accordance with the Framework and Procedures for the IMO Member State Audit Scheme (resolution A.1067(28)) and using the IMO Instruments Implementation (III) Code (resolution A.1070(28)) as the audit standard.

The course is the third to take place since the introduction of the Audit Scheme. All Member States are required to undergo a mandatory audit within the 7-years audit cycle – in accordance with the Scheme and to-date, 72 mandatory audits have been carried out.

On conclusion of the training course, a two-day Auditors’ Meeting was held (17-18 October) for IMSAS auditors and audit team leaders – the first such meeting since the Scheme became mandatory in 2016. The meeting, attended by 36 participants from 29 Member States, provided a forum for the auditors to interact and share their unique audit experiences under IMSAS, with a view to further harmonize and improve those practices going forward, including through a revision of the current “Auditors Manual”. In addition, IMO collected feedback and suggestions for further improvements in administering the Scheme.

* Auditors nominated by: Argentina, Belgium, Ecuador, France, India, Liberia, Mauritius, Morocco, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, United States of America and Uruguay.

 

Progress in combatting illicit ship pollution in the Mediterranean

18/10/2019 

A proposed “Blue Fund” to help combat illicit ship pollution in the Mediterranean is set to be studied by States and stakeholders working to protect the Mediterranean marine environment.

This was agreed at a meeting of the regional network for law enforcement officials of the Mediterranean, known as MENELAS* - organized by REMPEC, the IMO-administered pollution emergency response centre in the Mediterranean.

The meeting in Valletta, Malta (15-16 October) involved 13 Contracting Parties to the Barcelona Convention (12 Mediterranean coastal States and the European Union) as well as 5 regional and international organisations.

Participants discussed new administrative and judicial cooperation tools, such as the harmonisation of pecuniary sanctions (penalties) for illicit ship pollution discharges among countries in the Mediterranean. They shared experiences in effective law enforcement practices and agreed to continue work on a draft common marine oil pollution detection/investigation report. They also agreed to review existing applicable sanctions at national level with regard to illicit ship pollution discharges, and to prepare a draft decision applying criteria for a common minimum level of fines for each offense provided for under the Annexes to IMO’s MARPOL treaty.

* Mediterranean Network of Law Enforcement Officials relating to MARPOL within the framework of the Barcelona Convention (MENELAS)


 

Fuels of the future to decarbonize shipping

18/10/2019 

Ammonia and hydrogen are promising potential fuels of the future in a decarbonized shipping industry, which has to switch to alternative, zero carbon fuels in order to meet the targets set out in the initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships, an IMO symposium on sulphur 2020 and alternative fuels heard on Friday (18 October).

Setting the scene, IMO's Edmund Hughes said the initial GHG strategy, adopted in 2018, had sent a clear signal that shipping will need to adapt. "We have to change to address global climate change," he said. "We have to find new technologies and new fuels if we are to achieve at least 50% reduction in annual GHG emissions from international shipping by 2050." For individual ships, the targets set mean an 85% reduction in CO2 emissions per ship. Operational and technical measures can contribute, including port time optimization and technologies which can be used on existing ships, with examples including air lubrication and wind propulsion to improve operational energy efficiency.

"The long-term future is a hydrogen-based fuel of some sort," said Dr. Tristan Smith, Reader, UCL Energy Institute. The potential for hydrogen- and ammonia-based fuels to take over from fossil fuels for ship engines by 2050 was echoed by Mr. Tore Longva, Principal Consultant, DNV GL; and Ms. Alexandra Ebbinghaus, Maritime Strategic Project Lead, Shell Trading and Chair, GloMEEP-Global Industry Alliance. Key issues for these new fuels include speed of uptake and scaling of production.

Maalaysia's Kanagalingam T. Selkvarasah, Maritime Attache, outlined Malaysia's commitment to developing hydrogen as a fuel for marine use and outlined the infrastructure and projects already in development.  Hydrogen was already being successfully deployed in numerous small vessels and had the potential to be scaled up, said Madadh Maclaine, of the Zero Emission Ship Technology Association.   

Speakers agreed that enabling policies, collaboration and research and development would be needed to decide how shipping would move forward with decarbonization - with a commitment to ensuring that no one was left behind, through collaboration and technical cooperation. "The shipping industry stands ready to move," Johannah Christensen, Managing Director & Head of Projects & Programmes, Global Maritime Forum (GMF) - Getting to Zero Coalition, adding that the shipping sector benefited from having a global regulator to define and shape policy, the IMO.  

Closing the Symposium, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim reflected on the topics of the symposium, which offered a chance for multiple stakeholders to share views on the sulphur 2020 limit which comes into effect form 1 January 2020, and the longer-term need to address climate change and decarbonize shipping.

"The topics of the last two days have a common element, which is essential to sustainable future shipping - and that is fuels," Mr. Lim said. "The development and provision of viable alternative fuels cannot be solved by the shipping industry alone - but needs support from the wider maritime industry, such as oil industries, charterers and ports." 

 

Better together – international organizations unite at IMO

17/10/2019 

IMO is the only United Nations agency based in London but the city itself is home to the headquarters and country offices of many other international organizations. Together, these form a group called the All London Based International Organizations.

Although they deal with a host of different topics, ranging from maritime safety to molecular biology, there are many issues that unite them – for example, a high proportion of overseas staff and their families, living away from their home countries. The member organizations meet annually to discuss these and other matters and this year it was the turn of IMO to host (17 October).

Twenty-seven London-based organizations took part in the annual meeting, which featured as guest speaker Mr. Alistair Harrison CMG CVO, Marshal of Her Majesty's Diplomatic Corps. He raised the importance of so-called ‘multi multilateralism’, in which organizations proactively engage with each other and the local diplomatic corps.

Speaking at the opening of the meeting, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said it was a privilege to be the only United Nations agency to have its headquarters in London and called for continued cooperation and sharing of best practises among the participants.

Click for photos.

 

Enhancing maritime security in Maldives

17/10/2019 

The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS) is a mandatory instrument addressing the safety and security of ships, ports, cargo and crew. It contains detailed security-related requirements for governments, port authorities and shipping companies to ensure preventive measures can be taken if a security threat is determined.

Maldives has become the latest country to receive maritime security training from IMO on the ISPS Code, specifically for its Designated Authority (DA) and Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs).

A three-day workshop, concluding today in Male, Maldives (13–17 October) has provided participants with the knowledge necessary to perform their duties in accordance with the requirements of the IMO maritime security measures in SOLAS Chapter XI-2, including the ISPS Code and related guidance.

The workshop covered many issues surrounding maritime security and including a role-playing exercise in which a port facility security assessment was enacted.

The workshop brought together representatives from Maldives Transport Agency, Coast Guard, Police Service, Customs Service, Immigration Service, State Trading Organization, ship owners and several ports operators.

It was organized by IMO and the Government of Maldives, under the auspices of IMO's Global Maritime Security programme.

 

Maritime policy for sustainable development

16/10/2019 

Developing a national maritime transport policy is key for a country’s sustainable development, especially those with a significant maritime sector. The latest IMO national workshop to familiarize government ministries and agencies with the formulation process and contents of national maritime transport policies has been held in Santiago, Chile (14-16 October).

The workshop aimed to raise awareness of the importance of a national maritime transport policy, as outlined in an IMO video and IMO/WMU training package. The development of such a policy for Chile would complement the country’s national ocean policy, with a view to providing a long-term sustainable vision for the future of the maritime sector whilst reflecting Chile’s broad strategic, economic and social objectives.

The workshop was organised in cooperation with the Ministry of Transports and Telecommunications  and the Dirección General del Territorio Marítimo y de Marina Mercante (DIRECTEMAR). Some 20 participants attended. The workshop was delivered by representatives from IMO, the World Maritime University (WMU) and DIMAR, Colombia.

 

IMO workshop helps put maritime development in Africa’s mainstream

12/10/2019 

​Sixteen countries* from eastern and southern Africa have resolved to make the maritime sector a central component of their national development plans, following a workshop organised by IMO in Nairobi, Kenya (8-9 October).

The countries adopted a five-point resolution under which they agreed to feature maritime matters in their United Nations Sustainable Development Cooperation Framework (UNSDCF) which will determine their national priorities for financing and support.

They also agreed to work with the United Nations Resident Coordinators and the United Nations Country Teams to ensure that the maritime sector and in particular, its national technical assistance needs, are reflected in their respective UN Cooperation Frameworks. National Authorities will contribute to the work of the United Nations Sustainable Development Group (UNSDG) to develop and include key performance indicators that will be used to determine the success of maritime technical cooperation activities.

The resolution recognized the work of IMO's Technical Cooperation Division and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) on developing the “Blue Economy” and the use of the Blue Economy Policy Handbook for Africa to help formulate policy.

Placing maritime activity at the heart of national development plans in Africa will help deliver the Sustainable Development Goals, which is a key strategic direction for IMO.

The workshop was hosted by the Government of the Republic of Kenya, through its State Department for Shipping and Maritime Affairs.

*Angola, Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania

 

Perfecting port management and efficiency

11/10/2019 

An intensive training on port management and operational efficiency was delivered to high-level officials and decision-makers from maritime and port authorities around the world. The annual five-week course, delivered by the Institut Portuaire d’Enseignement et de Recherche (IPER), concluded on 11 October in le Havre, France.

The 33rd Advanced Course on Port Operations and Management welcomed 19 participants from 19 countries. Seven of these participants were women.

The course includes class-based training and site visits. Lectures were delivered in French and English on a variety of ports matters, including shipping and port economy, port organization, ship call operations and management, port security, port technology and information systems, port works and maintenance, port marketing and port environment. IMO delivered a presentation on getting ports closer to IMO.

The Course was sponsored, among others, by IMO, the French port Administration and the Port and Maritime Union of Le Havre.

*Algeria, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Jamaica, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, United Republic of Tanzania and Togo.

 

UK’s counter-terrorism work in focus

11/10/2019 

IMO's rules and regulations for suppressing unlawful acts against the safety of navigation can be seen in the wider context of the global fight against terrorism. The United Nations Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (UNCTED) carries out assessment visits to countries to assess their compliance with various international security instruments and UN Security Council resolutions.

IMO took part in a follow-up visit to the United Kingdom (7-11 October) together with experts from Interpol, the World Customs Organization and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, particularly to assess the country's implementation of the special maritime security measures in IMO's SOLAS chapter XI-2, the ISPS Code, as well as the SUA Convention and Protocols. Topics covered included movement of goods and persons, law enforcement, legal and criminal justice matters, countering the financing of terrorism, and countering violent extremism.

The UNCTED assessment visits are carried out on behalf of the UNSC Counter-Terrorism Committee. The visits allow the Committee to monitor, promote and facilitate Member States’ implementation of relevant Security Council resolutions and international counter-terrorism instruments. This is done through information sharing on good practices and existing initiatives, and, where necessary, by facilitating technical assistance to enhance counter-terrorism capacity in UN Member States.

 

Mexico sets high priority on IMO legal conventions

11/10/2019 

The maritime authorities of the Government of Mexico have agreed to place a high priority on ratifying three important IMO legal conventions, following a workshop in Mexico City.

Mexico has said it will work towards ratifying the 2003 Fund Protocol, the 2001 Bunkers Convention and the 2007 Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention. It will also consider accession to the 2010 HNS Convention. The Governments of Guatemala and Honduras expressed similar intent.

Both the Fund Protocol and the Bunkers Convention deal with compensation following oil spills from ships. Together with the 1992 Civil Liability and Fund Conventions, to which Mexico is already a State Party, they provide a framework to ensure that funds are available to compensate spill victims while, at the same time, establishing limits of liability. The Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention provides the legal basis for States to remove shipwrecks that may put the safety of lives and the marine environment, as well as goods and property at sea, at risk.

While all these three measures are in force and therefore legally binding on all countries that have ratified them, the 2010 HNS Convention is not yet in force. Among the criteria that have to be met for this to happen, at least 12 states have to formally ratify it. So, far, just five have done so. The HNS Convention will establish a compensation and liability regime covering accidents involving hazardous and noxious substances.

Mexico confirmed its commitment to these measures at the conclusion of a marine environment seminar (4 October) organised by P&I Services Mexico, an insurance organization. Several international organizations, including IMO, were on hand to explain the benefits of ratifying the conventions and offer advice and assistance.

 

Safely handling dangerous goods

11/10/2019 

​To transport dangerous goods in packaged form and solid bulk by ship safely, a variety of important measures must be applied. These include correct identification, classification, packaging, labelling, handling, storage, loading, stowage, unloading and transport.

These measures are covered by IMO’s International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG) and the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargo Code (IMSBC) – the subject of an IMO training workshop underway in San José, Costa Rica (7-11 October).

The training is enabling participants from a number of Central and South America countries* to improve their understanding of the codes and to improve implementation and good practices in applying the measures.

The workshop is organized by IMO in collaboration with Prefectura Naval Argentina, run by IMO’s Regional partner The Central American Commission of Maritime Transport (COCATRAM) and hosted by the Maritime Authority of Costa Rica.

* Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama

 

GloFouling – signature event highlights environmental concerns

11/10/2019 

The GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships project has concluded its inaugural Research and Development Forum and Exhibition on Biofouling Management, in Melbourne, Australia (1 to 4 October).

Bringing together experts, regulators and industry representatives to discuss the latest advances in research, regulations and technologies related to marine biofouling across all maritime sectors, this is set to become the project’s biennial “signature event”.

Over 170 participants and 40 speakers took part in a programme (photos) that focused on how biofouling affects different maritime industries, including shipping, aquaculture and ocean renewable energies, and the role it plays in transferring non-indigenous species and pathogens.

A session on biofouling regulations and requirements saw discussion among representatives from Australia’s Department of Agriculture, New Zealand’s Ministry of Primary Industries, the US Environment Protection Agency, Transport Canada, the Maritime Authority of Chile and the California State Lands Commission. Other sessions included national perspectives from developing countries, discussions on how vessel biofouling can be a pathway for transmission of pathogens, biofouling risks in the offshore petroleum industry, and the latest research with regard to vessel efficiency and drag penalty due to hull roughness. 

Participants in an Industry panel chaired by the World Ocean Council highlighted the role that private sector and industry associations should play in the development of regulations. Other key aspects were also considered, such as the barriers for implementing regulations and how the private sector shares the environmental concerns related to the transfer of invasive species.

More information on the event can be found on the GloFouling Project website and proceedings will be published in November 2019 in the GloFouling Knowledge hub.

 

Tough measures against maritime crimes

11/10/2019 

Ensuring that trade and travel by sea are as secure as possible is a key element of IMO's work and mandate. IMO took part in the Global Maritime Security Conference held in Nigeria (7-9 October) to look at maritime security challenges in the Gulf of Guinea as well as potential solutions to address maritime threats in the region.

IMO's Assistant Secretary-General Lawrence Barchue, speaking on behalf of IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim, highlighted that incidents of piracy and armed robbery in the waters off West Africa has the highest reported rate globally and it has become an established criminal activity of very serious concern. He said that "IMO will assist its Member States in enhancing their ability to address maritime security challenges and continue to support the implementation of the Yaoundé Code of Conduct".

Under the theme "Managing and Securing our Waters" over 80 nations were represented at the event which covered more than eleven thematic panels ranging from maritime governance to technology deployment and regulatory issues.

A list of recommendation was adopted to boost the capacity of maritime security stakeholders and move to end maritime insecurity in the region. 


 

Looking at barriers to transboundary carbon capture and storage

07/10/2019 

​Carbon capture and storage under the seabed is recognized as one tool in climate change mitigation. An IMO treaty, the London Protocol, provides the basis in international environmental law to allow CO2 storage. This week, a proposal to agree the early application of an amendment to allow sub-seabed geological formations for sequestration projects to be shared across national boundaries will be put before Parties to the London Protocol (LP) and its forerunner, the London Convention (LC). This would remove a barrier for countries which wish to make use of carbon capture and storage - but which do not have ready access to offshore storage sites within their national boundaries. Parties to the LC/LP treaties are at IMO Headquarters in London for their annual meeting (7-11 October).

The meeting will be asked to consider adopting a resolution to allow early application of a 2009 amendment which aims to permit CO2 streams to be exported for CCS purposes (provided that the protection standards of all other LP requirements have been met). The amendment is not yet in force. If the resolution is adopted this week, it would allow provisional application and therefore the possibility of export of CO2 for sub-sea storage between Parties who deposit a declaration – ahead of the formal entry into force of the amendment.  

The LC/LP meeting will also be urging States which have not done so to accept the 2013 amendment to the London Protocol which provides for the regulation of marine geoengineering activities. Marine geoengineering practices have been put forward as potential tools for countering climate change. The London Protocol prohibits the dumping of wastes and other matter at sea except for those on a short list, for which permits must be sought. Currently all marine geoengineering activities are prohibited with the exception of ocean fertilization and that is limited to 'legitimate scientific research'. A high level review of marine geoengineering techniques was published earlier this year and the report will be presented to the meeting.   

Among other items on the agenda this week, the meeting will look at how the London Convention and Protocol can continue to support the IMO Action Plan to Address Marine Plastic Litter from Ships, particularly as it relates to  plastic litter that may end up in waste materials being assessed for dumping at sea.  The meeting is also expected to approve Revised Specific Guidelines for assessment of platforms or other man-made structures at sea, including updates to ensure the guidelines relating to recycling are compatible with the IMO requirements set out in the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships. Progress in addressing the disposal of fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) vessels will also be reviewed.  

The 41st Consultative Meeting of Contracting Parties to the London Convention and the 14th Meeting of Contracting Parties to the London Protocol was opened by IMO Director Hiroyuki Yamada on behalf of Secretary-General Kitack Lim. The chair is Mrs. Azara Prempeh (Ghana). (Photos here).

 

Demonstration ships delivering data for better energy efficiency in Asia

07/10/2019 

Fifteen demonstration ships in the Asia region have, to date, provided 68,517 sets of data relating to ship fuel consumption and ship optimum trim. It is this kind of data-gathering and analysis that is helping the regional Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre (MTCC-Asia) deliver on its commitment to promote innovative technologies and operations to improve energy efficiency in the maritime sector. MTCC-Asia - one of the centres in the IMO-led, European-Union funded Global MTCC Network (GMN) project  - held its Second Regional Workshop in Yangon, Myanmar (30 September-2 October).

The data gathering project (which took data from five container ships, five bulk carriers and five oil tankers) was just one aspect of MTCC-Asia's work presented during the workshop. Collecting ship fuel consumption data has helped prepare ships in the region for the mandatory data collection required by IMO - and can help inform a ship master's decision-making to improve energy efficiency on board. Ship trim optimization advocates selecting the trim condition for reduced resistance. Less resistance implies fewer emissions and more economical operation by fuel savings. The ship trim relates to the floating position in length – whether the bow or aft of a ship is deeper in the water.

Around 70 participants from 14 countries in the Asian region attended the workshop, including maritime and energy efficiency specialists. They shared presentations and discussed the centre's progress in delivering technology innovation, capacity building, regional outreach, exchange and communications. Sharing knowledge and best practices were highlighted as crucial ways to help improve energy efficiency in the maritime sector. The workshop concluded by acknowledging the importance of the MTCC global network, ahead of the 3rd GMN International conference, which brings together all five MTCCS and meets 7-11 October in Malmö, Sweden.

The Myanmar workshop was organized by MTCC-Asia, funded by the European Union and implemented by the International Maritime Organization, Shanghai Maritime University, Ministry of Transport of China, and Department of Marine Administration of Myanmar.

 

Future maritime leaders learn policy

03/10/2019 

​IMO's World Maritime University (WMU) trains future maritime leaders, many of whom will be involved with formulating maritime policy in their home countries. To assist them, a three-day seminar on maritime transport policy is being delivered to students following the MSc in Maritime Affairs (2-4 October). Maritime transport policy formulation is being promoted by IMO as a good governance practice, to guide planning, decision making and legislation in the maritime sector, and a key driver for a country's sustainable development. Students will end the seminar with a a practical group exercise, drafting and presenting a policy document, encompassing the key aspects of a maritime transport policy.

IMO has been offering National Maritime Transport Policy training to Member States, on request, since 2015 and has developed related videos. An IMO official was on hand to deliver this first-ever specialised WMU seminar on maritime transport policy to the MSc Maritime Affairs students.

 

Implementing IMO emissions rules

03/10/2019 

​What are the barriers to implementing IMO regulations to cut emissions from ships and how can these be overcome? These were key questions explored during an IMO regional workshop on effective ratification and implementation of MARPOL Annex VI and the  initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships, held in Viña del Mar, Chile (30 September-2 October). 

Participants identified existing barriers preventing ratification of MARPOL Annex VI, such as concerns about associated costs for the refinery industry and ship owners, and identified ways to overcome these barriers, building on the experience of those four countries (out of the 12 attending) that have already ratified MARPOL Annex VI. MARPOL Annex VI contains regulations to limit air pollutants form ships, notably sulphur oxides – the limit for sulphur in fuel oil will be cut to 0.50% from 1 January 2020. Annex VI also contains rules for improved energy efficiency of ships, to reduce GHG emissions.

The participants agreed recommendations to support further ratification and implementation of MARPOL Annex VI in the Latin American region. They also agreed to cooperate further on a regional basis, notably with regard to port State control inspections relating to provisions in MARPOL Annex VI.

 An European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) representative trained the participants on preparing for an effective enforcement of the global 0,50% sulphur limit, making use of the various guidelines developed by IMO and the extensive experience with enforcement of low sulphur requirements in European Emission Control Areas (ECAs).

 Possible ways for the maritime sector in the region to contribute to further reductions of greenhouse gas emissions were outlined by a representative from the United Nations' Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEPAL). Chile will host the forthcoming Santiago climate change conference (COP 25). 

 The workshop was hosted by DIRECTEMAR, supported by the Government of Malaysia,  and attended by participants from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela.

 

Maritime security training for Trinidad and Tobago

27/09/2019 

Trinidad and Tobago is the latest IMO Member State to receive maritime security training. A self-assessment and audit training workshop took place in in Port of Spain, Trinidad (23-27 September).

Participants were trained in self-assessing how two key IMO maritime security instruments – SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code – are implemented at the port facility level. This is done using established, industry-standard IMO and ISO procedures to identify areas for improvement.

The course addressed outcomes of a previous workshop on ISPS Code responsibilities delivered by IMO in Port of Spain last year.

The workshop included theoretical lessons for participants to understand the certification process involved in obtaining the Statement of Compliance of a Port Facility, presentations on audit processes and techniques, and practical exercises on role playing the review of a port facility security plan.

 

Updating Thailand's oil spill preparedness plan

27/09/2019 

Supporting countries to prepare for contingencies is an important part of IMO's capacity building work. Thailand is the latest country to benefit from IMO assistance to update its oil spill contingency plan at a National Workshop on National Contingency in Bangkok (24-27 September).

Thirty-five participants from 15 government entities and oil and gas  companies learned about the latest international best practices, and developments, in the field of oil spill preparedness and response and identified areas of improvement in their existing national plan.

The workshop was organized under the framework of the Global Initiative project for South East Asia (GI SEA), a joint project with the oil and gas industry (IPIECA). This supports implementation of IMO's Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (the OPRC 90 Convention).


 

Benefits of maritime single window highlighted in Georgia

26/09/2019 

The maritime single window enables all information required by public authorities in connection with the arrival, stay and departure of ships, people and cargo, to be submitted electronically via a single portal, without duplication. This system is recommended by IMO's Facilitation (FAL) Convention, to make cross border trade simpler. Officials from various port and shipping stakeholders involved in the stay and departure of ships in the ports of Georgia have had the opportunity to discuss and learn more about the maritime single window and electronic data exchange, during a National Seminar on Facilitation of Maritime Traffic (24-26 September), in Batumi, Georgia, organized by IMO and the Maritime Transport Agency of Georgia.

Some 35 participants -  from various administrations with responsibilities in the clearance of ships, cargo, crew and passengers and private companies operating in Georgia's ports  - have been learning about the benefits of the FAL Convention requirement for all public authorities in ports to establish systems for the electronic exchange of information related to maritime transport and the recommendation to use a maritime single window. The aim is to make the maritime logistics chain more efficient. 

 

UN Secretary-General highlights shipping progress at Climate Summit

25/09/2019 

​In a cautious yet upbeat message at the close of the Climate Action Summit in New York (23 September), UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres praised the progress made by shipping in the race against the climate crisis, describing it as a "huge step up".

He referred to efforts being made by key players in the maritime industry to chart a course for carbon neutrality by 2050 in order to implement IMO's initial greenhouse gas reduction strategy. The strategy, adopted in 2018, is driving activities to reduce emissions throughout the sector.

The initial IMO strategy envisages a reduction of CO2 emissions per unit of transport work, the so-called carbon intensity, as an average across international shipping, of at least 40% by 2030 – at the same time, pursuing efforts towards a 70% reduction by 2050, compared to 2008.

It also envisages a reduction of total annual GHG emissions of at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008, aiming to phase them out as soon as possible. These levels of ambition, meaning actually more than 80% reduction of GHG missions per ship for ships currently at sea, are consistent with the Paris Agreement temperature goals.

The IMO initial strategy is expected to drive a new propulsion revolution for ships and has sent a clear signal to innovators and financiers that this is the way forward.

There are already strong signs emerging that sectors of the industry are really embracing this. Battery powered and hybrid ferries, ships trialing biofuels or hydrogen fuel cells, wind-assisted propulsion and several other ideas are now being actively explored. 

 

IMO showcasing tangible progress at global Climate Action summit

24/09/2019 

​The UN Climate Action Summit in New York (23 September) is giving global leaders the chance to show the world concrete proposals and tangible actions being taken in the fight against climate change.

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim has been reporting on the solid progress being made by the Organization to reduce GHG emissions from international shipping, in support of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular SDG 13 on Climate change.

Mr Lim delivered a keynote address at the opening of the World Economic Forum event on decarbonizing shipping. He then delivered a presentation at the launch of the Sustainable Ocean Principles, under the banner of the UN Global Compact. The Global Compact provides a tangible and practical way for the corporate world to embrace values that go beyond simply generating profits for their shareholders. Finally, he delivered a keynote address at the side-event organized by the Government of Belgium entitled "Actions speak louder than words".

He also took the opportunity for bilateral meetings with several key figures in the fight against climate change, including Ms Inger Andersen, who was appointed Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme in February this year. Mr Lim also met senior officials of the World Bank to discuss areas of common interest and to explore possible future collaboration to support the decarbonization of international shipping and its associated infrastructure, as well as marine plastic litter and waste management. 

Throughout the event, Mr Lim has been highlighting IMO's initial greenhouse gas strategy, adopted in 2018. This envisages a total annual GHG emissions reduction of at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008, and eventually phasing them out as soon as possible in this century. This means that individual ships currently at sea would have to reduce their emissions by more than 80%.

The IMO initial GHG strategy has sent a clear signal to the shipping industry of the way forward and there are already strong signs that it is being embraced by both industry and financial institutions. Battery powered and hybrid ferries, ships trialling biofuels or hydrogen fuel cells, wind-assisted propulsion and several other ideas are now being actively explored.

Alongside this, Mr Lim spoke of several major, global projects being led by IMO. These bring Member States and the industry together to promote implementation of all the various IMO measures related to GHG reduction. 

 

Empowering maritime women in Latin America

20/09/2019 

​IMO, with support from Malaysia, has given fresh impetus to an important regional network helping to promote women in the maritime community in Latin America. At a meeting in Colombia, (18-20 September 2019), the network of Women of the Maritime Authorities of Latin America (MAMLa) was put on a firm foundation. Some forty participants from 17 Maritime Authorities* from the region established a governance and membership structure, agreed on a work programme for 2020, highlighted training opportunities for members and formed a permanent secretariat, to be in Panama.

During the meeting, and as part of a mentorship and awareness-raising programme, members of the MAMLa network visited a local primary school, to introduce a career in maritime to the next generation - in particular, to young girls.

MAMLa was established by IMO in Chile in December 2017, with support from the Government of Malaysia, as part of the highly successful campaign to promote women in the maritime community that IMO has been running for more than 30 years.

With IMO's help, several regional Women in Maritime Associations have been established, covering more than 150 countries and dependent territories. These associations provide a focal point for women in the maritime professions to meet, to network and to provide support and guidance to each other.

MAMLa's second regional conference was held to coincide with the recent World Maritime Day parallel Event, also in Colombia.

* Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Panama and Peru.

 

Reducing marine plastic from ships

20/09/2019 

IMO has been working with southern and eastern African countries to help implement marine environment protection measures contained in one of the organization’s flagship treaties – MARPOL. A workshop held in Mombasa, Kenya (17-19) gathered participants from 12 countries* to focus on MARPOL Annexes I to V, and in particular the regulations covering garbage discharge from ships and adequacy of port reception facilities.

Participants discussed factors affecting full implementation of MARPOL and its annexes, including those issues identified during audits carried out under IMO's Member State Audit Scheme (IMSAS). These factors included incomplete transposition of the convention and its amendments into national legislation. Regional and national actions to address the existing barriers hampering full implementation and enforcement were agreed.

During the workshop, which was organised with the Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA), participants also visited the waste reception/recycling facilities in the port of Mombasa and discussed the waste facility licensing scheme and port waste management plans. The Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre (MTCC) for Africa, based in Mombasa, updated participants about their work on supporting implementation of MARPOL Annex VI and, in particular, the requirements on energy efficiency of ships. 

Find out more about IMO’s Action Plan on Marine Plastic Litter, here.

* Angola, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa, Uganda, Tanzania (United Republic of)

 

Focus on clean shipping in Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Gulf

20/09/2019 

​Measures for preventing air pollution from ships as well as energy efficiency requirements for ships are in the spotlight at a training event for eight countries* in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and the Gulf. 

The regional workshop in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (17-19 September) is covering IMO's MARPOL Annex VI treaty, which limits the main air pollutants contained in ships exhaust gas, including sulphur oxides and nitrous oxides, and includes energy-efficiency measures aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from ships. MARPOL Annex VI also prohibits deliberate emissions of ozone depleting substances.

The workshop is also focusing on the ship fuel data collection system, in force since March 2018, which requires ships of 5,000 gross tonnage and above to collect consumption data for each type of fuel oil they use.

The training is organised by IMO and PERSGA – the Regional Organization for the Conservation of the Environment of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. PERSGA, established under UN Environment's Regional Seas Programme, is a long-standing IMO partner in work to support sustainable governance of regional seas.

* Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan and United Arb Emirates.

 

Calling for countries to ratify treaty on hazardous and noxious cargoes

19/09/2019 

IMO is continuing its work to promote a key compensation treaty covering the transport of hazardous and noxious substances by ship – the HNS Convention.

When in force, the treaty will provide a regime of liability and compensation for damage caused by HNS cargoes transported by sea, including oil and chemicals. It covers not only pollution damage, but also the risks of fire and explosion, including loss of life or personal injury as well as loss of or damage to property.

IMO took part at the Hazardous Cargoes Forum in Singapore (17-18 September) to highlight the issue of container fires on board in the context of the HNS Convention.

To date, 5 States have ratified the treaty, covering just under 10 million tonnage of HNS contributing cargo. The treaty will enter into force when 40 million tonnage of HNS contributing cargo has been received.

 

Getting to grips with model course on oil pollution emergencies

19/09/2019 

In the event of an oil pollution incident, prompt and effective action is essential in order to minimize environmental damage. A workshop in Manila, Philippines (17-20 September) aims to equip trainers with the necessary skills to be able to deliver training on emergency response, preparation and planning.   

The event also helps participants to familiarise themselves with key elements of the updated International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (OPRC) model courses. The trainers learn teaching techniques and approaches to training delivery. The main objectives of the OPRC Convention are to facilitate international co-operation and mutual assistance in preparing for and responding to a marine pollution incident.

Nearly 30 delegates from five of the ten ASEAN Member States are attending the course, which is being implemented with the support of the Global Initiative for South East Asia (GI-SEA).


 

Training underway for Jeddah information sharing centre

13/09/2019 

The new, state-of-the-art Jeddah Maritime Information Sharing Centre is set to boost information sharing and support maritime security in the region. The first 15 national operators to work in the centre have completed a three-week training in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (25 August – 12 Sep 2019) with the support of IMO.

It is envisaged that the centre will become fully operational by the end of the year. It will serve both as a regional centre to share information through the Djibouti Code of Conduct focal points, as well as sharing info with all national agencies with responsibility for maritime security.

Following the adoption of the Jeddah Amendment in 2017, participating States agreed on the need to enhance the Djibouti Code of Conduct information sharing network to meet the increased requirements of the revised code. Commitments include establishing multi-agency National Maritime Information Sharing Centres in each of the participating States. These Centres will be the backbone of the regional network, working to encourage inter-agency cooperation between national agencies dealing with maritime security.

 

Building good maritime security in Ghana

13/09/2019 

Ghana is the latest country to benefit from training on the implementation of IMO maritime security standards in SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.

The workshop (9 -13 September) was held in Accra, Ghana. Participants discussed ways to cooperate at the national level to acquire the necessary support they need in order to take ownership of implementation and compliance with the requirements. 

The event brought together representatives from Ghana Maritime Authority, Ghana port and harbour Authority, Ship owners and several ports operators, who have been trained to train other officials with similar responsibilities.

Oversight roles and responsibilities of the designated authority responsible for implementing the ISPS Code were also covered during the workshop.

The workshop on the ISPS Code for Designated Authority (DA) and Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs) was organized by IMO and the Government of Ghana, under the auspices of IMO's Global Maritime Security Programme. 


 

Promoting wreck removal

13/09/2019 

IMO is continuing its work to promote ratification of the international treaty covering wreck removal – at the 10th Maritime Salvage & Casualty Response Conference in London, this week (11-12 September).

Depending on its location, a shipwreck may be a hazard to navigation, potentially endangering other vessels and their crews. The Nairobi Convention covers the legal basis for States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks, drifting ships, objects from ships at sea, and floating offshore installations.

The Nairobi convention includes provisions for coastal States to take action in cases of container fires on board ships, as well as loss of containers.

The Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention has been in force since 2015 and currently has 47 contracting States, representing 73% of world gross tonnage.

 

London shipping week puts emphasis on empowering women

12/09/2019 

IMO’s World Maritime theme for 2019 – “Empowering women in the Maritime Community” has featured prominently in events at the London International Shipping Week (9-13 September). A seminar co-hosted by Inmarsat and WISTA international (10 September) explored the theme of Diversity and Digitalisation in the Shipping Industry.

Opening the event, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said, “If the fundamental nature of work is changing, this is the perfect time to re-examine and re-assess traditional roles and expectations in the workforce – and that means embracing diversity, and equality.” He stressed that promoting gender equality in shipping was important not only for its own sake, but also for the practical reality that shipping must draw talent from every corner of the globe and every sector of the population to secure its own sustainability.

IMO has been running a highly successful programme to promote women in the maritime community for more than 30 years. With IMO's help, seven regional Women in Maritime Associations have been established, covering more than 150 countries and dependent territories. IMO provides gender-specific fellowships and scholarships, both at its own maritime education establishments – the International Maritime Law Institute and the World Maritime University – and at others, too.

This year, to help celebrate the World Maritime theme, IMO is undertaking a range of initiatives and events, such as panel discussions, a social media campaign and has launched a new film – Turning the Tide.

 

GESAMP - celebrating fifty years of service in ocean science

12/09/2019 

When developing policies or strategies affecting the ocean, the United Nations system needs to base its work on a solid, scientific foundation. That is provided by GESAMP, a unique independent body administered by IMO and which, this week, is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

GESAMP is the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection. It is the independent body of experts that advises the United Nations system on both on-going and newly arising marine environmental scientific issues.

It's 50th anniversary was celebrated at the UN Headquarters in New York (10 September) at an event co-hosted by the UN Division of Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea and the UN Development Programme. The event highlighted GESAMP's past achievements, its current work and explored possibilities for its future contributions.

For a fascinating insight into the history and achievements of this vital yet often unsung body, visit the GESAMP website.


 

Malaysia encourages gender diversity in the maritime industry

12/09/2019 

The 2019 World Maritime Week kicked off in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (10 September), with an opening session dedicated to "Encouraging gender diversity in the maritime industry" in recognition of this year's IMO World Maritime theme.

During the session, IMO showcased its Women in Maritime gender programme. The primary objective of the IMO Women in Maritime programme is to encourage IMO Member States to open the doors of their maritime institutes to enable women to train alongside men and acquire the high-level of competence that the maritime industry demands.

Made up of an international panel of women in the maritime sector, stimulating debates followed. More than 400 participants across the maritime industry in Malaysia, including maritime authorities, sectoral professionals, academia, industry leaders and experts attended the event to meet, network and promote collaboration and the exchange of ideas.

The event was organized by the Malaysia Shipowners' Association (MASA).


 

Oil spill liability and compensation training underway in Nigeria

12/09/2019 

Nigerian officials dealing with oil spill liability and compensation are undergoing training under the GI WACAF – a collaboration between IMO and IPIECA to strengthen oil spill response capacity in west, central and southern Africa.

Seventy participants from across national authorities, federal government and oil and maritime industries are taking part in the workshop in Lagos, Nigeria (10-12 September).

The training is focused on how to implement IMO conventions dealing with liability. It includes technical presentations, case studies and table-top exercises on cost evaluation and compensation procedures.

The event, run by experts from IOPC Funds and ITOPF, is the first to be organised by the Nigerian Maritime Administration & Safety Agency (NIMASA) and the National Oil Spill Detection and Response Agency (NOSDRA).

 

International regulation of ports - yes or no?

09/09/2019 

​Ports are essential for the global supply chain - but do they need more international regulation? High-level speakers engaged in a lively debate at a joint Hutchison Ports/IMO/IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) seminar (9 September), to address the question: "Do ports need international regulation?". Click for photos.

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim reminded the audience that the IMO Convention does give the Organization a mandate to regulate in ports and some current IMO regulations do indeed extend to port operations - for example those surrounding security, reception facilities and the Facilitation (FAL) Convention. "However, there are many opportunities to further explore and enhance the cooperation between shipping, ports and the logistics industries," Mr Lim said, adding that a port sector that can streamline procedures and remove barriers to trade, embrace new technologies, and treat safety, security and reputation as both desirable and marketable, will be a major driver towards stability and sustainable development – and support the achievement of the UN sustainable development goals (SDGS).

Speakers agreed that more dialogue with ports and more involvement from port-related stakeholders at IMO were necessary, particularly with advancements in automation and digitalisation. Ports are becoming increasingly relevant in actions to combat climate change and reduce shipping emissions, including supply of low-emission fuels for ships, port call optimisation and just-in-time operations and moves towards sustainable on-shore power supply, requiring port infrastructure and information exchange. But the extent of any international regulation needed to be carefully discussed. Capacity building was also key to ensuring harmonization and implementation of existing and any new international standards, codes of practices and guidelines.

United Kingdom Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP also highlighted the advances being made in the integrated supply chain. "What new standards will be needed is a question we need to answer," she said, adding that regulation needs to be responsive to new challenges and be fit for purpose.

Panellists reflected on the IMO World Maritime theme for 2019, Empowering Women in the maritime community, and welcomed increasing opportunities for females, especially with increasing automation of manual tasks in what is still a male-dominated sector, particularly on the dock side.

The event at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom was part of London International shipping Week (LISW). IMO's Frederick Kenney moderated. Participants were welcomed by Clemence Cheng, Executive Director, Hutchison Ports. Professor David Attard, Director, IMO International Maritime Law Institute, outlined the role of ports in maritime law and highlighted the importance of enforcement of regulations, including through implementation into national law, and the need for capacity building and training. Panellists were: Mr. Patrick Verhoeven, International Association of Ports and Harbours (IAPH); Mr. Guy Platten, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS); Ms. Lamia Kerdjoudj-Belkaid, The Federation of European Private Port Companies and Terminals (FEPORT); Andrew Higgs Setfords Solicitors; Ms. Sakura Kuma, Yokohama and Kawasaki International Port (YKIP); and Ms. Diana Whitney, Hutchison Ports.

 

Safe handling of bulk cargoes

09/09/2019 

​The safety of ships carrying bulk cargoes depends on proper implementation of IMO rules - and training is crucial. A new IMO Model Course on Safe Handling and Transport of Solid Bulk Cargoes is expected to be validated by IMO's Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers when it meets this week (CCC 6, 9-13 September) (Photos here). The course will focus on the mandatory measures for handling and transport of solid bulk cargoes outlined in the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code, which is the industry rulebook on how to deal with such cargoes. IMO model courses are designed to facilitate access to knowledge and skills. The course will cover all solid bulk cargoes, including those which may liquefy when moisture limits are reached and cause instability of the ship. These cargoes require that particular attention is paid to testing and recording moisture limits before loading. 

Given the new fuels and/or fuel blends being developed to ensure compliance with the 0.50% sulphur limit (from 1 January 2020) and IMO 2030 and 2050 CO₂ emission targets, as outlined in the IMO GHG strategy, the work of the Sub-Committee on the safety provisions for ships using low-flashpoint fuels, will be considered as a high priority. The Sub-Committee will be looking at matters related to newer types of fuel, under the agenda item on the International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code).

Draft interim guidelines for the safety of ships using methyl/ethyl alcohol as fuel are expected to be finalised. Another set of draft interim guidelines being developed covers the safety of ships using fuel cell power installations.  

Under its ongoing work on containers, the Sub-Committee will consider proposed amendments to the inspection programmes for cargo transport units carrying dangerous goods. The session is also expected to finalise the work to develop draft amendments to the Code of Safe Practice for Cargo Stowage and Securing (CSS Code) related to weather-dependent lashing, aimed at ensuring the highest level of cargo securing, taking into account expected weather and other factors. 

The meeting was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Ms. Maryanne Adams of the Marshall Islands. 

 

Training trainers for maritime security in West Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden

06/09/2019 

The latest course to prepare participants to deliver training to enhance security in the maritime domain has been delivered at the Djibouti Regional Training Centre (DRTC), Djibouti (1-5 September).

Participants from 13 countries * learned teaching skills and were given instruction on dealing with maritime crimes at sea, including piracy/robbery, drug trafficking, marine terrorism, weapons smuggling and human trafficking.

The IMO-led course was funded through a Japanese contribution to the Djibouti Code of Conduct trust Fund. It was officially launched by the Japanese Ambassador to Djibouti, H.E. Koji Yonetani.

The training is part of an ongoing project which has to date supported 83 courses and benefitted nearly 1,690 trainees from the region.

* Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Mozambique, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen.

 

Towards e-navigation in Asia-Pacific

06/09/2019 

The implementation of e-navigation - the user-friendly collection, harmonization and display of essential maritime information - will contribute to enhanced maritime safety and security and support efficient shipping while protecting the marine environment. Various e-navigation solutions are being developed, taking into account IMO guidance and regulations. The SMART-Navigation Project, organized and funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Republic of Korea, was presented during an IMO regional workshop on e-navigation for the Asia-Pacific region, held in Busan, Republic of Korea (4-6 September). The main aim of the workshop was to promote e-navigation amongst the participating countries from the Asia-Pacific region and discuss a way forward for collaboration and implementation under the theme "If you want to go fast, go alone, if you want to far, go together", a key message that was emphasized by the Minister of Oceans and Fisheries, Mr. Seong-Hyeok Moon.

The IMO workshop was hosted by the Republic of Korea, through the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries and organized by IMO and IALA. Participants also attended the e-Navigation Underway Asia-Pacific 2019 Conference in Seoul (2-3 September), and the Korea Maritime Safety Expo in Busan (4-6 September).

 

Pacific protection activities expanded

02/09/2019 

A key IMO-supported international centre responsible for co-ordinating efforts to protect the marine environment in the north-west Pacific Ocean is to expand its areas of work, following a high-level meeting in Seoul.

MERRAC (the Marine Environmental Emergency Preparedness and Response Regional Activity Centre), is the focus for cooperation between China, Japan, the Republic of Korea and the Russian Federation on preventing spills, and ensuring an effective joint response to any spills that do occur in the region.

At the latest meeting of focal points (28-30 August), the four countries agreed to enhance their cooperation by identifying new areas of work for MERRAC, such as monitoring  illegal discharges under IMO’s MARPOL convention, including by use of unmanned aircraft, and developing additional response manuals for managing spills involving hazardous and noxious substances (HNS), such as gasoline or liquefied gas. These new work streams are expected to start in 2020. 

MERRAC was established in 2000 by IMO, UN Environment and the Republic of Korea under UN Environment's Regional Seas Programme. Hosted in the Republic of Korea, it is one of four Regional Activity Centres operating within the Northwest Pacific Action Plan (NOWPAP). 

The meeting (the 22nd NOWPAP-MERRAC Focal Points Meeting) also invited MERRAC to collaborate with similar centres established under other Regional Seas Programmes, such as REMPEC in the Mediterranean and REMPEITC in the Caribbean. MERRAC is also to assist IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee in developing an operational guide on responding to HNS spills.

 

Committed to protecting South-East Asian seas

31/08/2019 

The seven South-East Asian countries participating in IMO’s MEPSEAS* project have reiterated their commitment to implementing high priority IMO conventions** which aim to protect the marine environment.

Delegations from Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam, led by their Heads of Maritime Administrations and other senior officials, gathered at the Second High-level Regional Meeting of the project in Manila, Philippines (27-29 August). Special emphasis was put on MARPOL Annex V, which covers pollution from ships by garbage, given the major threat posed by plastic pollution in the region – one of the planet’s worst affected areas.

The Manila meeting provided a platform to take stock of the first two years of the MEPSEAS project, which is implemented by IMO in partnership with the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad), and to plan for the next two years.

Looking ahead, the delegations emphasized their interest in the capacity building component of the project, which will focus on compliance, monitoring and enforcement; and on developing and implementing administrative procedures for port State control and flag State implementation.

Cooperation under the Tokyo MoU umbrella was explored. The meeting also discussed the plans for a regional conference focussed on green technologies for maritime transport, to be held in 2020.  

The delegations also addressed the subject of women’s rights and gender equality – one of the developmental objectives of the project. They unanimously supported a proposal to consider engaging with the project strategic partner, Women in Maritime Association, Asia (WIMA Asia), for organising awareness raising seminars on marine environmental issues and to promote strategies and policies on gender equality.

The meeting was hosted by the Maritime Industry Authority of Philippines (MARINA). It was attended by IMO and Norad representatives and MEPSEAS strategic partners (Singapore, Tokyo MoU Secretariat, PEMSEA and WIMA Asia) and an observer from MTCC-Asia.

* Marine Environment Protection of the South-East Asian Seas (MEPSEAS)

** The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL); the Anti-Fouling Systems Convention (AFS); the London dumping of wastes at sea convention and protocol (LC/LP); and the Ballast Water Management Convention (BWM)

 

Seychelles gets train the trainer workshop

30/08/2019 

Proper implementation of IMO's maritime security measures is essential for trade. The Seychelles is the latest country to benefit from training on the implementation of SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.

Participants discussed ways to cooperate at the national level to acquire the necessary support they need in order to take ownership of implementation and compliance with IMO maritime security measures. They also learned how to train other officials with similar responsibilities.

The workshop which concluded today in Mahe, Seychelles (26-30 August) brought together Port facility Security Officers (PFSOs) and representatives involved in maritime and port security, including Seychelles Ports Authority, Seychelles Maritime Safety Administration, Customs, Seychelles Coast Guard Service, maritime police, and several other port operators.

Oversight roles and responsibilities of the designated authority responsible for implementing the ISPS Code were also covered during the workshop.

The workshop on the ISPS Code for Designated Authority (DA) and Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs) was organized by IMO and the Government of Seychelles, under the auspices of IMO's Global Maritime Security Programme. 


 

Oil spill response – building Caribbean capability

29/08/2019 

Developing and maintaining sound capability to respond effectively to marine pollution incidents involving oil, hazardous and noxious substances is a priority in the Caribbean, which is home to many vulnerable ecosystems.

In response, the Curacao-based Regional Marine Pollution Emergency, Information and Training Centre for the Caribbean (REMPEITC-Caribe) organized a transboundary oil spill response exercise in Suriname (27-28 August).

The event brought together response managers from Suriname and their western neighbour Guyana to test their response plans and discuss international coordination in case of an oil spill.  The workshop built on previous national contingency planning workshops held in both countries, examining revisions made to both plans. 

All these activities are in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 14 – Life Below Water, as they aim to develop capacity to protect marine and coastal ecosystems.

IMO funded the event and also sponsored a female Guyanese representative to attend the event through its IMO Women in Maritime programme.


 

IMO helping maritime into the development mainstream

28/08/2019 

​IMO has delivered the latest in a series of initiatives designed to help put the maritime sector into the mainstream of plans and initiatives to achieve the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), agreed by world leaders in 2015.

The United Nations development system collectively supports countries working to achieve the SDGs through a mechanism called the United Nations Sustainable Development Cooperation Framework (UNSDCF). Through the UNSDCF, UN country teams and national authorities work together to identify plans and priorities for development at the national level.

Under its own strategic plan, IMO is working with national maritime authorities to help them ensure that the maritime sector is given due consideration when national plans and initiatives are formulated within the umbrella of the UNSCDF. Maritime activity is seen an essential component of any programme for future sustainable economic growth and most of the elements of the 2030 Agenda will only be realized with a sustainable transport sector supporting world trade and facilitating global economy. 

Earlier this month (19-20 August), IMO helped deliver a workshop in Bangkok, Thailand to assist maritime authorities from Asian countries to build maritime activity into their national plans for the SDGs. This was the second such workshop, following a similar event in Chile (2018). Further workshops are planned for Africa and the Pacific region. The workshop was organized and delivered in collaboration with the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UN ESCAP) and the United Nations Development Coordination Office (UN DCO).

 

Importance of Polar Code stressed at Greenland summit

28/08/2019 

Changing climatic conditions are opening up the polar regions to more and more maritime activity. But ships which operate in the harsh Arctic and Antarctic regions are exposed to many unique risks – so their safety, and the protection of the polar environment, have always been a matter of concern for IMO. IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim is visiting Ilulissat, Greenland (25-29 August) to participate in a high-level roundtable on Arctic shipping. It is the first ever visit to Greenland by an IMO Secretary-General.

During his opening remarks, Mr Lim emphasised the need for balanced and sustainable shipping activities in Arctic waters. He added that maritime infrastructure needs to be further developed and that more collaboration is necessary, considering the challenges ships face operating in polar waters. Naalakkersuisoq Karl Frederik Danielsen, Greenland's Minister of Housing and Infrastructure, said that IMO's Polar Code, which stipulates mandatory safety and environmental standards for ships in Polar waters, is an instrument of great importance to Greenland. The event is co-sponsored by the Danish Maritime Authority and the Government of Greenland.


 

Legal framework key for the newly established Somalia Maritime Administration

27/08/2019 

Somalia has more than 3,300 km of coastline, the longest and perhaps the most geographically significant in the Horn of Africa, four main commercial seaports and about five minor ports. But plagued by decades of civil war, a lot of effort is required to rebuild the sector.

IMO and the United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) have organized a workshop in Mogadishu, Somalia (25-27 August 2019) to finalize the much-awaited Somalia Shipping Code with the hope that it will be enacted in parliament. The Somalia Shipping Code includes the necessary steps required to accede all key IMO treaties, enabling the country to meet its responsibilities in line with IMO instruments.

36 senior officials from the Federal Government of Somalia (FGS) have received technical training to continue developing the Shipping Code with the view to establish a National Maritime Administration for Somalia. The workshop was key in guiding and providing the necessary institutional infrastructure for the management and delivery of the international obligations necessary for the maritime sector to thrive in the region.


 

Protecting marine biodiversity in the East Indian Ocean

23/08/2019 

"The introduction of invasive aquatic organisms into new marine environments not only affects biodiversity and ecosystem health, but also has measurable impacts on a number of economic sectors" said Lilia Khodjet El Khil, head of the IMO-led GloFouling Partnerships project.

The GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships project has concluded two workshops, one workshop in Madagascar and one in Mauritius (19-20 & 22-23 August, respectively), two of 12 lead partnering countries whose aim is to protect marine biodiversity by addressing biofouling. 

During the first workshop, held in Antananarivo, Madagascar, Captain Jean Edmond Randrianantenaina, added that "these invasive species can also pose a threat to public health through consumption of fish products".  The overall impact can affect several sectors including, among others, maritime transport, natural resources, fisheries and tourism.

In Mauritius, Hon Mr. Premdut Koonjoo, Minister for Ocean Economy, Marine Resources, Fisheries and Shipping, highlighted the importance of SDG 14 and the role of marine environment to a sustainable future for Small Developing Island States such as Mauritius.

The two workshops also looked at who will make up national task forces in the region, as those roles will be crucial in leading and implementing a national strategy for addressing the issue of invasive aquatic species transferred through marine biofouling.

Invasive species are one of the five main direct drivers of change in nature and biodiversity loss, as recently confirmed by 150 leading international experts from over 50 countries in the IPBES Global Assessment Report of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services.

The GloFouling Partnerships is an IMO-executed project launched to protect marine biodiversity from the introduction of non-indigenous species into new ecosystems through biofouling.  Biofouling is the process by which marine organisms can build up on ships' hulls and the surface of other marine structures.

The GloFouling Partnerships is helping its 12 lead partner countries to assess their current status in relation to invasive aquatic species, including an economic impact study, a guide for developing a national strategy, and specialised training courses on marine biofouling and legal issues related to the implementation of IMO's Biofouling Guidelines. 

 

Steps towards new treaty to protect marine biodiversity

21/08/2019 

​The IMO Secretariat is attending the latest in a series of conferences to develop a legally binding international instrument, under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction - known as 'BBNJ'. The 3rd Intergovernmental Conference (IGC) is being held at UN Headquarters in New York, United States (19-30 August). The current Conference session is the third in a series, with the fourth (final session) set to take place in the first half of 2020.

The current conference session is discussing the draft treaty text. IMO representatives are attending the plenary sessions and working groups on area-based management tools, environmental impact assessments, capacity building and technology transfer and cross-cutting issues. IMO has been present throughout the process of developing the BBNJ agreement, through the preparatory phase as well as the IGC, to provide the negotiating States with information and assistance in developing the new instrument. 

IMO's has experience in developing universal binding regulations for international shipping to ensure shipping's sustainable use of the oceans, through more than 50 globally-binding treaties. IMO regulations are enforced throughout the world's oceans through a well-established system of flag, coastal and port State control. Many IMO measures actively contribute to the conservation of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction, including the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution by ships (MARPOL) and the International Ballast Water Management Convention - which aims to prevent the transfer of potentially invasive aquatic species - as well as the London Convention and Protocol regulating the dumping of wastes at sea. IMO has adopted numerous protective measures, which all ships must adhere to, both in and outside designated sensitive sea areas (PSSAs) and in special areas and emission control areas. These include strict rules on operational discharges as well as areas to be avoided and other ship routeing systems, including those aimed at keeping shipping away from whales' breeding grounds. IMO's Polar Code is mandatory for ships for operating in the Arctic and Antarctic. IMO has also issued guidance on protecting marine life from underwater ship noise.

In June 2019, the President of the Intergovernmental Conference, Mrs. Rena Lee of Singapore, addressed IMO Member State representatives at an event at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom, to heighten awareness of the interplay between the BBNJ instrument and the IMO mandate. The IMO Secretariat has also provided Member States with an analysis of relevant provisions of the draft BBNJ instrument with respect to the IMO mandate.

 

Oil spill contingency planning in South East Asia

20/08/2019 

​One of the key elements in oil spill contingency planning is to define the communication channels to be used by cooperating parties when facing an incident. A workshop in Pulau Indah, Klang, Malaysia (19-21 August) has brought together officials from states in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), to help bring into operation the Regional Oil Spill Contingency Plan, which was adopted in 2018. Participants from nine countries got to grips with key elements of the plan and practised communications between States, in order to identify any gaps and lessons to be learned. The workshop will help drive forward the implementation of this recently adopted plan. 

This workshop is being carried out under IMO's Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme and hosted by the Government of Malaysia and the Marine Department of Malaysia, at the Maritime Transport Training Institute, under the framework of the Global Initiative project for South East Asia (GI SEA), a joint project with the oil and gas industry (ipieca). It supports the implementation of IMO's Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (the OPRC 90 Convention).

The Regional Oil Spill Contingency Plan provides for a mechanism whereby ASEAN Member States can request for and provide mutual assistance in response to any oil spills. It also ensures a common understanding to enable the effective integration between the affected and assisting ASEAN Member States, in the event of incidents involving oil spills. 

 

Training for maritime security in Libya

19/08/2019 

IMO maritime security training is underway for Libyan port facility security officers, managers and designated authority officials (18-22 August). The workshop, delivered in English and in Arabic, aims to assist the Libyan Government in enhanced security risk assessments and controls on maritime transport through its territory.

Fifteen officers in charge of port security from ports across the country are attending, including five from the national maritime security committee in charge of oversight the implementation of the Code in the country. Participants are being trained on how to perform their duties in line with SOLAS Chapter XI-2 (click for details), the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code), and related guidance. Participants are also being taught to train other officials with similar responsibilities.

The workshop will also allow the IMO team to understand the level of knowledge and existing skills among the officials - with a view to assessing capacity and suitability of potential follow-up assistance. The event was organized at the request of the President of the Libyan Port and Maritime Transport Authority, and held in neighboring Tunisia.

 

Brazil readies its biofouling task force

13/08/2019 

Biodiversity can be threatened by organisms which can build up on ships' hulls and other marine structures, a process known as biofouling. During a workshop in Arraial do Cabo, Brazil (5 August), experts on biofouling and invasive species and others took the first steps towards setting up a national task force to tackle the issue. Brazil is one of 12 lead partnering countries in the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships project, which aims to protect marine biodiversity by addressing biofouling. 

Each lead partnering country's national task force will define a national policy on biofouling and invasive species and draft the national strategy and action plan to implement the IMO Biofouling Guidelines. The next step for GloFouling Partnerships in Brazil will be to develop national baseline reports to assess the current situation with regards to non-indigenous species, to identify any research currently available on the subject, to analyse the economic impacts and to determine the national legal framework.

The Glofouling workshop was held during the XIII Biofouling, Benthic Ecology and Marine Biotechnology Meeting (XIII BIOINC), hosted by the Instituto de Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira (5-9 August). As well as national experts on biofouling and invasive species, participants included representatives from Marinha do Brasil, from other departments from federal and state administrations and from leading private sector companies such as Petrobras and Vale.

The IMO-executed GloFouling Partnerships project to address bioinvasions by organisms which can build up on ships' hulls and other marine structures is a collaboration between the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and IMO. Twelve lead partnering countries (Brazil, Ecuador, Fiji, Indonesia, Jordan, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mexico, Peru, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Tonga), four regional organizations, IOC-UNESCO, the World Ocean Council and numerous strategic partners have signed up to the project.  

 

Implementing IMO treaties - the legal bit

09/08/2019 

IMO treaties need to be implemented into national law so that they can be applied on ships flying the flag of a particular country and so that those countries can implement effective port State control and comply with other obligations under the specified IMO instruments. An IMO course provides lawyers and legislative drafters with the tools they need to understand IMO treaties, how they are developed and adopted - and the implementation of those treaties into national legislation. Participants from Latin America attended a regional workshop on the general principles of drafting maritime legislation to implement IMO Conventions, in Guayaquil, Ecuador (5-9 August).

Relevant treaties covered by the IMO mandatory Member State audit scheme were covered, as well as liability and compensation conventions. Participants learned best practices in the legal implementation process, with special attention given to the implementation of amendments to IMO treaties which are adopted through the tacit acceptance procedure. The ultimate goal of the workshop is to leave participants able to develop national legislation and to keep it up to date to ensure compliance with the IMO standards.

The regional Workshop on the Transposition of IMO Instruments into National Legislation for ROCRAM Countries was organized by IMO and the Secretariat of the Operative Network for Regional Cooperation among Maritime Authorities of the Americas (ROCRAM), in collaboration with Prefectura Naval Argentina and Directorate General of Maritime Territory and Merchant Marine (DIRECTEMAR) of the Republic of Chile, who provided experts free of charge. IMO sponsored 21 participants from: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Venezuela. Eight national participants from Ecuador also took part.  

 

Support to boost maritime security in Kenya

09/08/2019 

​Proper implementation of IMO's maritime security measures is essential for trade. Kenya is the latest country to benefit from training on the implementation of SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. A national workshop in Mombasa, Kenya (5-9 August) brought together Port facility security officers (PFSOs) as well as representatives of all structures involved in maritime and port security, including Kenya Ports Authority, Kenya Maritime Authority, Customs, Kenya Coast Guard Service, maritime police, and several other port operators.

PFSOs discussed ways to cooperate at the national level to provide the necessary support required in order to take ownership of implementation and compliance with IMO maritime security measures – and to gain the knowledge needed to train others. The oversight roles and responsibilities of the designated authority responsible for implementing the ISPS Code  were also covered during the workshop.

The workshop on the ISPS Code for Designated Authority (DA) and Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs) was organized by IMO and the Government of Kenya, under the auspices of IMO's Global Maritime Security Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP). 

 

Working with your neighbour on addressing oil spill response

09/08/2019 

A good working relationship with neighbouring countries is key, especially in the event of a trans-boundary oil spill incident. Namibia and Angola undertook a simultaneous cross-boundary oil spill response training exercise (6-9 August), in Luanda, Angola, and Walvis Bay, Namibia.

Both countries' are located in an oil-producing region with heavy maritime traffic, resulting in increased risks of pollution for the vulnerable marine environment. In the event of an oil spill in one country, chances are that it may affect its neighbour as oil spills know no boundary. Regional cooperation is crucial when it comes to oil spill preparedness and response. The International Convention on oil pollution preparedness, response and cooperation (OPRC) specifically encourages such initiatives to foster international cooperation.

The training sought to test communication links between Angola and Namibia and examine the mechanism required to seek assistance and mobilize international resources, in case of an oil-spill incident.

The workshop agreed a set of recommendations for both countries, which will form the basis for a sub-regional oil spill contingency plan.

The event was hosted by the Ministry of works and Transport in Namibia, via its Directorate of Maritime Affairs, and the Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources in Angola. The workshop was supported by GI WACAF, a collaboration between IMO and IPIECA to strengthen oil spill response capacity in west, central and southern Africa


 

Updating Cambodia's oil spill preparedness plan

07/08/2019 

Supporting countries to prepare for contingencies is an important part of IMO's capacity building work. Cambodia is the latest country to benefit from IMO assistance to update its oil spill contingency plan, by identifying country-specific risks and existing gaps in order to be able to respond effectively to oil spill incidents. A national workshop in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (6-9 August) has brought together 60 participants from 20 government entities and oil companies. Attendees received an overview of the international framework for oil spill preparedness and response and are working to develop an action plan to finalize and implement the national oil spill contingency plan. 

The workshop was organized under the framework of the Global Initiative project for South East Asia (GI SEA), a joint project with the oil and gas industry (IPIECA). This supports implementation of IMO's Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (the OPRC 90 Convention).

 

Sharing ship recycling knowledge and best practices

06/08/2019 

Global application of the regulations in IMO's treaty for safe and environmentally-sound ship recycling - the Hong Kong Convention -  will have significant benefits for the environment and for the safety of workers in the sector.

China, a major ship recycling country, has been developing its ship recycling facilities to ensure their compliance with the environmental and occupational health and safety requirements of the Hong Kong Convention.

China shared its experience and knowledge with representatives of the government and ship recycling industry from Bangladesh, during an IMO Seminar on Ship Recycling and the Hong Kong Convention, held in Zhoushan, China (23-25 July).

The programme included a day-long seminar on ship recycling regulation and practices and the Hong Kong Convention. This was followed by site visits to Zhoushan Changhong International Ship Recycling Company Limited, a facility which builds, repairs and recycles ships in compliance with the international and national regulations and guidelines; and Zhoushan Nahai Solid Waste Central Disposal Company Limited to see its Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facility for waste management. 

The event was hosted by China Maritime Safety Administration (MSA). It was part of a knowledge sharing endeavour within the framework of the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships in Bangladesh – Phase II (SENSREC) project, which IMO is implementing jointly with the Government of Bangladesh. The SENSREC project aims to facilitate the ratification and effective implementation of the Hong Kong Convention to ensure safe and environmentally sound ship recycling in Bangladesh.

The seminar was jointly organized by the IMO and China MSA, supported by the China Waterborne Transport Research and other relevant stakeholders of the Government of the People's Republic of China.

Momentum is growing worldwide towards the ratification and implementation of the Hong Kong Convention, which covers the design, construction, operation and maintenance of ships, and preparation for ship recycling in order to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships. Under the treaty, ships to be sent for recycling are required to carry an inventory of hazardous materials, specific to each ship. Ship recycling yards are required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", specifying the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory. The treaty currently has 13 contracting States, representing 29.42% of world merchant shipping tonnage.

 

China fishing vessel safety workshop looks towards treaty ratification

01/08/2019 

​Fisheries-related conventions are key tools used by flag, coastal and port States to effectively monitor and control fishing vessels and minimise the risk of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing activities, by enhancing transparency, traceability and governance.

This was the focus of a national workshop in Shanghai, China (29-30 July),  organized by the Shanghai Ocean University and the Bureau of Fisheries of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs of the People's Republic of China, with input from IMO, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), The Pew Charitable Trusts and the IMO Number Scheme manager (IHS Markit).

Participants discussed China's potential ratification and implementation of fisheries-related conventions, including IMO's 2012 Cape Town Agreement (CTA), aimed at improving safety standards on fishing vessels, and the 1995 Standards on Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel (STCW-F).

They also discussed the implementation of the FAO 2009 Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing (PSMA).

The People's Republic of China is yet to become a Party to the IMO fishing vessel safety and training treaties. However, China reported that considerable research has begun into ratification implications. With thousands of seagoing fishing vessels of 24 metres and above, China's accession to the Cape Town Agreement would have considerable global impact. Mr. Han Xu, Deputy Director-General of the Bureau of Fisheries, said that the Chinese Government focuses on the safety of fishers and said, "There are difficulties in implementing these conventions due to the scale of our fleet, however we have a saying in China – there are more solutions than problems."

IMO's Brice Martin-Castex, said, "We are delighted to be here in Shanghai discussing these issues and hope that this workshop will pave the way for continued cooperation. The conventions and measures we are talking about work together, however the Cape Town Agreement is not yet in force. China can greatly contribute to its entry into force, as a founding State, which is an opportunity not to be missed."

The workshop concluded with several positive outcomes. China pledged to attend the Ministerial Conference on Fishing Vessel Safety and Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing, organized by IMO and the Government of Spain, Torremolinos, Málaga, Spain (21-23 October 2019) and to provide the conference with  information on measures to be taken for the entry into force of the Cape Town Agreement.

China also welcomed the IMO Number Scheme manager's proposal to allow for phased allocation of the IMO Ship Identification numbers to Chinese fishing vessels of 12 metres in length and above. This will also be used to populate the FAO's Global Record of Fishing Vessels, Refrigerated Transport Vessels and Supply Vessels. The IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme is currently voluntary for fishing vessels.

To date, 11 States with a total of 1,413 vessels have ratified the Cape Town Agreement. The treaty will enter into force 12 months after at least 22 States, with an aggregate 3,600 fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over operating on the high seas have expressed their consent to be bound by it.

The Ministerial Conference on Fishing Vessel Safety and IUU Fishing (21-23 October) will be followed by the Joint FAO/ILO/IMO Working Group on IUU Fishing (23-25 October).   

The workshop was attended by 45 participants from the Bureau of Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs; Ministry of Transport; Shanghai Ocean University; Dalian Maritime University; China Overseas Fisheries Association; China Classification Society; all China's coastal provincial port authorities; IMO; FAO; The Pew Charitable Trusts and the IMO Number Scheme manager (IHS Markit).

 

Pacific workshop enhances preparedness for search and rescue

30/07/2019 

A mass rescue operations sea and air search and rescue (SAR) exercise in the Pacific Ocean off Hawaii, United States, was just one key element in the 8th Regional Pacific SAR (PacSAR) Workshop (22-26 July). The workshop, organized by IMO in collaboration with the Pacific Community (SPC), aimed to promote ratification of the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue, 1979 (SAR Convention) in the region, identify gaps and promote common best practices in SAR services. (Video)

Besides the practical MRO exercise, participants, including Pacific Island SAR administrators and coordinators, attended classroom-based sessions covering a range of issues. These included SAR coordination across the Pacific Islands region; the effectiveness of SAR and MRO Planning and Management; and understanding of the international requirements for SAR. Sessions also addressed understanding of maritime and aeronautical SAR Services and the links between them; and understanding of the limitations of SAR aerial and surface assets to assist in improving detection and response efforts during SAR operations. 

The workshop, which is held every two years, also provided an opportunity for learning through exchange of view and experience and an opportunity for Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) to review progress against the previously adopted PacSAR SC Strategic Plan 2017 - 2021. The workshop also facilitated compilation of an operational picture of regional SAR operations and available SAR arrangements and resources.

In addition, the workshop acknowledged the value and the potential of the Pacific Women in Maritime Association (PacWIMA) and national chapters in pursuing accident prevention measures, public awareness and education in the area of safety at sea; and invited PICTs to engage PacWIMA and national chapters in community work where possible.

The workshop was hosted by the United States Cost Guard Fourteenth District in Honolulu, Hawaii, with plenary sessions taking place in the Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Centre for Security Studies (APCSS). The workshop was co-sponsored by the Governments of China, New Zealand and the United States of America, and supported by the Pacific Search and Rescue Steering Committee (PacSAR SC). Additionally, in-kind contributions were also provided by the Governments of Australia, France, New Zealand and the United States for the Mass Rescue Operations exercise, which involved four aircrafts including one helicopter, (provided by Australia, France, New Zealand and the United States) and three surface search units and other support facilities (provided by the United States).

 

Cleaning up marine litter

30/07/2019 

An inaugural female-led beach clean-up exercise in east and southern Africa has helped raise awareness of the problem that marine litter poses to the environment. In Kenya alone, the beach-clean up collected 337 kg of rubbish, generated from land-based activities. The day was led by members from the IMO-supported Association for Women in the Maritime Sector in Eastern and Southern Africa region (WOMESA), together with industry and local communities. Organized in celebration of the African Day of Seas and Oceans, the clean-up (27 July) also served to highlight the important role of African women in marine conservation for sustainable livelihoods.

IMO has adopted an action plan to address marine litter from ships and is committed to supporting the achievement of targets to prevent and reduce marine pollution of all kinds, including marine debris, set out in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14.

Human carelessness and pollution, such as the dumping of plastic in waterways, has devastating consequences on marine life and this is a particular problem in the marine and coastal areas in Africa  - which are also are among the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change in the world, mainly attributed to the low adaptive capacity in the continent. 


 

Timor Leste benefits from STCW training

26/07/2019 

The safety and security of life at sea, protection of the marine environment and over 90% of the world's trade depends on the professionalism and competence of seafarers. That is why IMO's International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), must be ratified and then implemented properly.

IMO provides member states with training and capacity building, to support ratification and implementation of IMO treaties.  In Tibar, Timor-Leste (July 22-26), IMO held a workshop on the ratification and effective implementation of the STCW Convention where participants from various government and port agencies learned how they would be able to effectively implement the provisions of the 1978 STCW Convention, as amended, to achieve the knowledge and skills demanded by increasingly sophisticated shipping industry. 

As of 2019, 164 nations, representing 99.2 percent of world shipping tonnage, have ratified the STCW treaty. Timor-Leste became a Member of IMO in 2005.


 

IMO/Chile agreement to expand capacity building in the Caribbean

24/07/2019 

​IMO has signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Republic of Chile, to extend Chile's technical assistance to countries in the Caribbean region, in addition to Latin America. The MoU on Technical Cooperation, signed by the Directorate General of Maritime Territory and Merchant Marine (DIRECTEMAR) of the Republic of Chile, replaces earlier MoUs (signed in 2002 and 2005) and strengthens the collaboration between IMO and DIRECTEMAR for the provision of technical assistance in the Latin America and the Caribbean Region. This will particularly support the provision of experts (including Spanish-speaking experts) to deliver training in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Examples of IMO training supported by DIRECTEMAR include the provisions of expert for a needs assessment mission in Colombia for the effective implementation of its search and rescue plan (April 2019); a regional workshop to raise awareness of the UN 2030 Agenda and ensure that the maritime sector is fully integrated into the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF), which is the main platform for the collaboration of the UN system at country level (Chile, October 2018, pictured below)); the provision of an expert for the delivery of a regional workshop on the general principles of drafting maritime legislation to implement IMO Conventions, to be held in Guayaquil, Ecuador (5-9 August 2019); and a planned workshop on the ratification and implementation of IMO's air pollution and energy efficiency regulations (MARPOL Annex VI), to be held in Viña del Mar, Chile (30 September-2 October 2019). The new MoU with DIRECTEMAR will help ensure further similar activities are supported in the Caribbean, as well as in Latin America.

The MoU was signed (pictured, top)) by Vice-Admiral Ignacio Mardones Costa, Director General of DIRECTEMAR and Mr. Juvenal J.M. Shiundu, Acting Director, Technical Cooperation Division, IMO, at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom (18 July). The signing ceremony was attended by representatives of the following countries: Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Chile, France, El Salvador, Guyana, Jamaica, the Netherlands, Panama, Saint Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago, and the territories of Aruba (the Netherlands), Bermuda (United Kingdom), Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, Saba (the Netherlands), French Guiana (France), Montserrat (United Kingdom) and Sint Maarten.  

 

Building good maritime security in the Pacific

23/07/2019 

​Good maritime and port security is the enabler for maritime and economic development through maritime trade. It can be taken for granted when it works, but maintaining good security is essential. To support this, IMO and the Pacific Community, in collaboration with the Government of Vanuatu, are holding a Regional Maritime Security Workshop in Port Vila, Vanuatu (22-25 July).  

The workshop coincides with IMO Secretary General Kitack Lim's visit to Vanuatu, Fiji and Australia - the first time an IMO Secretary General visits the South Pacific (photos).

The regional workshop brings together Heads of Designated Authorities and port facility security officers (PFSOs) from 14 countries to discuss ways to cooperate at the national level to provide the necessary support required in order to take ownership of the implementation and compliance with the provisions of IMO's maritime security regime, including SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. Several port operators are also attending. Participants will improve their knowledge and to perform maritime security duties, as well as acquiring the knowledge and skills to train others with similar responsibilities.

The first two days aim to provide PFSOs with essential knowledge, confidence and tools to be able to address nonconformities that are commonly identified during security audits and assessment. This includes carrying out of risk assessments, coordinating drills and exercises, and delivering security training.

The last two days bring together the Heads of Maritime Administrations and PFSOs to review implementation of maritime security instruments in the region, share best practices and experiences, promote cooperation between port and designated authorities, identify challenges and propose solutions for effective and coordinated implementation of maritime security at the national level. The workshop will include testing a a verification manual  - a new tool for officials of the Designated Authorities under the ISPS Code.

Guest speakers from the US Coast Guard International Port Security Programme, as well as Australia's Maritime Safety Agency and Maritime New Zealand are also at the workshop. 

 

Liability regime training in Costa Rica

22/07/2019 

​The IMO instruments covering liability and compensation for damage, such as pollution, caused by ships are a key element in the global treaty regime adopted by IMO. A national workshop in Costa Rica (16-18 July) provided an opportunity for national participants to learn about the relevant treaties, their principles and implementation, with an additional focus on compensation and claims.

The course covered the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage (CLC),and the International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution Damage (FUND) regime; the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims (LLMC); the International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage and the International Convention on Liability and Compensation for Damage in Connection with the Carriage of Hazardous and Noxious Substances by Sea (HNS). To date, Costa Rica is only party to the CLC convention.

The workshop was organized by IMO in collaboration with IOPC Funds, P&I Clubs and Prefectura Naval Argentina, and is being implemented by IMO's Regional partner The Central American Commission of Maritime Transport (COCATRAM). It was hosted by the Maritime Authority of Costa Rica.

 

Further accessions for two important IMO instruments

18/07/2019 

Saudi Arabia has acceded to two important IMO treaties – the 1988 Protocol to the International Convention on Load Lines and the Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks.

The 1988 Load Lines protocol harmonizes the Load Lines Convention's survey and certification requirement with those contained in the SOLAS and MARPOL conventions and revises certain regulations in the technical Annexes to the convention.

The Nairobi Convention provides the legal basis for States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks that may have the potential to affect adversely the safety of lives, goods and property at sea, as well as the marine environment.

A delegation from Saudi Arabia, led by HRH Prince Khaled bin Bandar bin Sultan Al Saud, deposited the instruments or accession with IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim during the 122nd meeting of the IMO Council in London this week (15-19 July).


 

Germany accedes to ship recycling convention

16/07/2019 

​Germany is the latest country to accede to IMO's treaty for safe and environmentally-sound ship recycling – the Hong Kong Convention.

The Convention covers the design, construction, operation and maintenance of ships, and preparation for ship recycling in order to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships.

Under the treaty, ships to be sent for recycling are required to carry an inventory of hazardous materials, specific to each ship. Ship recycling yards are required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", specifying the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory.

Mr. Reinhard Klingen, Director-General Waterways and Shipping in the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure of Germany, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (16 July) to deposit the instrument of accession.

The 13 contracting States to the Convention represent 29.42% of world merchant shipping tonnage.

 

South Africa accedes to compensation regime for hazardous and noxious cargoes

15/07/2019 

South Africa has become the latest country to accede to a key compensation treaty covering the transport of hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) by ship.

When in force, the treaty will provide a regime of liability and compensation for damage caused by HNS cargoes transported by sea, including oil and chemicals, and covers not only pollution damage, but also the risks of fire and explosion, including loss of life or personal injury as well as loss of or damage to property. An HNS Fund will be established, to pay compensation once shipowner's liability is exhausted. This Fund will be financed through contributions paid post incident by receivers of HNS cargoes.

As required by the treaty, South Africa provided data on the total quantities of liable contributing cargo. Entry into force of the treaty requires accession by at least 12 States, meeting certain criteria in relation to tonnage and reporting annually the quantity of HNS cargo received in a State. The treaty requires a total quantity of at least 40 million tonnes of cargo contributing to the general account to have been received in the preceding calendar year.

The Honourable Mr. Fikile April Mbalula, Minister of Transport, South Africa, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London, (15 July) to deposit the instrument of accession to the 2010 Protocol to the International Convention on Liability and Compensation for Damage in Connection with the Carriage of Hazardous and Noxious Substances by Sea, 1996 (2010 HNS Convention). 

The treaty has now been ratified by five States (Canada, Denmark, Norway, South Africa and Turkey).

 

Desktop Just-In-Time trial yields positive results in cutting emissions

15/07/2019 

​"Just-In-Time" (JIT) operations have the potential to cut the time ships spend idling outside ports and help reduce harmful emissions as well as save on fuel costs. This can be achieved by communicating in advance the relevant information to the ship about the requested time of arrival - allowing the ship to adjust to optimum speed. A desktop trial in Just-In-Time ship operations has yielded positive results, showing emissions can be cut considerably. The trial was conducted by members of the IMO-led Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA), at the Port of Rotterdam (10 July). 

Technical adviser Astrid Dispert said, "More validation is needed and ultimately a real-time Just-in-Time trial - which is what we are working towards. But the desktop exercise showed the potential and the clear benefit that early communication between ships, port authorities and terminals can bring as it allows speed optimisation during the voyage."

During the desktop exercise, a voyage between Bremerhaven and Rotterdam (247 nm distance) was simulated a couple of times. In the first business as usual scenario, the ship receives an update on when it is requested to arrive at the pilot boarding place at the first Calling In Point (when the ship is in VHF radio range, around 30nm from port). The time that the ship is requested to arrive at the pilot boarding place is dependent on a number of variables, including the availability of the terminal as well as pilots and tugs. But the information is often only sent when the ship is already relatively close to port.

In the second Just-In-Time scenario, the ship receives several updates much sooner in the voyage to Rotterdam, on when to arrive at the pilot boarding place. The ship can then adjust speed to its optimum speed. 

Comparing the two scenarios, 23% less fuel was consumed in the Just-In-Time scenario – a significant reduction in fuel and therefore emissions. 

Data from this exercise will be fed into a Just-In-Time guide being prepared by the GIA. The exercise was conducted by representatives from the Port of Rotterdam, Maersk, MSC, IMO and Inchcape Shipping. 

The GIA is an innovative public-private partnership initiative of the IMO, under the framework of the GEF-UNDP-IMO Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships (GloMEEP) Project that aims to bring together maritime industry leaders to support an energy efficient and low carbon maritime transport system.

 

Prevention of marine pollution talks in South Asia region

12/07/2019 

The benefits and implications of acceding to the 1996 London Protocol on the prevention of marine pollution by dumping of wastes and other matter in the South Asian Seas Region were discussed at a regional workshop in Dhaka, Bangladesh (10-11 July). 

The main objectives of the workshops were to inform relevant authorities of the benefits and implications of ratifying, implementing and enforcing the London Protocol. The purpose of the London Convention is to control all sources of marine pollution and prevent pollution of the sea through regulation of dumping into the sea of waste materials. A special emphasis was also placed on the protection of ports and ocean environment.

The regional workshop was followed up by a national workshop for Bangladesh (12 July), attended by around 30 participants from Government ministries, agencies, state enterprises and academia.

The regional workshop was attended by participants from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Lead by IMO and the South Asia Co-operative Environment Programme (SACEP), the event was hosted by the Government of Bangladesh in Dhaka.


 

Safety of ships and fishing gets a boost in Ghana

11/07/2019 

Fishing is considered one of the most hazardous occupation in the world and, despite improvements in technology, the loss of life in the fisheries sector is unacceptably high. 

In order to improve the safety of fishers and fishing vessels, IMO has put in place, over the years, several initiatives, culminating with the adoption of the Cape Town Agreement of 2012.

Accra, Ghana, was the host for a regional seminar (8-12 July), on "Ensuring Safety Of Ships and Fishing", to encourage discussion on promoting and ensuring safety in the fishing industry. The event also provided Member Governments with the assistance they may need in implementing the Agreement.

The 2012 Cape Town Agreement (CTA) will provide international standards for the safety of fishing vessels. It outlines regulations designed to protect the safety of crews and observers and provides a level playing field for the industry while setting standards for fishing vessels of 24 meters length and over.

Many Member States have observed a link between lack of safety at sea, forced labour and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The entry into force of the Agreement is expected to improve safety at sea in the fisheries sector worldwide. It will also be a useful tool in combatting IUU fishing and reducing pollution from fishing vessels, including marine debris.

In an important move, the Minister of Transport of Ghana, Hon. Kwaku Ofori Asiamah urged the Ghana Maritime Authority to set the process in motion for the ratification of the Cape Town Agreement. Fishing is an important industry for Ghana, a major exporter of canned seafood, including tuna.

So far, 11 states have ratified the agreement with 1,413 vessels out of the required 3,600 for entry into force. In Africa, only Congo and South Africa have ratified the Agreement.

The event was organized by IMO in collaboration with FAO, and Pew Charitable Trusts (Pew). It was attended by participants from nine countries in the West and Central Africa region.  

 

Enhancing maritime security in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden area

11/07/2019 

How do you deal with maritime crimes at sea - and how do you train others to do so? These are the skills being taught on the latest in a series of regional training of trainers courses on combating insecurity in the maritime domain. Participants from 18 countries* are attending the course, at the Mohammed Bin Naif Academy for Maritime Science and Security Studies, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (30 June - 11 July).

Participants are learning teaching skills. They are also becoming  familiar with how to deal with maritime crimes at sea, including piracy/robbery, drug trafficking, marine terrorism, weapons smuggling, and human trafficking. The training is being conducted by subject matter experts from the Saudi Arabia Border Guard, International Committee of the Red Cross/Red Crescent and IMO

The course is jointly organised by IMO and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia under the auspices of the Jeddah Amendment to Djibouti Code of Conduct. It is part of a training programme to prepare selected participants to acquire the necessary skills to deliver training in their own countries and regionally. This is the tenth course in a series under a sponsorship programme of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, through IMO. To date, 226 students from across the region have benefitted from the training, since 2013. 

* Bahrain, Bangladesh, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Mozambique, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen.

 

Working to limit lost fishing gear in the oceans

10/07/2019 

​Abandoned, lost or otherwise discarded fishing gear can continue to capture and kill marine animals and may cause navigational hazards – as well as contributing to the global marine litter problem. IMO is working closely with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on reducing marine plastic litter from fishing vessels, including fishing gear, as part of the IMO Action Plan on the Reduction of Marine Plastic Litter. This collaboration includes IMO participation at a series of regional FAO-led workshops on best practices to prevent and reduce abandoned, lost or otherwise discarded fishing gear.

Participants at the second regional workshop, in Bali, Indonesia (8-11 July), discussed the usefulness of developing a practical guide on the application of IMO's MARPOL Annex V for small fishing vessels and fisheries ports. This could help to promote port reception facilities for the delivery of fishing nets, the application of garbage management plans on small fishing ships and the use of reporting mechanisms for lost fishing gear. IMO addresses marine plastic litter in the oceans through both MARPOL Annex V (which prohibits the discharge of plastics into the sea from all vessels) and through the London Convention/London Protocol regime, which ensures that plastics do not enter the sea as part of any wastes allowed for dumping at sea.

The regional workshop, like the others in the series, focused largely on the practical application of the recommendations contained in the FAO's Voluntary Guidelines on the Marking of Fishing Gear (VGMFG)) in the countries of the region. Another opportunity to discuss the implementation of the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for the Marking of Fishing Gear will be during the 4th session of the Joint FAO/ILO/IMO Working Group on Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing and Related Matters, to take place 21-23 October, in Torremolinos, Spain from following the IMO-Government of Spain Ministerial Conference on fishing vessel safety and IUU fishing (21-23 October

The workshop was organized jointly by FAO and the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI).  Participants represented Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Timor Leste, from national and regional authorities responsible for fisheries, and from ministries of transport and foreign affairs. 

 

Committing to decarbonization in the Caribbean maritime sector

09/07/2019 

Government and private stakeholders have expressed their support for climate action in the Caribbean, with a focus on decarbonizing the shipping sector, during a regional workshop on Capacity Building for Climate Mitigation in the Maritime Shipping Industry, held at the Chaguaramas Campus of The University of Trinidad and Tobago (1-3 July). The workshop, the second for the region, was hosted by the Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre (MTCC) Caribbean - one of five regional centres established under the IMO-led, European Union-funded Global MTCC Network (GMN) project.

Participants were updated on pilot projects completed by MTCC-Caribbean, including a voluntary regional online reporting system to track energy efficient technology and fuel consumption onboard ships within the Caribbean. This has enabled the completion of baselines and databases, including for greenhouse gas emissions; for Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator (EEOI) for ships calling at Caribbean ports; for energy efficient technologies used on board ships calling at ports in the Caribbean; and for the type of fuel consumed by vessels within the region. Establishing the baseline is key, in order to then move forward with reducing emissions. 

Following discussions, many participants acknowledged the need to support and sustain the MTCC Caribbean beyond the GMN project duration. A working group was established to address identified challenges, including securing funding and obtaining full political support at the national and regional levels. The MTCC-Caribbean is seen as having a key role in propelling the Caribbean forward with  decarbonization in the shipping sector, in line with the IMO initial GHG strategy

The workshop was attended by more than 100 international, regional and local participants, from  Government ministries and agencies, including Maritime Services Division, Ministry of Trade and Industry and Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources; maritime administrations of various Caribbean States; major ports including Port Point Lisas (PLIPDECO) and Port of Spain; private sector stakeholders (including BP Trinidad and Tobago, Caribbean Shipping Association Carnival Corporation, Energy Trinidad Limited, Fulcrum Maritime Systems Ltd, Methanex, NiQuan and Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago); the Caribbean Marine Environment Protection Agency (CARIBMEPA) and the Women in Maritime Association, Caribbean (WiMAC); and the Research Institutes of Sweden (RISE). 

 

Empowering Women in Maritime Security

08/07/2019 

Twenty-three female candidates from developing countries and Small Island Developing States attended a Maritime and Port Security course (25 June - 8 July) at the Galilee International Management Institute in Nahalal, Israel.  IMO, together with the Belgian Government, supported the course which was in line with this year's World Maritime Day theme on "Empowering Women in the Maritime Community" and the 2019 Day of the Seafarer campaign "I Am On Board with gender equality".

The course addressed the various strategic, legal, logistical and technological aspects of maritime security, including the implementation of port facility security assessments, and the development of port security plans and procedures.  The training focused on key instruments including the IMO maritime security measures in SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code, and the ILO/IMO Code of practice on security in ports.

Participants also had a chance to visit the ports of Ashdod and Haifa, as well as Israel's northern sea border, in order to observe the local security set up and implementation of maritime security measures. 

Participants included  Port Security Officers, Ports Managers, and women employed by government bodies, representing some 14 countries*.

*Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, Fiji, Kenya, Kiribati, Liberia, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of the Congo, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Solomon Islands, South Africa, and Suriname


 

A key partnership to empower port women

05/07/2019 

More women are joining the maritime ranks in a variety of professions within the industry. To encourage this trend, IMO supported a training course aimed at female officials from maritime and port authorities.

25 women from 17 developing countries took part in the two-week "Women in Port Management" course, hosted in Le Havre, France (24 June - 5 July). The course covered lectures on port management, port security, marine environment, facilitation of maritime traffic, marketing, port logistics and other topics. Participants learnt about the necessary skills required to improve the management and operational efficiency of their ports.

Visits were organized to the Port of Le Havre and the Port of Rouen, giving participants the chance to experience for themselves the day-to-day operations of a port, with a view to applying this knowledge back in their respective countries.

The port management course was delivered through IMO's Women in Maritime programme, supported by the Ministry of Transport of the People's Republic of China and in partnership with the Port Institute for Education and Research (IPER) and the Le Havre Port Authority. It comes as part of IMO's ongoing and increasing efforts to support the UN Sustainable Development Goal number five: achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

This is the 15th training event of its kind. So far, 333 women have received training under this activity. Demand for the course has continued to grow substantially over the past years. 


 

Implementing IMO instruments

03/07/2019 

The Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III) brings together flag, port and coastal States, together with observer delegations, to consider implementation issues. At its sixth session (1-5 July), the Sub-Committee is expected to finalize updates to key instruments which assist in implementation, including the updated Survey Guidelines under the Harmonized System of Survey and Certification, the Non-exhaustive list of obligations under instruments relevant to the IMO instruments implementation Code (III Code), and Procedures for port State control, for adoption by the IMO Assembly at its thirty-first session in November 2019. A further draft resolution on Guidance on communication of information by Member States will also be finalized. 

The III Code is a key instrument under the under the IMO Member State Audit Scheme. Following completion of the analysis of the first consolidated audit summary report at the last session, the Sub-Committee is expected to consider a proposal for a new output on the development of additional guidance in relation to the audit scheme.

How to harmonize port State control (PSC) activities and procedures worldwide is an ongoing issue under consideration by the Sub-Committee, which will receive the report of a correspondence group. Preparations will be made for the holding of a Workshop for PSC MoU/Agreement Secretaries and Database Managers (scheduled to take place in 2020). At present there are nine regional PSC regimes. Particular attention will be paid to the forthcoming "IMO 2020" sulphur requirement, following the adoption of specific PSC guidance by the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 74). The Sub-Committee will also consider a proposal for a new output to develop a training manual for new entrants as flag State surveyors/port State inspectors.

Another key agenda item is the review and analysis of maritime casualties. The Sub-Committee will consider the analysis and review of 27 marine safety investigation reports, with a view to making recommendations for lessons learned and for any further regulatory work which may be needed. The Sub-Committee will also consider the need for a robust strategy on the wider collection and utilization of casualty data. 

The meeting was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim. III 6 is being chaired by Ms. Claudia Grant (Jamaica). Click for photos.

 

Addressing bioinvasions - GloFouling project sets to work in the Pacific

02/07/2019 

In a spate of activity since its formal launch in March, the initial phase of the Glofouling Partnerships project is now well and truly underway with a series of technical workshops in the Pacific. The key message delivered to participants was that once introduced, marine invasive species can be hard to eradicate - and invasive species represent a potential major threat to the Pacific Ocean's biodiversity and the ecological integrity of Small Island Developing States. The GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships project aims to protect marine biodiversity by addressing bioinvasions by organisms which can build up on ships' hulls and other marine structures.

Participants from South Pacific countries took part in a five-day regional workshop (3-7 June) in Suva, Fiji. This provided an opportunity to outline the main instruments which aim to prevent the spread of invasive species and address fouling on ships: the Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention, the Anti-Fouling Systems (AFS) Convention and the IMO Biofouling Guidelines. Implementation of these conventions and guidelines can help prevent the transfer of invasive aquatic species into the Pacific region. 

During the workshop, site visits to a dockyard in Suva provided an opportunity for participants to see at first hand hull cleaning/painting, and to see where fouling can occur in niche areas such as sea chests, bow thrusters or propeller shafts.

The regional workshop was organized by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), in collaboration with the Project Coordination Unit of the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships. The regional workshop was part funded by IMO's Integrated Technical Cooperation programme (ITCP). 

It was attended by representatives from Cook Islands, Marshall Islands, the Federate States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. The workshop included consultants and support from Maritime New Zealand, the New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), and the Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Fiji (10 June) and Tonga (12-13 June) - two of the 12 Lead Partnering Countries (LPCs) of the GloFouling Partnerships - hosted national workshops to review the programme of work and begin establishing national task forces. Both national meetings were attended by representatives from a wide range of government institutions and the private sector, such as the ministries of environment, fisheries, transport and infrastructure, port authority, biosecurity, port state control officers, dry docks, shipping agents and operators. Strong support was provided by the Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. One of the exercises of the participants was to review the institutions and stakeholders that should be contacted to take part in their National Task Force, to be set up in the coming months. The role of the national task forces will be to oversee the development of a strategy and action plan to implement IMO's Biofouling Guidelines and best practices for other maritime industries.

The GloFouling Partnerships will organize similar national workshops in the remaining Lead Partnering Countries in the coming months.

The IMO-executed GloFouling Partnerships project to address bioinvasions by organisms which can build up on ships' hulls and other marine structures is a collaboration between the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and IMO. Twelve  lead partnering countries (Brazil, Ecuador, Fiji, Indonesia, Jordan, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mexico, Peru, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Tonga), four regional organizations, IOC-UNESCO, the World Ocean Council and numerous strategic partners have signed up to the project. 

 

Peru accedes to anti-fouling treaty

02/07/2019 

​Peru has acceded to an important IMO treaty helping to protect the marine environment – the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships (AFS) Convention. The treaty prohibits the use of harmful organotins in anti-fouling paints and establishes a mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in anti-fouling systems.

H.E. Mr. Juan Carlos Gamarra Skeels, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Peru to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London, to deposit the instrument of accession (2 July).

The treaty now has 87 contracting States, representing just over 96% of world merchant shipping tonnage.

 

Strengthening emission limits in Thailand

26/06/2019 

Reducing atmospheric pollution from ships and improving air quality is an integral part of IMO's work. Under MARPOL Annex VI this principle is clearly enshrined. As a result a regional workshop on MARPOL Annex VI was held in Bangkok, Thailand (24-26 June).

The workshop, aimed at shipping stakeholders, strongly encouraged ratification and implementation of MARPOL Annex VI including regulations on ships' energy efficiency. Participants were reminded that proper implementation of the convention would have a significant beneficial impact on the atmospheric environment and on human health, particularly for people living in port cities and coastal communities.

The event also looked at new requirements for ships to cut sulphur oxide emissions, which enter into effect on 1 January 2020, marking a sea change in fuel used by ships. Participants also discussed port-related activities to facilitate reduction of GHG emissions from shipping.

The workshop was organized within the framework of the 'Energy Efficiency' programme of the Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP), with relevant contributions from IMO's major projects aimed at reducing atmospheric pollution from ships, namely GloMEEP and the EU-funded GMN project. 


 

Progress and extension for IMO initiative on low carbon shipping

26/06/2019 

A key IMO initiative supporting ship decarbonisation – the Global Industry Alliance (GIA) – is set to be extended to 2023, in line with the timeframe of IMO’s Initial GHG Strategy.

The extension follows two years of good progress by the initiative, whose 6th Task Force meeting took place in Gothenberg, Sweden this week (25 June).

The task force discussed developments in a number of on-going projects, including the upcoming release of the first of three ‘Energy Efficient Ship Operation’ e-learning courses, which will be made available free of charge. Work is progressing on the second course, which will provide guidance on how seafarers working in engine and deck departments can contribute to reducing fuel consumption. Course three will be aimed at shipping companies and ports and what they can do to contribute to energy-efficient shipping.

Just-in-time (JIT) ship operation was also on the agenda, including how to address existing contractual and operational barriers. The group discussed how the required exchange of data between ships, ports and terminal could be further incentivised – and agreed to reach out to the aviation industry to learn how, through global data sharing, the aviation industry has improved the reliability of arrival slots. 

The GIA is an innovative public-private partnership initiative of the IMO, under the framework of the GEF-UNDP-IMO Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships (GloMEEP) Project that aims to bring together maritime industry leaders to support an energy efficient and low carbon maritime transport system.

 

Supporting Kenya’s coast guard

26/06/2019 

​Senior officials from the newly established Kenya Coast Guard Services are undergoing training on coast guard functions at a national workshop in Mombasa, Kenya (24-28 June).

Fifteen participants are taking part in the training, which is using scenario development methodology and plenary discussions to highlight issues, identify insights and develop deeper understanding of effective ways to meet coastguard functions – with a view to enhancing maritime security in Kenya.

The training is organised by the United Kingdom and IMO, under the auspices of the Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct. It is supported by a joint team from the UK Maritime Coastguard Agency (MCA), Royal Navy International Defence Training (RNIDT), and facilitated by the British Peace Support Team Africa (BPST(A)) and IMO. Other international partners supporting the implementation of the Djibouti code of Conduct (Japan, Denmark and the International Committee of the Red Cross) are also in attendance and contributing to the discussions.

 

IMO celebrates 30 years of outstanding legal training

26/06/2019 

​The 2019 academic year marks the 30th anniversary of the Malta-based IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI). A special event (pictured, top) to celebrate the occasion was held at IMO Headquarters (25 June). Malta's Prime Minister, Joseph Muscat (bottom left), spoke of his country's continuing commitment to hosting such an important global institution, while IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim highlighted IMLI's firm commitment to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. See photos here.

IMLI's overall mission is to help build the legal capacity among IMO member states, particularly developing states, to fulfil their obligations under IMO treaties. It provides training in all aspects of international maritime law, as well as in legislative drafting techniques.

Its academic programmes include a Master of Laws in International Maritime Law, a Master of Humanities in International Maritime Legislation, a Master of Philosophy in International Maritime Law and Ocean Policy, and a cooperative Master of Laws in International Maritime Law and Immigration Law with Queen Mary University of London. Since the academic year 2018-2019 was completed, more than 1000 students from 146 States and territories have pursued studies at IMLI.

IMLI is firmly committed to gender equality and to empowering females to become part of the maritime industries. One notable claim to fame is that IMLI has an official policy of reserving 50 per cent of its student places for female candidates. In recent years, the female student population has actually outnumbered the male students.

Speaking at the celebratory ceremony Secretary-General Lim expressed his sincere gratitude to the Government of Malta, the many donors and other institutions, both public and private, without whose support IMLI's success would not have been possible. At the end of the ceremony, IMLI director Professor David Attard, received a letter of appreciation and commemorative award, to mark his many years of outstanding service.

 

Committed to implementation

25/06/2019 

IMO is committed to ensuring the implementation of all its treaties. By carefully matching the needs of recipient countries with resources available from donors, the Organization's technical cooperation programme is the essential component in helping all governments to fulfil their responsibilities. With a strong focus on capacity building and training, the technical cooperation programme makes a strong and continuing contribution to sustainable development.  IMO's Technical Cooperation Committee (TC 69) is meeting (25-27 June) to review activities carried out in 2018 and approve the Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme for 2020-2021. 

The planned 2020-2021 programme has a strong emphasis on achieving the targets set in the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. A proposed new global programme dedicated to maritime development and the blue economy recognises the potential of the maritime sector to unlock growth and promote sustainable development. 

The committee will also be updated on various programmes and activities, including the IMO Women in Maritime gender programme, which is particularly relevant to this year's World Maritime Day theme, "Empowering Women in the Maritime Community". Two special events will be held, one to launch the World Maritime University (WMU)-Koji Sekimizu PhD Fellowship on Maritime Governance and another one to mark 30 years of the IMO International Maritime Law Institute. All delegates will be encouraged to show their support for the international Day of the Seafarer, which falls on the first day of the meeting. 

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim opened the 69th session (speech), which is being chaired by Mr. Zulkurnain Ayub (Malaysia). (Photos)

The Hon Mr Anthony Loke Siew Fook, Minister of Transport, Malaysia, addressed the Committee, pledging Malaysia's continued commitment to supporting IMO's technical cooperation activities and to the World Maritime Day theme, empowering women in the maritime community. Malaysia handed over generous funds to support WMU, IMLI and the GHG TC-Trust Fund. 

 

Training Montenegro to combat oil spills

21/06/2019 

A national training course in oil spill response has been delivered in Montenegro by REMPEC, the IMO-administered pollution emergency response centre in the Mediterranean (19-21 June). The course was designed to prepare the competent national authorities to co-ordinate and manage responses and make decisions on strategies and tactics to be used in clean-up operations. It was aimed at supervisors and on-scene commanders.

The training course will help Montenegro implement the International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (OPRC 90), which specifically calls for states to establish relevant oil-spill training programmes. IMO has developed a range of "model" training courses to address all aspects of oil spill planning, response and management. 

This particular activity was part of a comprehensive plan to protect Montenegro and the Adriatic Sea against the effects of oil spills. In 2011, Montenegro adopted a national contingency plan which REMPEC helped to draft. This will be complemented by the Adriatic Sub Regional Oil Spill Contingency Plan (ASOSCoP)to be developed within a broader EU Strategy for the Adriatic-Ionian Region (EUSAIR). These, in turn, are encompassed in a wider approach (supported by IMO and REMPEC) in which Montenegro will prepare a national action plan to implement the 2016-2021 regional strategy for prevention of, and response to, marine pollution from ships.


 

Safety management training takes centre stage

21/06/2019 

IMO training on the International Safety Management (ISM) Code is underway for nine countries* in the eastern and southern Africa subregion. The code sets international standard for safe ship management and operation. Thirty-two participants are taking part in the event, which is hosted by the Tanzania Shipping Agencies Corporation (TASAC) in Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania (17-21 June).

The course is focused on how the code evolved and its importance in efforts to improve safe ship operation and pollution prevention. Participants are senior maritime administrations personnel responsible for conducting shipboard and shore-based audits for verification of compliance with the code’s requirements.

The training, which is supported by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, includes interactive country-specific presentations focusing on the administrations’ tonnage, type of vessels, knowledge and perspective on ISM code implementation.

* Ethiopia, Kenya, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania.

 

Preparation is the key in ballast water management

20/06/2019 

I​dentifying organisms and microbes in ballast water, as well as monitoring port marine life where ballast water may be released, are key for countries preparing to enforce IMO's Ballast Water Management Convention. The treaty involves measures to counter the threat to marine ecosystems by potentially invasive species transported in ships' ballast water.

A regional workshop in Malé, Maldives (18-20 June) is training participants from four countries* in compliance monitoring and enforcement of the Convention. The event also includes training on how to conduct a relevant risk assessment for implementing and enforcing the BWM Convention – with a focus on ship targeting for port State control and exemptions under a key regulation (regulation A-4) of the BWM Convention.

The workshop also included training on how to plan and conduct a port biological baseline survey using standardized protocols.

Find out more about the BWM Convention, including frequently asked questions and an infographic on complying with the treaty, here.

* Bangladesh, India, Maldives, and Sri Lanka

 

Spotlighting IMO's actions on climate change

18/06/2019 

IMO is at the UN climate change conference in Bonn, Germany (17-27 June), where governments are meeting to work towards significantly accelerating the pace of climate action. IMO is reporting to the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA 50) on the latest and ongoing work to implement the Initial IMO Strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships. The strategy sets out a vision confirming IMO's commitment to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and, as a matter of urgency, to phasing them out as soon as possible in this century.

Specifically, IMO has highlighted the achievements of the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 74), which approved amendments to strengthen existing mandatory requirements for new ships to be more energy efficient; initiated the Fourth IMO GHG Study; adopted a resolution encouraging voluntary cooperation between the port and shipping sectors to reduce emissions from shipping; and, importantly, approved a procedure for the assessment of impacts on States of new measures proposed.

Capacity-building and technology transfer feature heavily in IMO's work, including the continued successful execution of important capacity-building projects, the GEF-UNDP-IMO Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships (GloMEEP) and the European Union-IMO GMN (Global Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres Network). An international project to support the initial IMO GHG strategy has been launched - the GreenVoyage-2050 project, a collaboration between IMO and the Government of Norway. 

IMO's submission to SBSTA 50 can be downloaded here.

 

Diploma awarded to future maritime leaders

15/06/2019 

Students at the IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) marked the successful completion of an intensive year of studies at a graduation ceremony held in Malta, (15 June).

"Dear students, do not forget that it will be our concerted efforts that will ensure that our beautiful oceans are protected for future generations." said IMO Secretary-General, Kitack Lim who was addressing the graduates.

Covering a wide range of international maritime law courses - including the law of the sea, shipping law, marine environmental law and more, 51 students from 36 States have graduated, and enhanced their knowledge in international maritime law for the benefit of their countries and the international community.

This year, IMLI celebrated its 30th graduation ceremony at the prestigious Malta Maritime Museum, Vittoriosa.


 

IMO and UN Environment – working together to keep the Mediterranean clean

14/06/2019 

​A key IMO-administered pollution response facility in the Mediterranean is to undertake a far-reaching programme of activities designed to help address the adverse effects of shipping on human health and marine ecosystems.

At their bi-annual meeting in Malta (11-13 June), focal points for the Regional Marine Pollution Emergency Response Centre for the Mediterranean Sea (REMPEC), have agreed:

·  to continue developing and strengthening pollution response capacity and cooperation at national, sub-regional and regional levels

·  to explore and establish synergies between the Regional Plan on Marine Litter Management in the Mediterranean and the IMO action plan to address marine plastic litter from ships

·  to examine further the possibility of designating the Mediterranean Sea area as an Emission Control Area for Sulphur Oxides under MARPOL Annex VI

·  the need to define a sustainable and collaborative approach to implement the Offshore Protocol and its action plan effectively, and

·  to launch a wide consultation process to prepare a draft post-2021 Mediterranean strategy for prevention of, and response to, marine pollution from ships involving all coastal States and relevant regional organizations

The meeting marked the 25th anniversary of the Mediterranean Assistance Unit (MAU), a group of experts and centres of expertise that can be mobilised by REMPEC in emergencies, and welcomed its latest member, the Adriatic Training and Research Centre for Accidental Marine Pollution Preparedness and Response.

More than 80 participants attended the meeting, from IMO, 19 Mediterranean coastal states, the European Union/European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA), UN Environment, as well as other governmental and non-governmental organizations and shipping industry representatives.

Shipping activity in the Mediterranean has been rising considerably in recent highlighting the need for continued regional cooperation on pollution prevention and response. In particular, a rapid rise in cruise activity makes it now the world’s second busiest region for cruises. 

 

France signs up to fishing vessel training treaty

12/06/2019 

F​rance has become the 29th State to sign up to the IMO treaty on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel (STCW-F). The Convention sets the certification and minimum training requirements for crews of seagoing fishing vessels of 24 metres in length and above. It entered into force in 2012 and is a key pillar among the international instruments addressing fishing vessel safety. Ambassador Nicole Taillefer, Permanent Representative of France to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London, to deposit the instruments of accession (12 June).

 

IMO explores the gender agenda at Nor-Shipping

07/06/2019 

​In a year when promoting and empowering women is a dominant theme throughout the maritime community, IMO hosted a special event at the Nor-Shipping exhibition (6 June) to highlight the some of the challenges – and the solutions – around encouraging women to take up seafaring roles. 

An all-female panel of experts, with many years' combined seagoing experience, spoke of some of the issues they have faced and which still need to be tackled. Many were simple yet vital things. One panellist spoke of the absence of sanitary products on board (despite shaving equipment being readily available) or a means to dispose of them. Another mentioned the real threat of sexual harassment and even assault. Another said she had experienced a stream of belittling comments from fellow crew members and felt a continual need to prove herself.

But the overall tone was positive, with a strong feeling that a new generation of both male and female seafarers were no longer finding women at sea so surprising or difficult to cope with. There was a clear view that more female role models and mentors, as well as females in senior positions, were needed but these were coming through with the generational shift.

All the panellists spoke in inspirational terms about the rewards of a maritime career and praised the many networking and mentoring organisations now established for women in maritime. IMO itself has a long-standing gender equality programme and has helped establish seven regional associations for women in the maritime industries.

Earlier during Nor-Shipping, IMO's gender equality programme manager Helen Buni launched a new project with WISTA International to measure exactly how many women are working in the maritime industry. Encouraging more women into shipping is widely seen not only as desirable in its own right but also a vital source of labour for an industry frequently predicting human-resource shortfalls in the years to come.

This year, IMO's theme for World Maritime Day is "Empowering Women in the Maritime Community" and this is echoed in the 2019 Day of the Seafarer campaign which will ask maritime professionals regardless of gender to say "I Am On Board" with gender equality at sea.

 

A sustainable maritime future for Africa

06/06/2019 

A wide-ranging discussion during the "Africa@Nor-Shipping" event in Oslo, Norway (5 June) explored a host of topics related to unlocking the full potential of Africa’s blue economy. Three separate expert panels addressed competition among different maritime sectors, ocean governance and the importance of complying with international regulatory regimes, particularly IMO’s ship safety, maritime security and environment rules. 

Much discussion (photos) centred around viewing challenges as chances to grow, and the need to learn lessons from the past. Ensuring African ownership and participation was highlighted as a key aim. Speakers from IMO outlined the organisation's own extensive involvement in helping build institutional and technical capacity in Africa at the national and regional level. IMO is strongly aligned with a range of pan-African initiatives such as the 2050 African Integrated Maritime Strategy.

The need to turn adversity into opportunity was a recurrent theme. One panellist referred to the billions of dollars currently lost to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and the enormous potential those sums held for positive impacts – if they could be recovered or diverted. Discussion on law enforcement, security and regulatory compliance continually highlighted the vital need for a collaborative and holistic approach at national level. Different government departments and agencies with a stake in such areas must coordinate and communicate with each other. Countering a tendency for “thinking in silos” has been a cornerstone of IMO's engagement in Africa for many years. 

Looking ahead, panelists agreed that future maritime development in Africa must be sustainable – clearly spelled out as development that would continue to benefit future generations. Linkages to the Sustainable Development Goals were not just desirable but necessary. One speaker talked of the need to avoid "institutional paralysis". In this context, IMO outlined how it can help governments throughout the continent to galvanise, enhance and mobilise their resources to achieve sustainable development.

Participants were reminded that 38 of 54 African countries are coastal States – and more than 90% of Africa’s imports and exports are transported by sea: Africa’s future depends on healthy oceans and a sustainable blue economy. There was also a call for the African Union, which took part in the event, to take leadership in efforts to bring about this vision of a sustainable blue economy.

In keeping with this year's World Maritime Day theme, the final panel featured a lively discussion on the importance of promoting gender equality in Africa's maritime sector. Mindsets are changing, panellists reported, but not quickly enough. Gender stereotypes built up over generations need to be broken down if the full potential of Africa's blue economy is to be realised.

The panels were moderated by JJ Shiundu, who heads IMO’s Technical Cooperation division.

 

Safety matters

05/06/2019 

The Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) is meeting for its 101st session, with a busy agenda encompassing maritime autonomous surface ships, polar shipping, goal-based standards and other agenda items. A number of draft amendments will be adopted, including amendments to mandatory Codes covering the carriage of potentially hazardous cargoes: the MSC is set to adopt the draft consolidated edition of the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code (IMSBC Code), and a comprehensive set of draft amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code).The MSC will be updated on the regulatory scoping exercise on maritime autonomous surface ships, taking into account different levels of autonomy. On polar shipping, the MSC is expected to approve draft guidance for navigation and communication equipment intended for use on ships operating in polar waters and  further consider how to move forward with developing requirements for ships operating in polar waters but not currently covered by the Polar Code. A new agenda item will look at fuel oil safety. A range of guidance and guidelines will be approved, including those related to standardization and performance standards for navigational equipment, linked to the development of e-navigation.   

The MSC was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Mr. Brad Groves (Australia). Read more here. Click for photos. 

 

“Sustainable and balanced” – IMO Secretary-General outlines blueprint for blue growth

04/06/2019 

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim delivered a strong reminder about the vital importance of balanced and sustainable development to delegates at the Ocean Leadership conference at the Nor-Shipping 2019 conference in Oslo today (4 June). 

In a keynote address, Mr Lim spoke of the Sustainable Development Goals as a unifying factor breathing life into global efforts to improve the lives of people everywhere. He confirmed IMO’s strong commitment to the 2030 Sustainability Agenda and reminded delegates that IMO's environment regulations were driving many of the technology innovations being showcased at the Nor-Shipping exhibition.

He highlighted moves to cut greenhouse gas emissions, reducing the sulphur content of ships' fuel oil, requiring strict ballast water management and adopting the Polar Code as outstanding recent examples of IMO's own sustainability agenda.

"Events such as this", he said, "remind us that the world is no longer prepared to accept services or industries that are simply cost-effective. We now demand them to be green, clean and energy-efficient and safe. Through IMO, governments ensure that shipping is responding to that challenge."

Mr Lim also took the opportunity to reiterate his strong personal support for the themes of this year's World Maritime Day and Day of the Seafarer, both of which deal with gender equality in the maritime community.

 

Laying the legal groundwork to protect Viet Nam's seas

04/06/2019 

​IMO is supporting Viet Nam in its work to apply two IMO treaties aimed at protecting the marine environment. Under the MEPSEAS* project, a first national training course in Hai Phong, Viet Nam (3-7 June) is dealing with legal implementation of the Ballast Water Management (BWM) and Anti-Fouling Systems (AFS) conventions.

Participants are key personnel involved in developing national policies and drafting national regulation. They are being trained on developing the legal, policy and institutional framework to implement the priority conventions the country has chosen under the MEPSEAS project.

The workshop follows the regional train-the-trainer workshop held in Singapore at the end of May. It is being delivered by a team of international and national experts, and includes hands-on training on drafting regulations using templates and models developed by IMO. The event is being run in partnership with the Viet Nam Maritime Administration (VINAMARINE). 

* The Marine Environment Protection of the South-East Asian Seas project is run by IMO with funding support from Norad – find out more at mepseas.imo.org

 

The Polar Code - from theory to practice

04/06/2019 

IMO was on hand to offer advice and guidance at the third edition of the Arctic Council's Arctic Shipping Best Practice Information Forum, held in London, United Kingdom (3-4 June). The Forum supports the effective implementation of IMO's Polar Code. This year's theme was "'From Theory to Practice" and provided an opportunity for sharing of best practices and experiences. The Forum was attended by representatives from a range of stakeholders with an interest in safe and environmentally sound Arctic shipping, including shipowners and operators, regulators, classification societies, marine insurers, and indigenous and local communities. 

In a video message to open the meeting, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said, " IMO is fully aware of the benefits of a collaborative approach and its objectives can only be met if all stakeholders are involved and take on their responsibilities."

IMO recently became an Arctic Council Observer, which will further strengthen the two organizations' efforts in support of sustainable Arctic shipping.

The Arctic Shipping Best Practice Information Forum was established in 2017 by the eight Arctic States (Canada, the Kingdom of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, the Russian Federation, Sweden and the United States) to help raise awareness and to promote the effective implementation of the Polar Code. The Forum's web portal, www.arcticshippingforum.is, provides links to information essential to implementation of and compliance with the Polar Code, including hydrographic, meteorological, and ice data information needed to plan for safe and environmentally sound navigation in the Arctic. The forum event was hosted by the United States, at its Embassy in London.  

 

Multilingualism for transparency and communication

31/05/2019 

Multilingual communication is essential in bringing the work of the United Nations closer to the world’s citizens, fostering trust among Member States and facilitating informed decision-making. By making information available in all official languages, the language and conference services enable their organisations to communicate better, and to be more open, accountable and participatory.

IMO confirmed its commitment to multilingualism at the International Annual Meeting on Language Arrangements, Documentation and Publication (IAMLADP) in Brussels, Belgium (27-29 May). IAMLADP is an international forum and network of managers of international organizations employing conference and language service providers.

IMO joined representatives of 50 international organizations and participated in sessions on data governance in conference services, how to enhance accessibility for persons with disabilities to conferences and meetings of the United Nations system, artificial intelligence and other new technologies in the field of language and conference services and inclusive communication, among others. The IMO delegation also attended parallel peer-learning sessions on specific topics related to translation, interpretation and conference management. The meeting adopted the Brussels statement on multilingualism. The European Union hosted the event.

IMO also participated in the annual Joint Inter-Agency Meeting on Computer-Assisted Translation and Terminology (JIAMCATT), in Luxembourg (13-15 May 2019), joining participants from national and international organizations, including the United Nations and many of its specialized agencies and of the Coordinated Organizations (OECD, NATO, Interpol) as well as EU institutions. Governments were also represented, as well as the University Contact Group of IAMLADP. The meeting was hosted by the European Commission’s Translation Centre for the Bodies of the European Union.

JIAMCATT 2020 will be hosted by IMO in London.

 

Ensuring pollution response preparedness in the Adriatic

31/05/2019 

​Planning for any marine pollution incident requires ongoing communication, collaboration and cooperation. Regional and sub-regional contingency planning is an effective way to share resources and expertise. This was in evidence at the IMO-supported 4th edition of the Adriatic Oil Spill Conference (ADRIASPILLCON 2019), held in Opatija, Croatia (28-30 May).  

REMPEC, the IMO-administered pollution emergency response centre in the Mediterranean, shared its extensive experience and expertise in building capacity on oil spill preparedness and response in the wider Mediterranean region and in supporting other sub-regional contingency plans.

The regional conference provided an opportunity for States to discuss the level of preparedness of the region to respond to oil and chemical marine pollution, as well as to consider the mitigation of the risk and challenges of (future) offshore activities in the Adriatic Sea.

Participants at the conference represented States; regional and international institutions; the oil, chemical and shipping industries; academia; individual experts; specialised companies and equipment manufacturers. IMO funded the particiaption of six representatives from Albania, Bosnia  and Herzegovina and Montenegro, through its Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP).

 

Drilling for security

30/05/2019 

​A live security drill at a cruise ship terminal in Mexico has given participants the opportunity to hone their skills and assess where any improvements can be made. The exercise, including a simulated bomb threat, was part of a workshop on Maritime Security Drills and Exercises, delivered by the Mexican National Maritime Authority (SEMAR) and the organizers of XIII International Forum on Maritime and Port Security (PBIP Forum), in cooperation with IMO, in Cozumel, Mexico (27-30 May) at the Cozumel Cruise terminal. Participants in the drills and workshop included the cruise terminal port facility security officers, the ship security officers, the navy, bomb squad and others. (Video)

IMO also participated in the PBIP forum, with Gisela Vieira outlining the Organization's work on capacity building through its global programme on maritime security,and reflecting on this year's World Maritime Day theme, "Empowering Women in the Maritime Community". 

The PBIP fora serve as a cooperation network in maritime and port security, to help achieve the full, effective and uniform application of the requirements of IMO's International ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. Participants include government officials, PFSOs and senior-level directors and managers representing the main ports and port facilities and the industry in Latin-America.

 

Training for healthy seas in South-East Asia

30/05/2019 

Seven developing countries* in South-East Asia are receiving training to help implement key IMO marine environment protection treaties at a workshop in Singapore (28-30 May). Under the MEPSEAS project, launched last year, participants are gaining the skills to train others in their countries on how to apply IMO measures to protect seas in the region.

The workshop is focusing on regulations in the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL); the Anti-Fouling Systems Convention; the London dumping of wastes at sea convention and protocol; and the Ballast Water Management Convention.

Find out more about MEPSEAS at mepseas.imo.org

*Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippine, Thailand, Vietnam.

 

Growing blue

24/05/2019 

What is maritime development and why is it important? Isn’t one of the biggest challenges the failure to appreciate the value of the maritime sector? These are the questions being raised by IMO at the Growing Blue Conference in Maputo, Mozambique (23-24 May).

“Ultimately, more efficient shipping, working in partnership with a port sector supported by governments, will be a major driver towards global stability and sustainable development for the good of all people” said IMO’s Chris Trelawny, speaking at the event. 

IMO’s Maritime Development programme is assisting countries to grow sustainable blue economies and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by working to help IMO Member States to develop innovative policies and strategies to respond to the needs of countries at the national, regional and global levels. This includes supporting development of national port and shipping sectors, promoting seafaring and shipping-related work as viable employment options for young people, both male and female, and facilitating regional trade by sea to foster manufacturing and export of finished products in addition to raw materials, with resulting benefits including increased and sustainable employment opportunities ashore.

More than 500 participants, including UN Special Envoy for Oceans, Peter Thomson, various Ministers and the Presidents of Mozambique and the Seychelles took part in the Conference. It builds on the Sustainable Blue Economy Conference held in Kenya in November 2018, which featured forward-looking IMO side events on the sustainable blue economy; integrating women in the maritime sector; and reducing GHG emissions from ships.

Find out more about IMO and the Sustainable Development Goals, here.

 

Teenagers get to grip with oil spill prevention

24/05/2019 

Discussions on oil pollution prevention, preparedness and response took centre stage this week (20-24 May) at the latest edition of Spillcon 2019 in Perth, Australia.

The forum included sessions on cause and prevention, response management and environmental issues.

A raft of high calibre national and international speakers addressed the conference on their particular areas of expertise. However, this year, the audience also invited 12 to 15 years olds to join the event to learn more about issues related to environmental protection, oil and chemical pollution, preparedness and response. The curious students took part in a range of activities some of which supported by IMO to educate them on the issue.

Other senior participants at the conference gained knowledge with a view to improving their respective technical competencies and developing capacity at the national level. 

Spillcon, which is part of a conference series partly organized by IMO, enhances regional and global knowledge on the issues surrounding global oil spill. The Conferences also provided a venue for international experts in oil spill prevention, preparedness, response and restoration to share information in a common forum.

IMO sponsored 10 participants* from Asia and the Pacific to attend the event.

* Federate States of Micronesia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Malaysia, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Timor Leste, Tonga 


 

Getting audit-ready in Cameroon

17/05/2019 

Auditing IMO Member States to assess how effectively they enforce key IMO treaties is an important part of the Organization's work to ensure its regulatory framework is universally adopted and implemented.

IMO's Member State Audit Scheme (IMSAS) is the subject of a national workshop taking place in Yaoundé, Cameroon (13-17 May).

The participants are made up of senior administration personnel involved in preparing audits for their government. Participants also received specific training on documentation needed to conduct an audit.  

The scheme became mandatory in January 2016. To date, 65 mandatory audits have been carried out, with a further 12 planned for later year. All Member States are required to undergo a mandatory audit within the seven-year audit cycle.

The workshop was organized by IMO and hosted by the Ministry of Transport of Cameroon. 


 

National maritime transport policy training for Saint Kitts and Nevis

16/05/2019 

Saint Kitts and Nevis is the latest country to benefit from IMO’s work promoting good maritime governance practice – through a National Maritime Transport Policy (NMTP) workshop, underway in Basseterre (14-16 May).

The event brought together participants from over 30 institutions, including ministries, State and stakeholder agencies to work towards a policy to help achieve the maritime vision of Saint Kitts and Nevis. Creating a NMPT policy will help the country’s maritime transport sector to be governed in a coordinated, efficient, sustainable, safe and environmentally-sound manner –contributing to the country’s sustainable socio-economic development and achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Find out more about the National Maritime Transport Policy concept, what it is and how it works, by watching IMO’s NMTP video, here.

The workshop was organized by IMO, in cooperation with the Department of Maritime Affairs of the Ministry of Public Infrastructure, Posts, Urban Development and Transport of Saint Kitts and Nevis, with support from the World Maritime University (WMU).

 

Malta accedes to ship recycling convention

14/05/2019 

Malta is the latest country to accede to IMO's treaty for safe and environmentally-sound ship recycling – the Hong Kong Convention.

The Convention covers the design, construction, operation and maintenance of ships, and preparation for ship recycling in order to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships.

Under the treaty, ships to be sent for recycling are required to carry an inventory of hazardous materials, specific to each ship. Ship recycling yards are required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", specifying the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory.

H.E. Mr. Victor Camilleri, Permanent Representative of Malta to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (14 May) to deposit the instrument of accession.

Twelve contracting States party to the Convention now represent more than 28.8% of world merchant shipping tonnage.

 

Shipping and environment in spotlight as IMO Committee meets

13/05/2019 

IMO’s key environment protection meeting has opened for its 74th session (13-17 May). The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships is a key agenda item, following up on the initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships. A working group is expected to be established, continuing the work of an intersessional meeting which met last week (7-10) May. The fourth IMO GHG study is expected to be initiated, the procedure for assessing the impact on States of new measures will be considered and possible short-term measures will be discussed. 

A set of draft guidelines and guidance documents to support the implementation of the 0.50% sulphur limit from 1 January 2020 are set to be approved this week. The new limit will have major health and environmental benefits.  

Other important agenda items include: the  adoption of MARPOL amendments to strengthen requirements regarding discharge of high-viscosity substances, such as certain vegetable oils and paraffin-like cargoes; the follow up on the IMO Action Plan to address marine plastic litter from ships; implementation of the Ballast Water Management Convention; and approval, for future adoption, of draft amendments to the International Convention for the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships (AFS), to include controls on the biocide cybutryne.

Further information on the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), 74th session agenda can be found here. The MEPC was opened by Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Mr. Hideaki Saito (Japan). Click for photos.

 

Ship recycling needs the Hong Kong Convention

10/05/2019 

Ten years after the adoption of IMO’s Hong Kong Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, in May 2009, there has been progress with voluntary application of its requirements, but the treaty needs to enter into force for it to be widely implemented. “I urge Member States who have not yet done so to ratify the Convention at the earliest opportunity, in order to bring it into force as soon as possible,” said IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim, speaking at an International Seminar on Ship Recycling: Towards the Early Entry into Force of the Hong Kong Convention (10 May). The seminar was organized by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) of Japan in cooperation with the IMO Secretariat.

Speakers from industry and national authorities, including ship recycling countries, are addressing the seminar, which aims to highlight how to promote sustainable ship recycling and discuss what is necessary to move forward for the early entry into force of the Hong Kong Convention. 

The Hong Kong Convention covers the design, construction, operation and maintenance of ships, and preparation for ship recycling in order to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships. Under the treaty, ships are required to carry an Inventory of Hazardous Materials, specific to each ship. Ship recycling yards are required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", specific to each individual ship to be recycled, specifying the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory.

Secretary-General Lim highlighted the work already done by IMO to develop guidelines to assist in implementation, with a range of awareness-raising workshops, training and other similar projects, to help build capacity in ship recycling countries and establish the conditions that will enable those which have not yet done so, to ratify or accede to the Convention. In particular, the ongoing project on "Safe and Environmentally Sound Ship Recycling in Bangladesh" (SENSREC), funded by the Government of Norway and jointly implemented by IMO, the Government of Bangladesh and the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions (BRS), is in its second phase, focusing on building the country's institutional capacity and implementing the training materials based on Phase I. Meanwhile, the Government of Japan has been working with relevant stakeholders to improve ship recycling in South Asia.

To date, the Hong Kong Convention has been ratified or acceded by eleven States: Belgium, Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Estonia, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Serbia and Turkey. The combined merchant fleets of these eleven States constitute 23% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet and their combined ship recycling volume constitutes about 1.6 million gross tonnage (about 0.56% of the gross tonnage of the eleven contracting States' merchant fleet). Entry into force requires 15 States, 40% of the world's merchant fleet and their ship recycling volume constituting not less than 3% of the gross tonnage of these contracting States' merchant fleet.

 

Better prepared for maritime security incidents

09/05/2019 

Suriname is the latest country to benefit from IMO maritime security training. Participants at a workshop in Paramaribo, Suriname (7-8 May) took part in table-top contingency planning exercises involving a variety of maritime security issues. These included threats to cruise ships, border security issues involving ports, airports and land border crossing, as well as potential incidents involving proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and arms and drugs consignments.

The main objective of the exercise was to encourage a multi-agency, whole of government approach to maritime and port facility security and related maritime law enforcement issues – with participants working to identify gaps in national procedures or legislation, opportunities for improvement, and further needs for training or technical assistance.

The exercise took place following a request by Suriname to assist the country in strengthening its implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) – specifically those that fall within the scope of IMO’s SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code and/or the 1988 and 2005 SUA treaties (click for details of these treaties).

The workshop was organised in collaboration with the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (UNLIREC).

 

IMO gets observer status at Arctic Council

07/05/2019 

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has been granted observer status at the Arctic Council. This will allow IMO to build on previous cooperation with the Arctic Council and engage in close collaboration on a range issues related to shipping in the Arctic, in particular, search and rescue, pollution response and maritime safety and protection of the marine environment.

IMO has adopted the  Polar Code, which provides mandatory requirements for ships operating in the harsh environment of the Polar regions, to provide additional protection on top of existing mandatory rules, for ship design, construction, equipment, operational, training, search and rescue and environmental protection matters. IMO is currently developing develop measures to reduce the risks of use and carriage of heavy fuel oil as fuel by ships in Arctic waters. 

IMO's "Guide on Oil Spill Response in Ice and Snow Conditions", approved in 2016, was developed in coordination with the Arctic Council's Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response (EPPR) Working Group.

The Arctic Council is an intergovernmental organization which promotes greater coordination and cooperation among the Arctic States, among other things. The members of the Arctic Council are Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, the Russian Federation, Sweden and the United States. IMO joins four other United Nations system bodies with observer status at the Arctic Council (UNDP, UN-ECE, UNEP and WMO). The 11th Arctic Council Ministerial meeting in Rovaniemi, Finland, welcomed IMO as an observer organization. ​

 

How to cut port waiting times to reduce emissions

03/05/2019 

Data sharing is a prerequisite to enabling the successful implementation of “Just-In-Time” (JIT) operations – which can cut the time ships spend idling outside ports and help cut emissions as well as save on fuel costs. Participants at a roundtable meeting of IMO’s Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA) at IMO Headquarters, London (1-2 May), agreed that increased transparency of information through data sharing was imperative, while this should be achieved through standardized functional and data definitions. More frequent exchange of information would lead to better predictability of when a berth is available. The roundtable identified the need for a global, neutral, not-for profit data sharing platform, to allow frequent updates from terminals and vessel service providers on completion times. 

The roundtable also identified the potential benefits of regulating data sharing, while incentivising data quality.  

The roundtable meeting is the latest in a series organized by the GIA, to identify and discuss the operational, contractual and regulatory barriers – and potential solutions – to the uptake of Just-In-Time operations. Operational measures can help to substantially cut greenhouse gas emissions from ships. In 2018, IMO adopted an initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships, setting out a vision which confirms IMO’s commitment to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and to phasing them out as soon as possible.

The GIA is an innovative public-private partnership initiative of the IMO, under the framework of the GEF-UNDP-IMO Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships (GloMEEP) Project that aims to bring together maritime industry leaders to support an energy efficient and low carbon maritime transport system. The roundtable was attended by more than 30 GIA and non-GIA members (including shipping companies, ship agents, ship brokers, ports, terminals, bunker providers, nautical service provider, maritime organizations, maritime law firms).

 

Improving practices in oil spill preparedness and response in Liberia

03/05/2019 

Increased commercial and oil activity in Liberia's territorial waters has seen the number of tankers and other ships supporting the oil activities, rise significantly.

These activities are critical to the Liberian economy but pose a risk in the event of an oil spill. To address this issue, the Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF) has organized a workshop in Monrovia, Liberia (29 April – 2 May) which provided participants with incident management process information as well as an opportunity to test the newly learned material through an exercise.

The workshop also provided Liberia with the opportunity to update its Incident Management System and strengthened its national oil spill preparedness and response system. Liberia is seeing a growing number of fishing communities along its coast and has a responsibility to protect the livelihood of these communities by having a robust oil spill preparedness and response plan in place.

The workshop was hosted by the Liberia Maritime Authority (LiMA).


 

Breaking down stereotypes in a male-dominated industry

02/05/2019 

​Breaking down gender stereotypes in the maritime industry is not just important in its own right, it is also beneficial for the industry as a whole. That was one of the key messages to emerge from a special event held at IMO Headquarters in London yesterday, on International Labour Day (May 1).

In a year when IMO is highlighting its efforts to empower women in the maritime community, a panel discussion among five high level female maritime professionals and an invited audience of IMO delegates and other maritime representatives explored issues around female representation in a traditionally male-dominated industry.

Sakura Kuma (Executive Director of the Port of Yokohama), Fran Collins (CEO of Red Funnel Group), Katy Ware (Maritime Safety and Standards Director at the UK Maritime Coastguard Agency), Despina Theodossiou (CEO of Tototheo Maritime and President of WISTA International) and Kathi Stanzel, (MD of INTERTANKO) discussed what had inspired them to join the maritime profession and the barriers that still need to be tackled.

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim confirmed that IMO is strongly committed to helping Member States achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, highlighting SDG 5 on gender equality as one of the key platforms on which a sustainable future can be built.

Four maritime NGOs (ICS, BIMCO, INTERTANKO and WISTA) combined to organise the event.

 

Canada accedes to Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention

01/05/2019 

Hazardous shipwrecks can cause many problems. Depending on its location, a wreck may be a hazard to navigation, potentially endangering other vessels and their crews. IMO's Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention goes some way to resolving these issues. It covers the legal basis for States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks, drifting ships, objects from ships at sea, and floating offshore installations. Canada has become the 44th State to accede to this important IMO treaty.

H.E. Janice Charette, High Commissioner & Permanent Representative of Canada to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (30 April 2019) to deposit the instrument of accession.


 

New IMO model courses on IGF code and ship safety to be validated

29/04/2019 

IMO model courses are valuable tools that assist Member States and other stakeholders to develop detailed training programmes, to effectively implement the provisions of the 1978 STCW Convention, as amended, and to achieve the knowledge and skills demanded by increasingly sophisticated shipping industry. Three new model courses and one revised model course have been put forward to the Sub-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watchkeeping (HTW 6, 29 April-3 May) for validation: draft new model courses on Advanced training for masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on ships subject to the International Code of Safety for Ship Using Gases or Other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code); Basic training for masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on ships subject to the IGF Code; and Passenger safety, cargo safety and hull integrity training; and the draft revised model course on Advanced training in firefighting. The Sub-Committee will also consider the conversion of IMO model courses to e-learning versions, if appropriate, taking into account costs and other implications, and refining the process to develop, revise and validate model courses.
 
Amongst other items on the HTW 6 agenda, the Sub-Committee will continue its ongoing comprehensive review of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel (STCW-F), 1995, which entered into force in 2012. It is a key pillar among the international instruments on fishing vessel safety. Progress is expected with the review of all chapters and the preparation of an associated Code.

Under the agenda item on the “role of the human element”, the Sub-Committee is expected to look at developing guidance on the application of casualty cases and lessons learned to seafarers' education and training; and to consider reviewing and updating  the Checklist for considering human element issues by IMO bodies (MSC MEPC.7/Circ.1).

Implementation of the 1978 STCW Convention, as amended, is on the agenda, specifically with reference to the list of compliant   STCW Parties ("White List") and its review, based on the continuous compliance by Parties, as required by the Convention.

The Sub-Committee is expected to finalize draft amendments to table B-I/2 (List of certificates or documentary evidence required under the STCW Convention) of the STCW Code. The Sub-Committee will also consider developing a new joint ILO/IMO International Medical Guide for Ships (IMGS), as well as the establishment of a joint ILO/IMO Working Group for the development of guidelines on the medical examination of fishing vessels' personnel.

The HTW 6 meeting was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Ms. Mayte Medina (United States). Click for photos.

 

Sharing information – vital for maritime development

26/04/2019 

Better and stronger infrastructure for sharing information is vital to support maritime sector development and a sustainable blue economy. That was one of the key conclusions from a high-level workshop in Saudi Arabia for signatory states to the Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct (DCoC), the IMO-led cooperation agreement that has been instrumental in repressing piracy and armed robbery against ships in the western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden.

Participants agreed that, as a basis for effective regional cooperation, it was important to establish national information sharing centres to coordinate activities of national maritime security and law-enforcement agencies.

The workshop considered ways to enhance the existing regional information-sharing network to meet the increased requirements of the 2017 Jeddah Amendment, which significantly broadened the DCoC's scope to cover other illicit maritime activities such as human trafficking and illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. It was agreed that the functions and capacities of the three information sharing centres established under the DCoC should be assessed to identify where capacity-building assistance might be needed.

Participants welcomed the capacity-building work of IMO and a host of other international organizations, including the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), INTERPOL, the European Union and several individual governments and NGOs, and invited other organizations to offer their assistance.

The workshop, at the Mohammed Bin Nayef Academy of Marine Science and Security Studies in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, brought together 69 senior officials from 18 DCoC States* and supporting countries and organizations under the theme "Addressing maritime security challenges through regional cooperation and goodwill".

Workshop Chair, Vice Admiral Awwad Eid Al-Aradi Al-Balawi, Head of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's Border Guard, reminded participants of the need to address the root causes of piracy and other crimes. He highlighted the achievements made in the region since the DCoC and the Jeddah Amendment were signed, in 2009 and 2017 respectively.

*Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia, France, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Mozambique, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen

 

Protecting South-East Asian seas – website launch for ambitious IMO project

25/04/2019 

News and information about IMO's Marine Environment Protection of the South-East Asian Seas (MEPSEAS) project can be found on the newly-launched website: mepseas.imo.org.

The project, launched last year, is improving the environmental health of the seas in the region by supporting seven participating developing countries* to implement key IMO marine environment protection treaties. These treaties include the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL); the Anti-Fouling Systems Convention; the London dumping of wastes at sea convention and protocol; and the Ballast Water Management Convention.

IMO is implementing the project, with funding from the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad).

*Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam

 

Inspiring maritime women

10/04/2019 

“Use your power to empower”. “Say what you’re thinking”. “Listen to the ‘yes’ voice in your head”. “Return every phone call every day”. “Believe in yourself”.

This was the advice given by a wide variety of inspiring maritime women sharing their experiences of entering, working and leading in the maritime world at a special event (photos) on "Women, ports and facilitation" at IMO Headquarters, London (10 April).

The speakers presented on, and answered questions about, their work and the future for women in the field – identifying a series of key issues and recommendations. These include the importance of promoting female role models; increased access to education; mentoring; and taking advantage of training – with the overriding point being that work promoting gender equality needed to be done by both men and women together.

In his introduction to the event, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim emphasized IMO’s commitment to empowering women in the maritime community – this year’s World Maritime Day theme – and the importance of getting “all hands on deck”, both male and female, for the maritime world to continue to carry the world’s goods in a clean safe and efficient manner.

The event, organized by IMO and WISTA*, took place in the margins of IMO’s Facilitation Committee, which, this week, has been addressing the efficiency of shipping by dealing with all matters related to the free flow of international maritime traffic.

* Women’s International Shipping & Trading Association

 

Protecting Algeria’s marine environment

10/04/2019 

IMO training on the international treaty covering waste dumping at sea, the London Protocol, is underway for Algerian government officials and participants* from shipping companies and port authorities.

The workshop, held in Alger (9-10 April), is enabling cooperation between different sectors – allowing effective implementation of measures aimed at protecting the marine environment from dumping of harmful wastes at sea**.

Participants examined ways of effectively assessing the environmental impact of dumping of certain substances, including dredged material and effluents from desalination plants at sea. They also discussed the advantages of being part of the global network of experts and scientists linked to the London Protocol and their ongoing research on innovative sustainable techniques preventing marine pollution caused by dumping.

The event was organized by IMO’s Office of the London Convention & Protocol and Ocean Affairs with the Directorate of Merchant Navy and Ports of the Algerian Ministry of Public Works and Transport, with support from Environment and Climate Change Canada.

* 35 participants from ministries and administrations responsible for transport, environment, fisheries, tourism and foreign Affairs, as well as shipping companies and port authorities

** as set out in the London Protocol and the Dumping Protocol of the Barcelona Convention – the regional convention for the protection of the Mediterranean Sea established under UN Environment’s Regional Seas Programme

 

Malaysia ratifies treaty for enhancing free flow of maritime trade

10/04/2019 

The IMO treaty enhancing communication between ships and ports to help shipments move more quickly, more easily and more efficiently has been ratified by Malaysia. This brings the number of contracting States to the Convention on Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic (FAL Convention) to 123.

Captain Haji Samad, Alternate Permanent Representative of Malaysia to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (10 April) to deposit the instrument of accession.

IMO’s Facilitation Committee is meeting for its 43rd session (8-12 April) this week, coinciding with the entry into effect of new requires for all public authorities to introduce electronic exchange of information between ships and ports (see details here).

Find out more about the FAL Convention, including why it is needed, advice for governments, here.

 

Improving the efficiency of shipping

08/04/2019 

IMO’s Facilitation Committee addresses the efficiency of shipping by dealing with all matters related to the facilitation of international maritime traffic, including the arrival, stay and departure of ships, persons and cargo from ports. The Committee is meeting for its 43rd session (8-12 April), coinciding with the entry into effect of new requires for all public authorities to introduce electronic exchange of information between ships and ports (see details here).

Alongside other agenda items, the Committee is expected to continue its ongoing work on harmonization and standardization of electronic messages and develop Guidelines for setting up a single window system in maritime transport. The Committee will also receive an update on a successful IMO maritime single window project, which has been implemented in Antigua and Barbuda by Norway. The source code developed for the system established in Antigua and Barbuda will be made available to other interested Member States.

The Facilitation Committee was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Mrs. Marina Angsell (Sweden). Click for photos.

The Facilitation Committee session sees two side events focusing on trade by ship. A special event on "Women, ports and facilitation", co-sponsored by IMO and WISTA, will reflect on the 2019 World Maritime Day theme, "Empowering women in the maritime community" (10 April). A seminar on making cross border trade simpler (11 April) is co-sponsored by IMO and the International Port Community Systems Association (IPCSA) and covers “Values and benefits of a Port Community System, links to Single Window and WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement”. Read more here

 

Protecting Ukraine’s marine environment

08/04/2019 

Two important IMO treaties helping to protect the marine environment have been under the spotlight training workshops for Ukrainian officials in Kiev (1-5 April).

Participants took part in training on implementing and enforcing both the i) Ballast Water Management Convention (BWM), which aims to counter the threat to marine ecosystems by potentially invasive species transported in ships' ballast water, and ii) the Anti-Fouling Systems Convention (AFS), which prohibits the use of harmful organotins in anti-fouling paints and establishes a mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in anti-fouling systems. Participants were also introduced to ways in which to implement IMO’s Biofouling Guidelines.

The BWM workshop focused on compliance monitoring and enforcement, and provided training on how to plan and conduct port biological baseline surveys as well as risk assessments, including ship targeting for port State control and exemptions. The AFS-Biofouling workshop contributes to developing a national biofouling management strategy and action plan for Ukraine.

 

Global gathering of regional Women in Maritime Associations

07/04/2019 

“Education is the greatest engine of personal development”, said Ms. Lorraine Masiza (from Namibia), Chair of the Association for Women in the Maritime Sector in Eastern and Southern Africa region (WOMESA), speaking at the first ever meeting of all seven IMO regional Women in Maritime Associations (WIMAS).

This historic meeting took place on the sidelines of the third World Maritime University (WMU) International Women’s Conference, Empowering Women in the Maritime Community, Malmö, Sweden (4-5 April). 

WIMAFRICA and WMUWA also joined the gathering to share experiences and generate ideas for the future.

On the subject of education, Ms. Masiza also said that mentoring programmes were crucial in order to advance women and girls in the maritime sector. The key themes of training, visibility and recognition were echoed by representatives from the other WIMAS, who also highlighted the need for research and data, to help inform strategies to mainstream gender issues throughout the maritime sector.

Ms. Carol Schroeder of the WMU Women's Association (WMUWA) spoke about the network of past, current and prospective female students of the University. Recognizing the need to involve everyone in gender issues, the WMUMA currently has 11 male associate members.

The seven regional networks promote and improve gender balance in the shipping industry have been established, with support from IMO’s Women in Maritime programme.

IMO’s Women in Maritime Programme funded two representatives from each WIMA to attend the Malmö conference on Empowering Women in the Maritime Community. IMO's Women in Maritime Programme forms part of the Organization's strong commitment towards helping its Member States achieve the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goal 5 "Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls".


 

Be bold for change – how to empower women in the maritime community

04/04/2019 

Remove structural barriers, build good networks and support quality education to ensure no woman, no girl is left behind in the maritime sector where women remain significantly under-represented. These were some of the themes reiterated by maritime leaders speaking on the first day of the third World Maritime University (WMU) International Women’s Conference, Empowering Women in the Maritime Community, Malmö, Sweden (4-5 April), reflecting this year’s World Maritime Day theme.

Opening the conference, WMU President Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry called on the whole maritime sector to “be bold for change” in order to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 5 on gender equality. “We need to ensure a quality education is made available to everyone, including and empowering women and girls. No one should be left behind,” she said.

“To make progress we need bold and innovative initiatives to ensure we progress gender diversity,” said Helen Buni, focal point for IMO’s Women in Maritime Programme, which supports women to access maritime training and other opportunities, including through gender-specific fellowships for high-level technical training. Through this programme, IMO has facilitated the establishment of seven women in maritime associations across the globe to provide networking, mentorship and other opportunities.

Heike Deggim, Director of IMO’s Maritime Safety Division said while there had been some progress in female representation at IMO meetings amongst national delegations, the maritime industry needed more women, particularly in leadership roles. “There are infinite possibilities for a more fair and equitable workplace that takes advantage of the strengths that both genders bring to management and leadership,” Ms Deggim said. ”IMO recognizes that the shipping industry must reach out to every sector of the community if it is to attract the very best people to pursue a maritime career. Employing and empowering more women will go a long way to solving the challenges faced by the maritime industry, especially the predicted shortage of skilled seafarers, in particular officers.”

In a video message to the conference, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said, “The maritime world needs all hands on deck, both male and female, to continue to carry the world’s goods in a clean safe and efficient manner.”

Follow the conference via #maritimewomen2019

 

GPS rollover - 6 April 2019: are you ready?

02/04/2019 

Maritime users of the Global Positioning System Standard Positioning Service (GPS-SPS) are urged to check their systems ahead of the week counter roll over on 6 April 2019. Some outdated GPS receiver systems may cease to function properly - with potentially serious impacts on navigation.

The roll over occurs because the GPS system transmits time to GPS receivers using a format of time and weeks as a 10-bit value, which started from 6 January 1980, and can only count 1023 weeks. The previous roll over was on 21 August 1999, when systems reset and began counting towards week 1023 again. When the GPS system reaches week 1024, the system will revert back to week zero.

Some GPS receivers are known to be unable to make the transition from week 1023 to 1024. If the GPS receiver is outdated or has not been properly updated, the receiver will revert on 6 April 2019 to reading the week zero as August 1999. The internal clocks of these GPS receivers will experience a lack of absolute reference and may give the wrong time and position or may lock up permanently. Some of these GPS receivers are repairable with upgrades and others will become unusable.

Maritime users are advised to check the status of their receiver with their GPS manufacturer. IMO has issued a safety of navigation circular SN.1/Circ.182/Add.1 warning maritime users to take action for the roll over.

The GPS-SPS has been recognized by IMO as a component of the world-wide radionavigation system since 1996.

 

Georgia accedes to load lines convention

28/03/2019 

​Georgia is the 112th State to accede to the International Convention on Load Lines (1988 Protocol). Limitations on the draught to which a ship may be loaded are included in the treaty, making a significant contribution to the ship's safety. These limits are given in the form of freeboards. The treaty takes into account the potential hazards present in different ocean zones and different seasons.

The 1988 Protocol updates and revises the earlier treaty. The technical annex contains several additional safety measures concerning doors, freeing ports, hatchways and other items. These measures help to ensure the watertight and weathertight integrity of ships' hulls below the freeboard deck. All assigned load lines must be marked amidships on each side of the ship, together with the deck line.

H.E. Tamar Beruchashvili, Ambassador of Georgia and Permanent Representative of Georgia to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters in London (28 March) to deposit the instrument of accession.


 

Japan accedes to ship recycling convention

27/03/2019 

IMO's treaty for safe and environmentally-sound ship recycling has received another boost. Japan has become the 10th country to become a Party to the Hong Kong Convention.The Convention covers the design, construction, operation and maintenance of ships, and preparation for ship recycling in order to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships.

Under the treaty, ships are required to carry an Inventory of Hazardous Materials, specific to each ship. Ship recycling yards are required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", specific to each individual ship to be recycled, specifying the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory.

H.E. Mr. Koji Tsuruoka, Ambassador of Japan to the United Kingdom and Permanent Representative of Japan to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (27 March) to deposit the instrument of accession.

To help increase international awareness of the importance of the early entry into force of the Hong Kong Convention, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) of Japan in cooperation with the IMO Secretariat is hosting an international seminar on “Ship Recycling - Towards the Early Entry into Force of the Hong Kong Convention”. The seminar will be held on 10 May 2019 at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom. The seminar will discuss how to promote sustainable ship recycling and how to move forward for the early entry into force of the Hong Kong Convention.

The Contracting States to the Hong Kong Convention are: Belgium, Denmark, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, the Republic of the Congo, the Republic of Serbia and Turkey. They represent approximately 23.16% of the gross tonnage of the world's merchant shipping. The combined annual ship recycling volume of the Contracting States during the preceding 10 years is 1,709,955 GT, i.e. 0.57% of the merchant shipping tonnage of the same States. The Hong Kong Convention will enter into force 24 months after the following conditions are met: 1. not less than 15 States have concluded this Convention,  2.  the combined merchant fleets of the States Parties constitute not less than 40 percent of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant shipping, and 3.  the combined maximum annual ship recycling volume of the States Parties during the preceding 10 years constitutes not less than 3% of the gross tonnage of the combined merchant shipping of the States Parties.

 

Addressing fraudulent registration

27/03/2019 

​IMO’s Legal committee will discuss a number of proposed measures to prevent fraudulent registration of ships and other deceptive shipping practices, during its 106th session (27-29 March). This follows reports of fraudulent use of their flag by a number of IMO Member States.

Amongst other agenda items, the Committee will consider the growing number of cases of seafarer abandonment and the orchestrated action needed to address this issue. The Committee will be updated on the latest cases and review cases which have been successfully resolved, following intervention by the IMO Secretariat, the International Labour Organization (ILO), relevant flag States, port States, seafarers' States and other organizations.

The Committee will also begin its work on the regulatory scoping exercise of conventions emanating from the Legal Committee for the use of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS). Another important agenda item is on encouraging ratification and implementation the 2010 HNS Convention, which covers liability and compensation in the event of an incident involving hazardous goods. The number of ships carrying HNS cargoes is growing steadily with more than 200 million tonnes of chemicals traded annually.
 
The Legal committee was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Mr. Volker Schöfish (Germany).

 

Expanding collaborative efforts to promote maritime security

21/03/2019 

Members of three key regional maritime security agreements*, which IMO has helped to establish, are undergoing training on tackling maritime crime in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (10-28 March 2019).

Thirty participants from 24 countries** are learning theoretical and practical skills to deal with piracy/robbery against ships, drug trafficking, marine terrorism, weapons smuggling, human trafficking and more.

The course is organized by IMO and Saudi Arabia under the auspices of the Jeddah Amendment to Djibouti Code of Conduct and conducted by experts from the Saudi Arabia Border Guard, UNODC, INTERPOL and IMO.

The training is taking place at the Mohammed Bin Naif Academy for Maritime Science and Security Studies and is the first of three training workshops to be organized by IMO and the Saudi Border Guard in Jeddah during 2019 – with financial assistance from Saudi Arabia.

The series of workshops will enable participants from different regions  to share ideas and best practices in order to promote maritime security.

* The Djibouti Code of Conduct; the West and Central Africa Code of conduct; and the Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia (ReCAAP)

** Bahrain, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Mozambique, Myanmar, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa, the Sudan, Cabo Verde, Sri Lanka, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen

 

Progress in Guyana’s oil spill preparedness

21/03/2019 

​Guyana is the latest country to benefit from IMO’s continuing work to strengthen oil spill response capacity in the Wider Caribbean Region.

Guyanese officials from 28 different government agencies, environmental stakeholders, and local industry representatives took part in the REMPEITC-Caribe* training workshop (18-20 March) funded by IMO. Participants assessed Guyana’s oil spill readiness programme and further developed the National Contingency Plan for the country.

The workshop supports continued efforts by the Government of Guyana to ratify international conventions, develop contingency plans, and enact domestic oil spill legislation.

The event followed a sub-regional training which took place in St Kitts and Nevis last week and further workshops to support the Wider Caribbean Region on oil spill preparedness will be taking place throughout the year.

* The Regional Marine Pollution Emergency, Information and Training Centre for the Caribbean

 

Promoting good practice in spill preparedness and response

21/03/2019 

Increased maritime traffic as well as offshore oil and gas industries in west and central Africa means more risks of oil spill in the region. To strengthen the capability for preparedness and response of a potential oil spill, a workshop is underway in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire (18-21 March). The event aims to help participants with to ratify and effectively implement IMO conventions relating to oil pollution and liability and compensation.

Participants will be trained on how to best transpose IMO treaties into domestic laws. The workshop will also look at the technical context by which these conventions operate and the challenges they aim to address. The workshop will improve the capacity of these countries to protect their marine and coastal resources at risk from an oil pollution incident. The workshop is organized by the Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF).


 

Global alliance for low carbon shipping expands

18/03/2019 

A.P. Moller - Maersk A/S and the Panama Canal Authority are the latest entities to join the IMO-supported Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA). The GIA now has 18 members, including leading shipowners and operators, classification societies, engine and technology builders and suppliers, big data providers, oil companies and ports.

The new members signed up to the GIA during the fifth meeting of the GIA Taskforce at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom (15 March).

The GIA Taskforce meeting (photos) progressed work on several on-going projects, including on the validation of performance of Energy Efficiency Technologies, the assessment of barriers to the uptake of Just-in-Time Operation of ships and resulting emission saving opportunities from its effective implementation, as well as work on the current status and application of alternative fuels in the maritime sector and barriers to their uptake. The Taskforce was also shown a preview of an open access E-Learning course on the Energy Efficient Operation of Ships, which is expected to be completed and launched later this year.

The Taskforce also formalized the extension of the GIA until 31 December 2019 and agreed to develop a White Paper outlining a vision and potential priority areas for the GIA.

The GIA is an innovative public-private partnership initiative of the IMO, under the framework of the GEF-UNDP-IMO Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships (GloMEEP) Project that aims to bring together maritime industry leaders to support an energy efficient and low carbon maritime transport system. 

 

Getting to grips with national maritime transport policy

15/03/2019 

​The latest in a series of workshops on developing a national maritime transport policy has been held in Accra, Ghana (13-15 March). IMO is promoting the development of national maritime transport policy as a means to bring all relevant stakeholders together, and create a policy to achieve the maritime vision of a country and ensure that the sector is governed in an efficient, sustainable, safe and environmentally sound manner. This can help ensure a coordinated approach to a sustainable maritime transport sector  - which in turn can contribute to the country’s sustainable socio-economic development and the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. (Watch the NMTP video here.)

The Accra workshop involved participants from nearly 20 institutions, including ministries, state agencies and stakeholder agencies. Ghana has recently revised its National Transport Policy, which itself includes policy goals and objectives relating to the maritime transport sector. The workshop participants adopted a set of conclusions, among which they urge the relevant national authorities to initiate and lead the process for the development and adoption of a national maritime transport policy and related strategy.

The workshop was organized by IMO, in close cooperation with the Ghana Maritime Authority and the Ministry of Transport, with the active involvement of the World Maritime University (WMU). IMO and WMU officials facilitated the workshop. 

 

Keeping abreast of maritime security measures in Asia

15/03/2019 

Emerging maritime challenges were at the forefront of discussions at the 11th ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) Inter-Sessional Meeting (ISM) on Maritime Security in Da Nang, Viet Nam, (14-15 March).

Participants had the opportunity to exchange views on regional maritime issues, review progress of their maritime security work plan, and discuss proposed activities over the coming year. 

IMO took the opportunity to update ARF members on IMO's work in Asia and told senior maritime officials of potential future technical cooperation projects in the region. IMO also talked about improving the implementation, among ASEAN members, of maritime security measures, including the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS).

The forum also discussed three priority areas, namely maritime security and cooperation; safety of navigation; and marine environment and sustainable development.  More specifically they looked at patrols in the Sulu Sea, the importance of international cooperation and capacity building, as well as managing cyber risks in the shipping industry. 

The meeting was chaired by Australia, Viet Nam and the EU.


 

Strengthening oil spill response in the Wider Caribbean Region

13/03/2019 

Training is underway for oil spill response managers in the wider Caribbean region at a course* in St Kitts and Nevis (11-14 March).

Participants from 15 countries** are attending the IMO-funded event, which is focused on tactical aspects of spill preparedness and response, and applying incident management systems to assist effective coordination of spill response. The event is showcasing success stories of several countries in ratifying relevant international preparedness and response conventions, adopting national oil spill legislation and developing oil spill response capacity.

This training course supports the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the associated Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 14 – Life Below Water, by developing capacity to protect marine and coastal ecosystems.

The course is taking place under the auspices of REMPEITC-Caribe, the Regional Marine Pollution Emergency, Information and Training Centre for the Caribbean, which was set up under the UN Environment’s Regional Seas Programme for the Caribbean.

* IMO-OPRC (Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation) Level 2 Training Course

**Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Barbados, Cuba, Curacao, Dominica, Guyana, Grenada, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, St Kitts and Nevis, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela

 

How to monitor plastics in the oceans

13/03/2019 

​A new set of publicly-available guidelines for monitoring plastics and microplastics in the oceans will help harmonize how scientists and others assess the scale of the marine plastic litter problem. 

The Guidelines for the monitoring and assessment of plastic litter and microplastics in the ocean have been published by the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP), a body that advises the United Nations system on the scientific aspects of marine environmental protection. The guidelines cover what to sample, how to sample it and how to record and assess plastics in the oceans and on the shoreline, including establishing baseline surveys. They include recommendations, advice and practical guidance, for establishing programmes to monitor and assess the distribution and abundance of plastic litter, also referred to as plastic debris, in the ocean.

The guidelines include common definitions for categories of marine litter and plastics, examples of size and shape, how to design monitoring and assessment programmes, sampling and surveys. Sections cover citizen science programmes - which involve members of the public in marine litter surveying and research. There are detailed chapters on monitoring sea surface floating plastic and plastic on the seafloor.

The full set of guidelines is available to download free-of-charge from the GESAMP website here.

The guidelines can be used by national, inter-governmental and international organisations with responsibilities for managing the social, economic and ecological consequences of land- and sea-based human-activities on the marine environment.

The guidelines are a response to the hitherto lack of an internationally agreed methodology to report on the distribution and abundance of marine plastic litter and microplastics and directly contribute to the UN SDG Goal 14 on the oceans. Specifically, the guidelines are a response to target 14.1: By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including plastic debris and nutrient pollution. 

 

Sea-based sources of marine litter

11/03/2019 

Understanding the impact of plastic litter found at sea and how to get rid of it was at the heart of discussions in Nairobi Kenya, (11-15 March) at a side-event called Sea-Based Sources of Marine Litter, in the margin of the UN Environment Assembly.

Sea-based sources of marine litter, in particular from the fishing and shipping industries are a significant component of marine litter with severe impacts on the marine environment, food security, animal welfare and human health, safety and livelihoods.

IMO addressed the audience, showing how it plans to further tackle the issue through its action plan, adopted in 2018, which aims to enhance existing regulations and introduce new supporting measures to reduce marine plastic litter from ships.

Even though IMO pioneered the prohibition of plastics' disposal from ships anywhere at sea almost 30 years ago, it is constantly reviewing practices in order to improve them.  More details about its action plan was shared at the event, such as the use of adequate reception facilities at ports and terminals for the reception of garbage and its recommending that "all shipowners and operators should minimize taking on board material that could become garbage".

A minute of silence was observed, in honour of fellow UN colleague Joanna Toole, who had planned to be in attendace at this event, but was sadly involved in the tragic Ethiopian airline crash.

The event was co-organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), UN Environment, the Global Partnership on Marine Litter (GPML) the Ocean Conservancy and the Global Ghost Gear Initiative.


 

Addressing invasive aquatic species

11/03/2019 

​IMO contributes to the protection of biodiversity through its Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention, which requires ships to manage their ballast water to limit the spread of potentially invasive aquatic organisms. Work on the experience-building phase of the BWM Convention (EBP) was highlighted at the annual meeting (6-8 March) of the joint International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC) and IMO (ICES/IOC/IMO) Working Group on Ballast and Other Ship Vectors, which was held in Weymouth, United Kingdom. The group provides scientific support to the development of international measures aimed at reducing the risk of transporting non-native species via shipping activities.

The experience-building phase involves data gathering and analysis and the group discussed sampling and analysis work conducted by its members that could be submitted to the EBP. The group also discussed standard operating procedures (SOPs) for collection of treated ballast water samples, which were developed by the group and agreed by IMO’s Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR) to be included in the data gathering and analysis plan for the EBP. Moreover, the group highlighted progress in the development of a standard for ballast water monitoring equipment, which is expected to be further discussed by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC). 

IMO’s Biofouling Guidelines also address bioinvasions via ships’ hulls and contribute to protecting the ocean environment. The group discussed the review of the Biofouling Guidelines, which is to be undertaken by the PPR Sub-Committee. The group will input its views into this work. The review of the guidelines comes as IMO begins to implement a global project to build capacity in developing countries for improved implementation of biofouling management. The GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships Project was launched in 2018. 

 

Think equal: empowering women in the maritime community

08/03/2019 

​On International Women’s day 2019 (8 March), the International Maritime Organization (IMO) is putting the spotlight on women in the maritime sector. This year, IMO’s World Maritime Day theme is "Empowering Women in the Maritime Community", giving particular resonance to this year’s International Women’s Day celebrations.

The global 2019 theme for International Women’s Day - Think equal, build smart, innovate for change - focuses on innovative ways in which gender equality and the empowerment of women can be advanced, in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5.

IMO is committed to gender equality and advancing women in the maritime sector. IMO’s Women in Maritime programme has, over the past three decades, helped women reach leadership positions in the maritime sector and bring a much-needed gender balance to the industry by giving them access to high-level technical training.

Today, IMO launches a video trailer for a forthcoming film which will showcase success stories of how IMO’s Women in Maritime programme has benefitted women in ports, on the shoreside and on ships. A series of profiles of individual women also launches today, helping to inspire the next generation.

The trailer and profiles were unveiled to delegates to the Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment meeting and IMO staff, who gathered to celebrate International Women’s Day. 

 

IMO training for Central America maritime administrations

08/03/2019 

A regional workshop has provided senior maritime administration officials in Central America with the latest information on current and future developments at IMO. The training was organized by IMO and the Central American Commission on Maritime Transport (COCATRAM) in Medellin, Colombia (4-6 March).

The 24 participants* received detailed information about the activities within the IMO’s Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP) aimed at building capacity in the region to comply with international rules and standards related to maritime safety and the prevention of maritime pollution. The workshop also provided a platform for information exchange between Central America maritime administrations and facilitated the identification of technical assistance priorities for the region for the 2020-2021 biennium.

In the region, technical assistance and capacity building led by IMO will focus in the next two years on IMO’s search and rescue, pollution prevention (MARPOL) and Facilitation Conventions as well as on the development of national maritime transport policies (NMTP).

The Regional Workshop for Senior Maritime Administrators of the Operative Network of Regional Cooperation of Maritime Administrations in Central America (ROCRAM-CA) was hosted by the Maritime Authority of Colombia (DIMAR). Following the training, the V Extraordinary meeting of ROCRAM-CA also took place in Medellin (7-8 March).

* From Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. IMO, through COCATRAM, sponsored the participation of 11 participants through the Technical Cooperation Fund.

 

Sharing information to enhance maritime security

07/03/2019 

Sharing information among the various different agencies involved is vital for maintaining maritime security, especially where there is a strong multi-national element. That’s why IMO is running a workshop in Djibouti on maritime security in the Gulf of Aden and western Indian Ocean area.

The participants* are developing best practices to help develop common templates and standard operating procedures for sharing security-related information including on maritime crimes, legal frameworks, training programmes and national initiatives. These templates will form part of a toolkit to support collaboration between the existing reporting framework under the Djibouti Code of Conduct DCoC (a regional agreement against maritime crime in the Gulf of Aden and western Indian Ocean area which IMO helped to establish) and newly established centres in Madagascar, Seychelles and Saudi Arabia.

The activity supports the commitment by Member States in the region to build response capabilities at both a national and regional level, a vital step towards achieving a more safe and secure maritime environment.

The workshop is taking place at the Djibouti Regional Training Centre in Doraleh (3-7 March) and run with important partner agencies UNODC, MSCHOA/UKMTO, EU CRIMARIO and United States Naval Forces Africa. It brings together personnel from national maritime information sharing centres, joint maritime operation centres, maritime rescue coordination centres and other key international partners.

Find out more about the DCoC and Jeddah Amendment, here.

* From Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, United Arab Emirates and Yemen

 

Spotlight on IMO's gender programme

05/03/2019 

IMO's Women in Maritime programme and this year's World Maritime Day theme were given increased visibility at the Houses of Parliament, London, UK (4 March 2019), during a session on Women, Peace and Conflict Resolution. Information was provided on the strategic approach IMO has taken towards enhancing the contribution of women as key stakeholders over the last 31 years. IMO is strongly committed to helping its Member States achieve the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly SDG 5 "Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls". Some 2% of the world's 1.2 million seafarers are women.

There is ample evidence that investing in women is the most effective way to lift communities, companies, and even countries. Countries with more gender equality have better economic growth. Peace agreements that include women are more durable. Gender diversity in a team often makes for a more effective team i.e. some women are better piracy negotiators as those softer skills are more developed. The evidence is clear: equality for women means progress for all. 

The event was organized by Rotary International. 


 

Making lifting and winching operations safer

05/03/2019 

​Draft mandatory regulations to make lifting appliances such as onboard cargo cranes safer are being developed by the Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE), which meets this week (4-8 March). The Sub-Committee aims to finalise the draft SOLAS regulations and related guidelines covering design, construction, installation and maintenance of onboard lifting appliances and anchor handling winches. The rules are intended to help to prevent accidents and harm to operators and damage to ships, cargo, shore-based structures and subsea structures, as well as the marine environment.

On fire safety matters, the Sub-Committee is working to minimize the incidence and consequences of fires on ro-ro spaces and special category spaces of new and existing ro-ro passenger ships. Current SOLAS regulations and associated codes are being reviewed. The meeting is expected to further develop draft interim guidelines and draft amendments to the SOLAS Convention and associated Codes. The Sub-Committee will also develop amendments to relevant guidelines for the approval of fixed dry powder systems used on ships carrying liquefied gases in bulk. 

Agenda items related to life-saving appliances and arrangements include the work to develop the goal-based standards safety-level approach for the approval of alternative designs and arrangements for regulations on life-saving appliances. The Sub-Committee is also expected to finalize draft amendments to the Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code on ventilation requirements for survival craft and related draft amendments to the Revised recommendation on testing of life-saving appliances, to ensure a habitable environment is maintained in such survival craft. Another item on the agenda is the finalization of draft Interim guidelines on life-saving appliances and arrangements for ships operating in polar waters, to support the implementation of the mandatory Polar Code.

On-shore power supply is another item on the agenda. A correspondence group will report on its work to develop draft guidelines on safe operation of on-shore power supply to ships, also known as “cold ironing”, “alternative maritime power” and “shore-side electricity”. The Sub-Committee is expected to consider whether there is a need for relevant amendments to SOLAS. Plugging a ship into shore-side power - and turning off onboard generators - is one solution to reducing air pollution from ships, as well as limiting local noise.

The SSE 6 meeting was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Dr. Susumu Ota (Japan). See photos.

 

Promoting port security in Mexico

04/03/2019 

The second in a planned series of interactive workshops to prepare countries for a wide range of potential threats and security situations has been held, in Veracruz, Mexico (26-27 February). The interactive Port Facility Security/Port Security Officer Tabletop Exercise was run by IMO in collaboration with the Organization of American States Inter American Committee Against Terrorism (OAS-CICTE), following a successful pilot in Panama 2018. 

Participants in Mexico took part in a simulation exercise, designed to allow port facility security officers to develop their decision making skills in different situations, ranging from the simple to more complex challenges that require intervention and coordination with other departments or management of their respective international port or ports with the respective authorities.

The aim is to roll out this workshop in other Member States of the OAS in the future, through a collaboration between CICTE and Inter-American Committee on Ports (CIP) of the OAS, and IMO.

Ahead of the workshop, high level representatives of the relevant agencies with key roles in maritime and port security in Mexico met in Mexico City, Mexico (21 February) to discuss the need for better coordination and communication and to ensure the implementation of maritime and port security measures.  Representatives of a number of different government agencies - including Customs, Environment, Navy, Ministry of Justice, Defence, Police, Transport -  explained their role on maritime security and how capabilities could be strengthened by working together. During the meeting, OAS-CICTE briefed the authorities on their visits to the Mexican ports of Ensenada, Mazatlan and Progreso.   

 

Caribbean commitment to IMO standards to support the blue economy

01/03/2019 

​Caribbean States and Territories have re-affirmed their commitment to implementing IMO standards for safe, secure and sustainable shipping. This is part of wider efforts to intensify investments and harness the full potential of the oceans, rivers and lakes to accelerate economic growth, create jobs and fight poverty. Ministers responsible for maritime transport and other participants representing the Governments in the region* met at a High Level Symposium (27 February) in Montego Bay, Jamaica, under the theme, “Maritime Transportation: Harnessing the Blue Economy for the Sustainable Development of the Caribbean”. More than 90% of trade in the Caribbean is carried by ship.

Addressing the meeting, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim highlighted the importance of collaboration and cooperation in the region to implement IMO measures and support the achievement of the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals, to which the IMO is fully committed.

“The achievement of these goals requires strong collaboration and cooperation among all stakeholders. Our understanding of sustainable development today embraces a concern both for the capacity of the earth’s natural systems and for the social and, not least, economic challenges faced by us all. A prosperous, smart and green shipping industry can contribute to a blue economy from which we will all benefit,” Mr. Lim said.

The High Level Minister Symposium adopted a resolution, which highlights the need for commitment at the highest policy making level in order to harness the potential of the blue economy. The resolution supports IMO’s initiative for Member States to develop national maritime transport policies, recognising the vital role that a structured maritime transport policy contributes towards sustainable growth and employment in the maritime sector.

During his visit to Jamaica, Secretary-General Lim visited the Caribbean Maritime University in Kingston, Jamaica, where he toured the facilities and met cadets.

Mr. Lim also met the Hon Robert Montague, Minister of Transport and Mining, Jamaica, and host of the High Level Minister Symposium and Hon. Pearnel Charles Jr, Minister of State, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Jamaica.

Following the symposium (27 February), senior maritime administrators in the region met for a Regional Workshop, in Montego Bay Jamaica, from 28 February to 1 March, facilitated by IMO and chaired by Jamaica. The workshop covered the latest regulatory and other developments in the international maritime sector in the Caribbean Region. The workshop was designed to provide Caribbean maritime administrators with the latest information on current and future developments at IMO and to facilitate the exchange of information between Caribbean administrations. The workshop also identified the development of a list of technical assistance priorities for the region for the 2020-2021 biennium.

*Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Cayman Islands, Curacao, the Commonwealth of Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sint Maarten, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago.

 

Uptake of alternative fuels in the spotlight

01/03/2019 

The barriers and incentives relating to the uptake of alternative fuels in the shipping industry were in the spotlight at a roundtable meeting of IMO’s Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA) at IMO Headquarters, London (28 February).

Experts from across the maritime industry were brought together to discuss successful incentives in other transport sectors and how they might be applied to shipping and ports.
 
The group discussed economic, technological and institutional barriers that are hindering greater market penetration of cleaner fuels. These include capital and operating costs, uncertainty over life-cycle emissions, lack of operational experience in the use of new fuels, onboard fuel storage, availability of fueling infrastructure as well as legal or regulatory barriers.
 
Possible incentive schemes for the maritime sector, as well as potential challenges in their application, were considered at the roundtable. Examples of such schemes were given, including an incentivization scheme in the United Kingdom to promote the uptake of renewables as well as lessons learned from the Norwegian NOx Fund.
 
Participants deliberated how ship owners could be incentivized to use alternative fuels, as well as incentives for alternative fuel supply and infrastructure development. The group collated lessons learned and key principles that could be considered for any future incentive schemes for the maritime sector.
 
The work undertaken at the roundtable specifically contributes to one of the short-term measures defined in IMO’s Initial GHG Strategy, on “incentives for first movers to develop and take up new technologies”. The Strategy recognizes that technological innovation and the global introduction of alternative fuels and/or energy sources for international shipping will be integral to achieving zero-carbon shipping.

 

Green technology for reducing GHG emissions from ships

27/02/2019 

How can green technology and innovation help deliver IMO’s initial strategy on reducing GHG emissions from ships? This was one of the questions being addressed this week at the Greentech in Shipping Global Forum in Hamburg, Germany (26-27 February).

Speaking at the conference, IMO’s Camille Bourgeon addressed maritime sector experts in green technology and innovation, saying that their work will be important in delivering IMO’s Initial GHG Strategy and achieving the goal to make shipping carbon free.
The Strategy, adopted by IMO Member States last year, makes a firm commitment to a complete phase out of GHG emissions from ships, a specific linkage to the Paris Agreement and a series of clear levels of ambition, including at least a 50% cut in emissions from the sector by 2050.

Mr. Bourgeon said that “these are ambitious targets, and technology will play a key role towards low- and zero-carbon shipping in the future, including in technological innovation in alternative fuels and energy sources”.

He said that it is encouraging to see so many people working in companies, classification societies and research groups exploring new solutions, and that the forum gives opportunity for industry stakeholders to further discuss such solutions – from alternative fuels, to engine technology, post-combustion devices, energy-saving technologies and more.

Find out more about IMO’s work on low carbon shipping and air pollution control, here.

 

United Arab Emirates accedes to air pollution and energy efficiency rules

20/02/2019 

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has become the latest State to accede to the IMO instrument providing rules for the prevention of air pollution from ships and energy efficiency requirements. This brings the total number of ratifications of MARPOL Annex VI to 93, representing 96.6% of world merchant shipping tonnage.

MARPOL Annex VI limits the main air pollutants contained in ships exhaust gas, including sulphur oxides and nitrous oxides, and prohibits deliberate emissions of ozone depleting substances. It also includes energy-efficiency measures aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from ships.

Ms. Rawdha Al Otaiba, Deputy Head of Mission of the UAE to the United Kingdom, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (20 February) to deposit instrument of accession.

 

The Netherlands ratifies ship recycling convention

20/02/2019 

IMO's treaty for safe and environmentally-sound ship recycling has received another boost. The Netherlands has become the eighth country to become a Party to the Hong Kong Convention.

The Convention covers the design, construction, operation and maintenance of ships, and preparation for ship recycling in order to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships.

Under the treaty, ships to be sent for recycling are required to carry an inventory of hazardous materials, specific to each ship. Ship recycling yards are required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", specifying the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory.

Mr. Dick Brus, Directorate for Maritime Affairs of the Netherlands, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (20 February) to deposit the instrument of acceptance.

 

IMO treaties ratified by Guyana

20/02/2019 

Guyana has signed up to a host of IMO treaties supporting safe, secure and clean international shipping. The treaties cover a wide variety of topics including marine pollution, dumping waste at sea and responding to pollution incidents involving hazardous and noxious substances. Guyana ratified two key IMO measures designed to preserve bio-diversity – the Ballast Water Management Convention and another on use of harmful anti-fouling systems on ships hulls – as well as others covering unlawful acts against the safety of navigation and removing wrecks from the seabed. It also signed four instruments covering liability and compensation.

In all, Guyana ratified eleven IMO instruments. H.E. Mr. Frederick Hamley Case, High Commissioner of Guyana, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (20 February) to deposit the instruments of accession.

 

​IMO Secretary-General urges all aboard for GHG reduction

19/02/2019 

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim has called for Member States and the entire maritime sector including shipping and ports, to come on board to achieve the ambitions set out in the historic IMO initial strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping, adopted last year. The strategy makes a firm commitment to a complete phase out of GHG emissions from ships, a specific linkage to the Paris Agreement and a series of clear levels of ambition, including at least a 50 per cent cut in emissions from the sector by 2050.

“We need to focus on technology transfer and research and development; we need expertise; we need IMO’s Member States to come together as one; we need the Member States to bring forward concrete proposals to IMO. We need to involve all maritime sectors – not just shipping. Investment in port infrastructure is just as important,” Secretary-General Lim said. He was speaking at the High Level Conference on Climate Change and Oceans Preservation, in Brussels, Belgium (19 February). The strategy includes a series of candidate measures that might be applied to achieve these targets in the short, medium and long terms. The detailed work of agreeing which of these will actually be adopted to enable these ambitions to be achieved is now under way. 

Mr. Lim said that the initial steps - the candidate short-term measures - are likely to include strengthening the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) and the Shipboard Energy Efficiency Management Plans (SEEMP) for ships, as well as gathering information under the fuel-oil data collection scheme. 

In the mid-term (before 2030), he highlighted the need to make zero-carbon ships more attractive and to direct investments towards innovative sustainable technologies and alternative fuels. In this context, the reduced sulphur limit for ships’ fuel oil, which enters into force on 1 January 2020, “should be seen as not only a landmark development for the environment and human health but also as a proxy "carbon price" – increasing the attractiveness of lower-carbon fuels or other means of propulsion for ships”. 

The Conference was opened by Mr. Charles Michel, Prime Minister of Belgium, and H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco.

On the sidelines of the Conference, Secretary-General Lim met H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco. Monaco hosts the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO). IMO and IHO collaborate on a number of areas, particularly when it comes to the provision of hydrographic charts for ships. 

Mr. Lim also met, separately, Mrs. Emma Navarro, Vice-President of the European Investment Bank, and Mrs. Magda Kopczynska, Director for Innovative and Sustainable Mobility in the Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport within the European Commission.

 

Preparing for the sulphur 2020 limit

18/02/2019 

IMO’s Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR) meets this week (18-22 February) at IMO headquarters. The meeting will focus on finalizing draft Guidelines on consistent implementation of the 0.50% sulphur limit under MARPOL Annex VI. The aim of the Guidelines is to assist in the preparations for and uniform implementation of the lower limit for sulphur content in ships’ fuel oil, which will take effect on 1 January 2020 and will have a significant beneficial impact on human health and the environment. The meeting will also consider draft amendments to MARPOL Annex VI (related to fuel oil samples and testing and verification of fuel oil sulphur content) and draft amendments to associated port State control and onboard sampling guidelines. IMO has already issued ship implementation planning guidance, to help shipowners prepare for the new limit.
 
Among other agenda items, the Sub-Committee will begin its work to develop measures to reduce the risks of use and carriage of heavy fuel oil as fuel by ships in Arctic waters. In addition, work on identifying appropriate control measures to reduce the impact on the Arctic of Black Carbon emissions from international shipping will also continue. 
 
The Sub-Committee will address the IMO Convention for the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships (AFS Convention), which prohibits the use of biocides using organotin compounds. A comprehensive proposal to amend annex 1 to the AFS Convention to include controls on the biocide cybutryne will be considered. 
 
The meeting will also consider revisions to guidelines for the provisional assessment of liquid substances transported in bulk; and is expected to finalize the draft guide on practical implementation of the pollution prevention and response treaties (OPRC Convention and the OPRC-HNS Protocol).
 
The Sub-Committee will also continue its review of the 2015 Guidelines on Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems.
 
The meeting was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Mr Sveinung Oftedal (Norway). Click for photos.

 

Experience-building for ballast water management

15/02/2019 

Experience with implementing the IMO Ballast Water Management Convention, which aims to prevent the spread of potentially invasive aquatic species, is now underway. IMO’s participation at the Global TestNet 10th annual meeting (14-15 February) provided an opportunity to highlight a new module on IMO’s Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS), which allows port States, flag States and other stakeholders to gather, prepare and submit data on ballast water sampling and chemical and biological analysis. Analysis of such data will allow a systematic and evidence-based review of the requirements of the BWM Convention and potentially the development of a package of amendments to the Convention.  Ballast Water Management Convention requires ships to manage their ballast water and sediments to a defined standard.

IMO participation at the meeting covered all the latest regulatory developments related to anti-fouling systems and biofouling. IMO is considering a proposal to amend the IMO Convention for the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships (AFS Convention) to include new controls on the biocide cybutryne. Currently, the AFS Convention prohibits the use of biocides using organotin compounds.

IMO is also reviewing IMO biofouling Guidelines, which provide a globally-consistent approach on how biofouling should be controlled and managed to minimize the transfer of invasive aquatic species through ships’ hulls. A new global GloFouling project has been launched, to drive actions to implement the guidelines. The project will also spur the development of best practices and standards for improved biofouling management in other ocean industries.

The Global TestNet is a forum of organizations involved in standardization, transparency and openness of land-based and/or shipboard testing for the certification of ballast water management systems

 

Ports for greener shipping

15/02/2019 

Ports are key players in the maritime transport system when it comes to achieving ambitious emissions reduction. IMO’s initial greenhouse gas strategy recognizes that shipping and ports are intrinsically linked. The role of ports in achieving emissions reductions was highlighted at the Future Port congress, Bilbao, Spain (12-14 February). IMO participation at a roundtable on green ports highlighted the potential for provision of ship and shore-side/on-shore power supply from renewable sources, infrastructure to support supply of alternative low-carbon and zero-carbon fuels, and activities to further optimize the logistics chain and its planning, including ports.

In particular, the event discussed onshore power supply and the steps to take when initiating onshore power supply projects, including ensuring equipment is compatible across the world and safe to use. IMO‘s Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment is developing draft guidelines on safe operation of on-shore power supply service in port for ships engaged on international voyages, and considering the need for mandatory provisions.

IMO also highlighted the work of the Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA) in tackling contractual and operational barriers to implementing “Just-In-Time” (JIT) operations, which could cut the time ships spend idling outside ports and help cut emissions.

 

Training to enhance maritime security in Kenya

15/02/2019 

Maritime law enforcement officials* from Kenya are taking part in a two week training course on best practices for visit, board, search and seizure of vessels, in Mombasa, Kenya (11-22 February). The multi-agency course brings together 30 officials to learn skills for effective coordination in combating maritime crimes and procedures used to successfully board and search a vessel of interest.

The training is part of IMO’s support for implementing the Jeddah Amendment to Djibouti Code of Conduct 2017, a regional agreement against maritime crime in the Gulf of Aden and western Indian Ocean area, which IMO helped to establish. Implementation of the code of conduct is supported by a range of international partners including United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Police Organization (INTERPOL), Mohammed Bin Naif Academy for Maritime Science and Security Studies (Saudi Arabia), United States Coast Guard, US Naval Forces Africa, Canadian Coast Guard, British Peace Support Team (Africa), NATO Maritime Interdiction Training Centre (NMIOTC) and others.

The ongoing course is supported by a joint Royal Navy/Royal Marine training team of seven experts from the United Kingdom and four experts from the International Committee of the Red Cross – to teach skills on International Humanitarian Rights Law, use of force, arrest and detention, search and seizure, and judicial guarantees.

* from the Kenya Maritime Authority, Kenya Coast Guard Services, Kenya Ports Authority, Kenya Maritime Police Unit, Kenya Navy, Kenya Fisheries Service, Immigration, Port Health, and Kenya Revenue Authority

 

Costa Rica ratifies treaty for enhancing free flow of maritime trade

12/02/2019 

​Costa Rica is the latest country to ratify the Convention on Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic (FAL Convention). The IMO treaty enhances communication between ships and ports to help shipments move more quickly, more easily and more efficiently. H.E. Mr. Rafael Ortiz Fábrega, Ambassador of Costa Rica, met IMO Secretary-General at IMO Headquarters, London (12 February) to deposit the instrument of accession. Find out more about the FAL Convention, including why it is needed, advice for governments, and information on the 8 April 2019 electronic data exchange deadline, here.

 

Promoting international counter-terrorism treaties in South and South-East Asia

08/02/2019 

IMO maritime security and counter-terrorism treaties* are key international instruments supporting countries to counter terrorism. To boost implementation of these treaties in South and South-East Asia, IMO and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) are running a cross-regional workshop in Bali, Indonesia (5-8-February).

The workshop is addressing the need to ratify the relevant international counter-terrorism instruments and to incorporate their provisions into national laws as well as promoting multi-agency and regional collaboration.

The event builds on recent national workshops held in Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Philippines and Viet Nam, as well as a sub-regional event held at IMO Headquarters in November 2018.

Participants** are sharing experiences and best practices, and are exploring the potential for regional and cross-regional collaboration on maritime counter-terrorism prevention and response.

This is the last activity under Phase One of the “partnership without paperwork” project initiated by UNODC with funding from the Government of Japan. IMO is presenting on subjects including “the International Legal Framework against Maritime Terrorism”; “Suspected transport of BCN weapons by vessel in transit and passing through territorial waters” and “Bio-Terrorism/Mass Casualty event involving a Cruise Liner alongside in port”. 

* Including SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the suppression of unlawful acts (SUA) instruments

** Participants from Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Maldives, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Viet Nam.

 

IMO collaborates to boost African maritime development

06/02/2019 

As part of its continuing efforts to help African countries improve the sustainability of their maritime sectors and their blue economies, IMO frequently works with partners to help support their initiatives.

This work includes participating in two major annual maritime security exercises in Africa, the first of which, Cutlass Express, is currently underway in Djibouti, Mozambique and the Seychelles (25 January 7 February). Cutlass Express puts special emphasis on encouraging navies and civilian agencies and different countries to work together, as envisaged in existing frameworks such as the Djibouti Code of Conduct (DCoC) and the Jeddah Amendment to the DCoC – a regional agreement against maritime crime in the Gulf of Aden and western Indian Ocean area, which IMO helped to establish.

IMO is also taking part in a Senior Leaders Seminar, organized by the Africa Center for Strategic Studies in the margins of Cutlass Express, in Maputo, Mozambique, in which heads of navies from the region are participating. IMO emphasized the need for multi-agency, multi-disciplinary and whole of government approaches to maritime development within the context of the Codes of Conduct and how maritime security can underpin economic development and generate wider stability.

 

Safe mooring rule set to be finalized

04/02/2019 

IMO work to preventing accidents when ships are being moored at their berth in a port continues this week. A draft SOLAS regulation aimed at better protecting seafarers and shore-based mooring personnel from injuries during mooring operations is set to be finalized by the Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction (SDC 6). The meeting (4-8 February) also aims to complete draft guidelines on the design of mooring arrangements; and on their inspection and maintenance; as well as to revise existing guidelines on shipboard towing and mooring arrangements.

Safety measures for non-SOLAS ships operating in Polar waters, not currently covered by the Polar Code, are also on the agenda. The Sub-Committee will consider the first draft set of recommendations for safety measures for fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over, as well as pleasure yachts above 300 gross tonnage not engaged in trade, operating in polar waters.

Another important agenda item is the ongoing development of a draft new SOLAS chapter XV on Safety measures for ships carrying industrial personnel and the associated draft Code, aimed at providing minimum safety standards for ships that carry industrial personnel, as well as for the personnel, so as to ensure their safe transit prior or after their deployment in relation to the construction, maintenance, decommissioning, operation or servicing of offshore facilities. The Sub-Committee will also continue its work on developing second generation intact stability criteria, including preparing guidelines on the specification of direct stability assessment; the preparation and approval of operational limitations and operational guidance; and  vulnerability criteria.

The SDC Sub-Committee was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim, and is being chaired by Kevin Hunter (United Kingdom). Click for photos.

 

Tackling barriers to Just-In-Time ship operation

01/02/2019 

Implementing “Just-In-Time” (JIT) operations to cut the time ships spend idling outside ports can help cut emissions. This is good for the environment and can cut costs too. But there are a number of contractual and operational barriers to overcome before this could be implemented worldwide.

For some types of ships, such as bulk carriers and tankers, clauses in charterparty contracts currently act as a barrier to the uptake of JIT. For other ship types, such as container ships, contractual barriers do not exist, allowing the ship’s master to reduce speed without breach of contract, thereby enabling JIT to start being implemented today.

Focusing on those ship types that can already contractually implement JIT, IMO’s Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA) brought together a wide range of industry stakeholders to discuss how to operationally make JIT a global reality. Convening at IMO Headquarters in London (31 January), representatives from shipping companies, port authorities, terminal operators, service providers (including ship agents, bunker providers and tug operators) and other maritime organizations, discussed in detail how to tackle existing operational barriers.

The roundtable identified that for ports be able to provide incoming ships with a reliable berth arrival time, firstly a reliable departure time of the ship at berth needs to be achieved - which involves collaboration of many stakeholders. The ship currently at berth will only depart after loading, unloading, bunkering, provisioning and other critical services have all been completed. However, the terminal and other service providers currently share very few updates about completion times.

The roundtable also identified the need for global standardisation and harmonization of data, which is currently being discussed under IMO’s Facilitation Committee, to provide ships with regular updates about the availability of berths, especially in the last twelve hours prior to port arrival. Timing the arrival can allow ships to optimise their speed – such as by slowing down - providing further reduction in the carbon footprint of shipping as well as saving on fuel costs. Additionally, it improves the safety of navigation and rest hour planning of ship crew and nautical services.

GIA members plan to hold another meeting later this year to discuss contractual barriers to JIT. The alliance is also in the process of preparing a real-time JIT pilot trial, in order to test the tangible solutions identified so far and gather experience. The GIA will submit a progress report on its work on JIT to IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) with a view to continue supporting IMO member States in tackling emissions from ships and reaching the ambitious emissions targets set out in IMO’s Initial GHG Strategy.

The GIA is a public-private partnership initiative of the IMO under the framework of the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloMEEP Project that aims to bring together maritime industry leaders to support an energy efficient and low carbon maritime transport system. The GIA currently has 15 members, representing leading shipowners and operators, classification societies, engine and technology builders and suppliers, big data providers, oil companies and ports.

A GIA video explaining the Just-In-Time concept can be viewed here.

 

Turkey ratifies ship recycling convention

31/01/2019 

Turkey, one of the five major ship recycling countries in the world, has ratified the IMO Hong Kong Convention, the treaty for safe and environmentally sound ship recycling. 

The Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009, covers the design, construction, operation and maintenance of ships, and preparation for ship recycling in order to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships.

Under the Hong Kong Convention, ships to be sent for recycling are required to carry an inventory of hazardous materials, specific to each ship. Ship recycling yards are required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", specifying the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory.

In its ratification instrument, Turkey declares that it requires explicit approval of the Ship Recycling Plan before a ship may be recycled in its authorized Ship Recycling Facility(ies).

H.E. Mr. Ümit Yalçın, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Turkey to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim to deposit the instrument of ratification to the treaty today (31 January).

Turkey becomes the seventh State to become a Party to the Hong Kong Convention. The treaty will enter into force 24 months after ratification by 15 States, representing 40 per cent of world merchant shipping by gross tonnage, and a combined maximum annual ship recycling volume not less than 3 per cent of their combined tonnage.

The seven contracting States represent more than 20% of world merchant shipping tonnage and the combined annual ship recycling volume of the Contracting States during the preceding 10 years is 1,652,961 GT, i.e. 0.62% of the merchant shipping tonnage of the same States (Belgium, Congo, Denmark, France, Norway, Panama and Turkey).  

The top five ship recycling countries in the world, accounting between them for more than 90% of all ship recycling by tonnage, are Bangladesh, China, India, Pakistan and Turkey.

IMO is implementing a project (SENSREC Phase II) in Bangladesh to enhance safe and environmentally sound ship recycling develop a roadmap towards accession to the Hong Kong convention and focus on building capacity within Bangladesh to develop a legal, policy and institutional reform roadmap towards accession to the Hong Kong Convention and  training a variety of stakeholders

 

Promoting trade facilitation in Djibouti

25/01/2019 

New requirements for electronic exchange of data for the clearance of ships become effective from 9 April 2019. To help prepare for this, a National Seminar on Facilitation of Maritime Traffic was held in Djibouti (22-24 January). The workshop raised awareness of the new requirements for participants from ministries with responsibilities in the clearance of ships, cargo, crew and passengers at ports of Djibouti, and private stakeholders. The event addressed the benefits of using a maritime single window and electronic data exchange; and also addressed other facilitation issues, including stowaways and persons rescued at sea. The seminar was organized by IMO and the Direction des Affaires Maritimes of Djibouti.

 

The Russian Federation accedes to passenger compensation treaty

18/01/2019 

​The Russian Federation has acceded to the IMO treaty dealing with compulsory insurance covering passengers on ships. The 2002 Athens Convention relating to the Carriage of Passengers and their Luggage by Sea sets the limits of liability for incidents on a ship involving passengers, including death of or personal injury to a passenger and loss of or damage to luggage and vehicles. Mr. Yury Melenas, Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to IMO, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim to deposit the instrument of accession (16 January).

 

Crossing language barriers

18/01/2019 

​One of the great strengths of the UN system is its multi-national and multi-cultural nature. As far as possible, UN bodies try to work in their delegates’ own languages or at least in a language they are familiar and comfortable with. There are six official languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish) and the vast majority of international meetings throughout the UN system enjoy simultaneous interpretation into all of them.

That means interpreters are often the unsung heroes of international diplomacy. Last week (12-13 January) IMO hosted a meeting of the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC). The UN system works closely with AIIC and 2019 marks 50 years since the first agreement between the UN and AIIC setting out terms and conditions of employment for freelance conference interpreters. The meeting gave interpreters the chance to trial IMO’s own interpreting booths and meeting facilities, as well as evaluating new platforms for remote interpreting during simulated real-time interpreting exercises.

 

Polar communication and navigation equipment guidance to be finalized

16/01/2019 

IMO’s Polar Code helps ensure that ships operating in the harsh Arctic and Antarctic areas take into account extremes of temperature and make sure critical equipment remains operational. Draft guidance for navigation and communication equipment intended for use on ships operating in polar waters is expected to be finalized by the current session of the Sub-Committee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR 6, 16-25 January). The guidance will include recommendations on temperature and mechanical shock testing, and on how to address ice accretion and battery performance in cold temperatures.

The Sub-Committee will also consider the report of the 14th meeting of the Joint IMO/ITU Experts Group on maritime radiocommunication matters. The meeting will finalize the draft IMO position on maritime radiocommunication matters for submission to the World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19), to be held in November. The availability of interference-free parts of radio spectrum, dedicated for maritime radiocommunication and radionavigation purposes, is essential to ensure the safety and security of shipping.

The Sub-Committee will continue its work on a number of key agenda items, including the ongoing work to modernize the Global Maritime Distress and Safety system (GMDSS). The mandatory GMDSS was adopted in 1988 to ensure full integration of maritime radio and satellite communications so that distress alerts can be generated from anywhere on the world’s oceans. The modernization plan aims to update the provisions, including allowing for the incorporation of new satellite communication services.

On e-navigation matters, the meeting will focus on harmonization and standardization which is key for the effective implementation of the e-navigation strategy. The Sub-Committee will further develop the description of various maritime services coordinated by different organizations with the view to enhance harmonization; and draft guidelines on standardized modes of operation, or S-mode, which will improve standardization of the user interface and information used by seafarers.

On search and rescue matters, the Sub-Committee will consider recommendations from the latest regular International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)/IMO Joint Working Group. IMO works closely with ICAO on the harmonization of aeronautical and maritime search and rescue. The meeting is expected to validate a revised model course on SAR Mission Coordinator. 

Amongst other regular agenda items, the Sub-Committee will review proposed new and amended ships' routeing measures, consider updates to Maritime Safety Information (MSI) related provisions and will discuss matters relating to the functioning and operation of the Long-Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT).

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim opened the session, which is being chaired by Mr. Ringo Lakeman (Netherlands). (Click for photos).

 

Seafarers, technology and automation - managing future challenges

16/01/2019 

​IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim has highlighted the need to consider seafarer training and standards as shipping evolves, with increasing levels of technology and automation. Speaking at IMO Headquarters (15 January) at the launch of a new report “Transport 2040: Automation, Technology and Employment - the Future of Work”, Secretary-General Lim set out key questions that will require focus from all stakeholders:  “How will the seafarer of the future manage the challenges related to an increasing level of technology and automation in maritime transport? How will the new technologies impact on the nature of jobs in the industry? What standards will seafarers be required to meet with respect to education, training and certification to qualify them for the jobs of the future?”

An important strategic direction for IMO is the integration of new and advancing technologies into the regulatory framework - balancing the benefits  derived from new and advancing technologies against safety and security concerns, the impact on the environment and on international trade facilitation, the potential costs to the industry and  their impact on personnel, both on board and ashore. “Member States and the industry need to anticipate the impact these changes may have and how they will be addressed,” Mr. Lim said.

The International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and the World Maritime University (WMU) Transport 2040 report is the first-ever, independent and comprehensive assessment of how automation will affect the future of work in the transport industry, focusing on technological changes and automation in road, air, rail and maritime transport. The report concludes that the introduction of automation in global transport will be “evolutionary, rather than revolutionary,” and that “despite high levels of automation, qualified human resources with the right skill sets will still be needed in the foreseeable future”. Technological advances are inevitable, but will be gradual and vary by region. Workers will be affected in different ways based on their skill levels and the varying degrees of preparedness of different countries. Read more and download the report here.

Mr. Lim welcomed the report, noting that it would contribute to the efforts of the global shipping community to help implement the UN Sustainable Development Goals, including the goals on quality education; gender equality; decent work and economic growth; and industry, innovation and infrastructure.

 

Qatar accedes to load lines convention

15/01/2019 

​Qatar is the 111th State to accede to the International Convention on Load Lines (1988 Protocol) – an important IMO ship safety treaty. Limitations on the draught to which a ship may be loaded make a significant contribution to the ship's safety. These limits are given in the form of freeboards, which, together with external weathertight and watertight integrity, is the main objective of the Convention. Measures under the treaty take into account the potential hazards present in different zones and different seasons.

The 1988 Protocol updates and revises the earlier treaty. The technical annex contains several additional safety measures concerning doors, freeing ports, hatchways and other items. These measures help to ensure the watertight integrity of ships' hulls below the freeboard deck. All assigned load lines must be marked amidships on each side of the ship, together with the deck line.

Mr. Mohamed Abdulla Al-Jabir, Deputy Ambassador, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters in London (15 January) to deposit the instrument of accession. The Protocol's signatories now represent more than 97% of world merchant shipping tonnage.

 

IMO helps Member States with sustainability targets

11/01/2019 

In 2015, 193 countries adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 associated Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)It calls for action by all countries to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development by 2030, world-wide.

 
To help its Member States gain a better understanding of the SDGs and the role IMO can play in achieving them, IMO and the United Nations System Staff College held a workshop (11 January) for Member State delegations at IMO’s London headquarters. Among the topics covered in the workshop were how to integrate different stakeholders and develop coherent policies with regard to sustainable development, and how to generate engagement and buy-in among potential partners.
 
As part of the United Nations family, IMO is actively committed to helping its Member States achieve the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs. Indeed, most of the elements of the 2030 Agenda will only be realized with a sustainable shipping sector supporting world trade and facilitating global economy. The 2030 Agenda and the SDGs are widely seen as an opportunity to transform the world for the better, leaving no one behind.
 
Find out more about IMO and the SDGs, here.

 

Training on maritime counter-terrorism measures in Viet Nam

11/01/2019 

IMO is assisting the Government of Viet Nam to implement international counter-terrorism measures involving the maritime sector.

The training workshop is part of an on-going project with the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, which assists States’ capability to implement and enforce maritime safety and security legislation* to support countering terrorism, piracy and armed robbery against ships.

The exercise is taking place in Hai Phong, Viet Nam (9-10 January). The programme emphasises and demonstrates the need for cooperation among government departments and agencies. Participants are taking part in a range of evolving scenarios, to determine respective roles, responsibilities, processes and procedures, and how these may develop, both during an incident and during routine business.
 
The results will help determine possible gaps in policies and plans, and help IMO and other agencies to provide improved assistance in the future. 
 
* Relevant treaties include IMO’s maritime security instruments in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS); the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS) Code; the Convention on the Suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation (SUA); and the security-related aspects of the Convention on Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic (FAL).

 

Costa Rica accedes to maritime search and rescue treaty

08/01/2019 

International search and rescue plans are crucial, so that, no matter where an accident occurs, the rescue of persons in distress at sea can be coordinated successfully. The worldwide ratification and implementation of IMO's International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR Convention) is a key component in efforts to ensure the safety of international shipping.

 Costa Rica is the 112th State to accede to the treaty, whose signatories now represent more than 80% of world merchant shipping tonnage. H.E. Mr. Rafael Ortiz Fábrega, Ambassador of Costa Rica to the United Kingdom, met IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at IMO Headquarters, London (7 January) to deposit the instrument of accession.