Passenger information required on all passenger ships from 1 January 1999

From 1 January 1999, details of passengers on board ships, including name and gender and whether adult child or infant, must be recorded for search and rescue purposes.

The regulation is contained in Chapter III of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, one of the conventions of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations agency responsible for the safety of shipping and the prevention of marine pollution.

The requirement to provide information on passengers was part of a package of amendments to SOLAS adopted in November 1995, based on proposals put forward by a Panel of Experts set up by IMO in December 1994 following the ro-ro ferry Estonia disaster of September 1994 in which more than 850 people were killed. The regulation on Information on passengers came into force on 1 July 1997, but the requirement to provide details of passengers takes effect from 1 January 1999.

Requirement for seafarers' training on passenger ships

Also on January 1, 1999, amendments to the revised International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) and Code, concerning training for personnel on passenger ships, enter into force.

The amendments were adopted in June 1997 and concern STCW Chapter V: Special training requirements for personnel on certain types of ships, which includes requirements for the training and qualifications of personnel on board ro-ro passenger ships, introduced after the sinking of the ferry Estonia in September 1994.

Crews on ro-ro passenger ships already have to receive training in technical aspects and also in crowd and crisis management and human behaviour, and the amendments basically clarify these requirements and extend them to crew on all passenger ships.

The amendments include an additional Regulation V/3 on Mandatory minimum requirements for the training and qualifications of masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on passenger ships other than ro-ro passenger ships. Related additions are also made to the STCW Code, covering Crowd management training; Familiarization training; Safety training for personnel providing direct service to passengers in passenger spaces; Passenger safety; and Crisis management and human behaviour training.

Emergency towing arrangements for tankers required by 1 January 1999

By 1 January 1999, all tankers (including oil tankers, chemical tankers and gas carriers) of not less than 20,000 tonnes deadweight must have an emergency towing arrangement fitted at both ends.

The requirement, in Chapter II-1 of SOLAS, came into force for new ships from 1 January 1996. Ships built before 1 January 1996 had to have the emergency towing arrangement fitted at the first scheduled dry docking after 1 January 1996 but not later than 1 January 1999.

The aim of the regulation is to ensure a tanker involved in an incident can be easily towed.



References:

International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974 , as amended
Chapter III - Life-saving appliances and arrangements
Regulation 27
Information on passengers

  1. All persons on board all passenger ships shall be counted prior to departure.
  2. Details of persons who have declared a need for special care or assistance in emergency situations shall be recorded and communicated to the master prior to departure.
  3. In addition, not later than 1 January 1999, the names and gender of all persons on board, distinguishing between adults, children and infants, shall be recorded for search and rescue purposes.
  4. The information required by paragraphs 1, 2 and 3 shall be kept ashore and made readily available to search and rescue services when needed.
  5. Administrations may exempt passenger ships from the requirements of paragraph 3, if the scheduled voyages of such ships render it impracticable for them to prepare such records.


International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, as amended

Chapter II-1 Construction - subdivision and stability, machinery and electrical installations
Part A-1 - Structure of ships
Regulation 3-4
Emergency towing arrangements on tankers

Emergency towing arrangements shall be fitted at both ends on board every tanker of not less than 20,000 tonnes deadweight, constructed on or after 1 January 1996. For tankers constructed before 1 January 1996, such an arrangement shall be fitted at the first scheduled dry-docking after 1 January 1996 but not later than 1 January 1999. The design and construction of the towing arrangements shall be approved by the Administration, based on the guidelines developed by the Organization.

(Note: This regulation was previously included in Chapter V of SOLAS before being moved to Chapter II-1 via amendments to SOLAS adopted in December 1996)


Amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended

Chapter V
Special training requirements for personnel on certain types of ships
Regulation V/2 - Mandatory minimum requirements for the training and qualifications of masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on ro-ro passenger ships

  1. The following text is added at the end of paragraph 3:

"or be required to provide evidence of having achieved the required standard of competence within the previous five years."

The following new regulation V/3 is added after existing regulation V/2:
"Regulation V/3

Mandatory minimum requirements for the training and qualifications of masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on passenger ships other than ro-ro passenger ships

  1. This regulation applies to masters, officers, ratings and other personnel serving on board passenger ships, other than ro-ro passenger ships, engaged on international voyages. Administrations shall determine the applicability of these requirements to personnel serving on passenger ships engaged on domestic voyages.
  2. Prior to being assigned shipboard duties on board passenger ships, seafarers shall have completed the training required by paragraphs 4 to 8 below in accordance with their capacity, duties and responsibilities.
  3. Seafarers who are required to be trained in accordance with paragraphs 4, 7 and 8 below shall, at intervals not exceeding five years, undertake appropriate refresher training or be required to provide evidence of having achieved the required standard of competence within the previousfive years.
  4. Personnel designated on muster lists to assist passengers in emergency situations on board passenger ships shall have completed training in crowd management as specified in section A-V/3, paragraph 1 of the STCW Code.
  5. Masters, officers and other personnel assigned specific duties and responsibilities on board passenger ships shall have completed the familiarization training specified in section A-V/3, paragraph 2 of the STCW Code.
  6. Personnel providing direct service to passengers on board passenger ships in passenger spaces shall have completed the safety training specified in section A-V/3, paragraph 3 of the STCW Code.
  7. Masters, chief mates, and every person assigned immediate responsibility for embarking and disembarking passengers shall have completed approved training in passenger safety as specified in section A-V/3, paragraph 4 of the STCW Code.
  8. Masters, chief mates, chief engineer officers, second engineer officers and any person having responsibility for the safety of passengers in emergency situations on board passenger ships shall have completed approved training in crisis management and human behaviour as specified in section A-V/3, paragraph 5 of the STCW Code.
  9. Administrations shall ensure that documentary evidence of the training which has been completed is issued to every person found qualified under the provisions of this regulation."

    (Related amendments are also made to the Seafarers' Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) Code)