Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), 82nd session: 29 Nov - 8 Dec 2006


Opening address of the Secretary-General


A raft of new international standards for passenger ship safety were adopted when IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) met in Istanbul, Turkey, for its 82nd session from 29 November to 8 December 2006.

Other important issues on the MSC agenda included the further development of goal-based standards and discussion of security and facilitation issues related to the carriage of containers by ships.

The MSC Vice-Chairman, Mr. Neil Ferrer of the Philippines, chaired the session, following the untimely death of Mr. Igor Ponomarev, Chairman of the MSC and Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to IMO.

Revised passenger ship safety standards
Fire regulations on balconies
Prevention of accidents involving lifeboats
Protective coatings
Other amendments
IMSO appointed to oversee new satellite providers
Goal-based new ship construction standards
Measures to enhance maritime security
Long Range Identification and Tracking - technical specifications and guidelines
Explosions on chemical and product carriers
Impact of ISM Code
Near misses
Implementation of the revised STCW Convention
Other issues
Resolutions adopted
List of circulars and circular letters approved by MSC 82

Revised passenger ship safety standards
The package of amendments to SOLAS adopted at the session were the result of a comprehensive review of passenger ship safety initiated in 2000 with the aim of assessing whether the current regulations were adequate, in particular for the large passenger ships now being built.

The work in developing the new and amended regulations has based its guiding philosophy on the dual premise that the regulatory framework should place more emphasis on the prevention of a casualty from occurring in the first place and that future passenger ships should be designed for improved survivability so that, in the event of a casualty, persons can stay safely on board as the ship proceeds to port.

The amendments include new concepts such as the incorporation of criteria for the casualty threshold (the amount of damage a ship is able to withstand, according to the design basis, and still safely return to port) into SOLAS chapters II-1 and II-2. The amendments also provide regulatory flexibility so that ship designers can meet any safety challenges the future may bring. The amendments include:

  · alternative designs and arrangements;
  · safe areas and the essential systems to be maintained while a ship proceeds to port after a casualty, which will require redundancy of propulsion and other essential systems;
  · on-board safety centres, from where safety systems can be controlled, operated and monitored;
  · fixed fire detection and alarm systems, including requirements for fire detectors and manually operated call points to be capable of being remotely and individually identified;
  · fire prevention, including amendments aimed at enhancing the fire safety of atriums, the means of escape in case of fire and ventilation systems; and
  · time for orderly evacuation and abandonment, including requirements for the essential systems that must remain operational in case any one main vertical zone is unserviceable due to fire.

The amendments are expected to enter into force on 1 July 2010.

Fire regulations on balconies
The MSC adopted amendments to SOLAS chapter II-2 and to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code) to strengthen the fire protection arrangements in relation to cabin balconies on passenger vessels. The amendments were developed in response to the fire aboard the cruise ship Star Princess, while on passage between Grand Cayman and Montego Bay, Jamaica, in March of this year. The fire began on an external balcony and spread over several decks.

The amendments to SOLAS chapter II-2 are aimed at ensuring that existing regulations 4.4 (Primary deck coverings), 5.3.1.2 (Ceilings and linings), 5.3.2 (Use of combustible materials) and 6 (Smoke generation potential and toxicity) are also applied to cabin balconies on new passenger ships.

For existing passenger ships, relevant provisions require that furniture on cabin balconies be of restricted fire risk unless fixed water spraying systems, fixed fire detection and fire alarm systems are fitted and that partitions separating balconies be constructed of non combustible materials, similar to the provisions for new passenger ships.

The amendments are expected to enter into force on 1 July 2008.

Prevention of accidents involving lifeboats
The MSC adopted an amendment to SOLAS regulation III/19.3.3.4 concerning provisions for the launch of free-fall lifeboats during abandon-ship drills. The amendment will allow, during the abandon-ship drill, for the lifeboat to either be free-fall launched with only the required operating crew on board, or lowered into the water by means of the secondary means of launching without the operating crew on board, and then manoeuvred in the water by the operating crew. The aim is to prevent accidents with lifeboats occurring during abandon-ship drills. The amendment is expected to enter into force on 1 July 2008.

Protective coatings
The MSC adopted the Performance standard for protective coatings of dedicated seawater ballast tanks on all new ships and of double-side skin spaces of bulk carriers, which will be made mandatory by way of amendments to SOLAS regulations II-1/3-2, also adopted at the session.

The SOLAS amendments are expected to enter into force on 1 July 2008 and the performance standard will apply to ships for which the building contract is placed on or after 1 July 2008; or, in the absence of a building contract, the keels of which are laid on or after 1 January 2009, or the delivery of which is on or after 1 July 2012.

Other amendments
The MSC also adopted a number of other amendments:

  · amendments to the FSS Code relating to fire extinguishers, specifically portable foam applicators; fixed foam fire-extinguishing systems; fixed-pressure water-spraying and water-mist fire-extinguishing systems, fixed fire detection and fire alarm systems for cabin balconies. Entry into force on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the International Life-Saving Appliance Code (LSA Code), including those related to life rafts, life boats and rescue boats, particularly in relation to stowage and release mechanisms. Entry into force on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code), relating to fire protection and fire extinction, and the revised chapters 17 (Summary of minimum requirements), 18 (List of products to which the code does not apply) and 19 (Index of Products Carried in Bulk). Entry into force on 1 January 2009.
  · amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code), to update the references to SOLAS regulations and to add two more chemicals to the list of products in chapter 19 (Summary of minimum requirements). Entry into force on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the International Codes of Safety for High-Speed Craft (1994 HSC Code and the 2000 HSC Code), to update them in line with relevant SOLAS amendments and, in the case of the 2000 HSC Code, to revise requirements relating to testing and calculations for buoyancy, stability and subdivision. Entry into force on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the Protocol of 1988, relating to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, to include in the Record of equipment for the relevant safety certificate an entry regarding the long-range identification and tracking system. Entry into force on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the Protocol of 1988 relating to the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966, including amendments of a reference in regulation 22 (Scuppers, inlets and discharges) and an amendment in regulation 39 (Minimum bow height and reserve buoyancy). Entry into force on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the Dynamically Supported Craft (DSC) Code to update it in line with relevant amendments to SOLAS. Will become effective on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the Gas Carrier (GC) Code, to update it in line with certain fire safety requirements in SOLAS. Will become effective on 1 July 2008.
  · amendments to the Revised recommendation on testing of life-saving appliances (resolution MSC.81(70)), including revisions to prototype tests for lifebuoys, lifejackets, immersion suits, anti-exposure suits and thermal protective aids, liferafts, lifeboats, rescue boats and fast rescue boats, launching and embarkation appliances, position-indicating lights for life-saving appliances and hydrostatic release units; and revisions to production and installation tests for survival craft, launching and stowage arrangements. The amendments will become effective on 1 July 2008.

IMSO appointed to oversee new satellite providers
The Committee agreed that the International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO) was the appropriate Organization to undertake the oversight of future satellite service providers in the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) and invited IMSO to undertake that role forthwith.

In essence, the MSC would determine the criteria, procedures and arrangements for evaluating and recognizing satellite services for participation in the GMDSS, while services recognized by the Committee would be subject to oversight by IMSO.

The MSC instructed the Sub-Committee on Radiocommunications, Search and Rescue (COMSAR 11) to redraft resolution A.888(21) Criteria for the provision of mobile-satellite communication systems in the GMDSS, to reflect the decisions and to submit it to MSC 83 with a view to adoption by the 25th IMO Assembly. COMSAR 11 was also invited to finalize any corresponding amendments to SOLAS chapter IV.

Goal-based new ship construction standards
The MSC re-established the Working Group on Goal-based Standards and further progressed the work on the issue.

The Committee has worked on the basis of a prescriptive approach for GBS for provisions for hull construction for bulk carriers and oil tankers and of a safety level approach for all other ship types.

With regard to the GBS for bulk carriers and oil tankers, the MSC has already agreed on a five-tier system, consisting of goals (Tier I), functional requirements (Tier II), verification of compliance criteria (Tier III), technical procedures and guidelines, classification rules and industry standards (Tier IV) and codes of practice and safety and quality systems for shipbuilding, ship operation, maintenance, training, manning, etc. (Tier V). Tier I goals and Tier II functional requirements have already been agreed in principle.

Following consideration of the matter, the MSC approved the Plan for the pilot project on trial application of the Tier III verification process using the IACS Common Structural Rules (CSR) and agreed that the nomination of candidates for the Pilot Panel should be open to all, while the selection of members by the MSC Chairman, in consultation with the Secretariat, would assure that the Panel would be balanced. The objective of the pilot project is to conduct a trial application of Tier III for oil tankers and bulk carriers with the intention of validating the Tier III verification framework, identifying shortcomings and making proposals for improvement.

The MSC agreed to include ergonomic principles as functional requirements in Tier II, and the Group prepared revised Tier II functional requirements.

The MSC noted that the Group agreed on a revised version of the Ship Construction File (SCF) and that the SCF, as a result of GBS, could become an independent mandatory requirement under SOLAS chapter II 1 and not part of the classification rules. However, most of the content in the file would emerge from the application of classification rules.

A correspondence group on GBS for oil tankers and bulk carriers was established, to monitor the pilot project and disseminate information on its progress and to develop draft SOLAS amendments for the incorporation of GBS for oil tankers and bulk carriers in SOLAS chapter II-1.

A Correspondence Group on the Safety Level Approach was established, to progress work to determine the current safety level in a holistic high-level manner, divided by ship types, in order to develop Tier I goals by: distinguishing ship types in a clear manner resulting in definitions of generic ship types for the purpose of statistical analysis; determining time windows to be used for historical data when establishing statistics for risk categories; and reviewing available statistical data. The Group will also consider the linkage between formal safety assessment (FSA) and GBS and consider the tier structure so far agreed for GBS for oil tankers and bulk carriers for use in the safety level approach.

Both groups will submit a report to MSC 83, scheduled for October 2007, which will also consider the report of the pilot project with the IACS CSR.

Measures to enhance maritime security
The MSC approved a circular on Interim Guidance on voluntary self assessment by Companies and company security officers (CSOs) for ship security.

The MSC also approved amendments to the Revised recommendations on the safe transport of dangerous cargoes and related activities in port areas (MSC/Circ.675), to include provisions intended to address the security of the transport of dangerous goods by sea.

It also approved amendments to the IMO/ILO/UNECE Guidelines for packing of cargo transport units (MSC/Circ.787) to broaden the scope of the guidelines to address the need for vigilance and the need for security procedures to be developed and followed by all concerned. The latter amendments will be forwarded to ILO and the UNECE for their consideration and approval.

Security of ships which do not fall within the scope of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code
The MSC began consideration of issues relating to the security aspects of the operation of ships which do not fall within the scope of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code (including cargo ships of less than 500 gross tonnage which travel on international routes).

The Committee agreed that non-SOLAS vessels shared the same operational environment as ships which fall within the scope of application of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code and the operations of the former affect the security of the latter. Thus, it was necessary to address the security aspects of the operation of non-SOLAS ships in a systematic and analytical manner, so as to achieve a tangible enhancement of the global security net which the provisions of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code were seeking to establish.

It was agreed also that any guidelines developed should be non mandatory and that their application should be under the purview of the individual Contracting Governments concerned and proportionate to the assessed levels of threat and risk.

A correspondence group was established to undertake a study to determine the scope of the issues and threats involved and to develop recommendatory guidelines on measures to enhance maritime security to complement measures required by SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code, which could be utilized by Contracting Governments and/or Administrations at their own discretion.

Security and facilitation issues related to the carriage of closed cargo transport units and of freight containers aboard ships
In relation to closed cargo transport units and containers, the Committee and the Facilitation Committee established a Joint MSC/FAL Working Group which met during the MSC session and began work on container and supply chain security, with a view to ensuring that the right balance is struck between enhanced security and the facilitation of maritime traffic. The Group, in its work, took into account the SAFE Framework of Standards to secure and facilitate global trade (the SAFE Framework of Standards) and the Authorized Economic Operator Guidelines, adopted by the World Customs Organization (WCO) in June 2005 and June 2006, respectively. The SAFE Framework of Standards was developed by WCO in response to a request from the 2002 SOLAS Conference which adopted SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code.

The Joint Working Group held initial discussions on the need to develop any relevant amendments to the SOLAS and/or FAL Conventions concerning closed cargo transport units and freight containers, to enhance maritime security whilst at the same time facilitating the movement of cargo. The MSC urged all member delegations and observers to consult with their experts in all aspects of the security and facilitation of maritime cargo and to submit their proposals on the security and facilitation of the movement of closed cargo transport units and of freight containers to the next session of the Facilitation Committee (FAL 34), for consideration by the next session of the joint MSC/FAL Working Group.

Long Range Identification and Tracking - technical specifications and guidelines
The MSC made progress on the development of the technical specifications of the components of the Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) System, including the technical specifications for the International LRIT Data Exchange, the International LRIT Data Centre and for communication within the LRIT System network; protocols for the development testing of the LRIT System and for the testing of the integration into the system of new LRIT data centres; and guidance on setting up and maintaining the Data Distribution Plan.

It was agreed that the ad hoc Working Group on engineering aspects of LRIT should be reconvened to further develop the draft technical specifications; update the required technical documents; prepare a technical costing and billing standard for LRIT; consider technical issues and develop technical criteria to be taken into account when establishing the International LRIT Data Centre and the International LRIT Data Exchange; liaise with the IMO Secretariat regarding consistency, security and other aspects of the Data Distribution Plan with the technical specifications; and ensure that the testing documents completely address the Performance Standards.

The Group is scheduled to meet in the week before the Sub-Committee on Radiocommunications, Search and Rescue (COMSAR 11, scheduled for 12-16 February 2007), and COMSAR was also instructed to consider issues relating to LRIT, particularly matters other than the specific engineering aspects.

In considering the role of performance review and audit of certain aspects of the LRIT system, the MSC appointed the International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO) as the LRIT Co ordinator.

The new regulation on LRIT, which is included in SOLAS chapter V on Safety of Navigation, was adopted at the last MSC session in May, along with related performance standards. LRIT will be introduced as a mandatory requirement for the following ships on international voyages: passenger ships, including high-speed craft; cargo ships, including high-speed craft, of 300 gross tonnage and upwards; and mobile offshore drilling units. If accepted by 1 July 2007, the regulation is expected to enter into force on 1 January 2008 and will apply to ships constructed on or after 31 December 2008 with a phased-in implementation schedule for ships constructed before 31 December 2008. LRIT is intended to be operational with respect to the transmission of LRIT information by ships as from 31 December 2008.

Role of the human element
The Joint MSC/MEPC Working Group on Human Element met during the session to consider human element issues.

Explosions on chemical and product carriers
The Group reviewed the report of the Inter-Industry Working Group (IIWG) and the Human Factors Task Group (HFTG), established to study the reported incidents of explosions on chemical and product carriers and agreed that it was difficult to draw conclusive analysis from existing casualty reports due to the lack of human element considerations during these investigations, such as investigators asking the relevant questions to determine if the human element was a contributing factor in the casualty. Nonetheless, the industry's review of its procedures and guidelines was a very positive step towards addressing the issue. Member States were urged to provide reports of casualty investigations to the Sub Committee on Flag State Implementation (FSI) expeditiously, with a view to arriving at constant and consistent analysis to ensure that such accidents and incidents do not recur.

It was agreed that there was a need to review and strengthen requirements for Dangerous Cargo Endorsements (DCEs) and proposals were invited with regards to the need for extending the requirements for DCEs to operational shore staff including terminal personnel and cargo surveyors. The Sub-Committee on Standards of Training and Watchkeeping (STW) was invited to review the requirements leading to DCEs for seafarers, under its agenda item "Comprehensive review of the STCW Convention and the STCW Code".

Impact of ISM Code
The Human Element Working Group also considered the report of the Group of Independent Experts (GIE) established by the Secretary-General to analyze the impact of the ISM Code and its effectiveness in the enhancement of safety of life at sea and protection of the marine environment.

The Committee agreed with the recommendations made by the GIE, in particular that: guidelines for Administrations should be revised to make them more effective and user-friendly; and guidelines and associated training should be developed to assist companies and seafarers in improving the implementation of the Code. It also agreed that the results of the study should be given wide publicity across the industry.

In discussing the GIE's conclusions, the MSC agreed that the paperwork that supports ISM compliance should be proportionate to the size, type and operation of the company; concise and user-friendly; and relevant to the operations related to safety and environmental protection.

The Committee noted that the industry had identified common areas between the ISM and ISPS Codes and that resolution A.852(20) on Guidelines for a structure of an integrated system of contingency planning for shipboard emergencies, may provide guidance to handle or manage common areas of the ISM and ISPS Codes.

It was noted that, in order to properly motivate seafarers, companies should take into account feedback from shipboard personnel, including the outcome of shipboard safety committees to improve their operations and procedures relating to safety and environmental protection and it was essential for the company to respond in a constructive and timely fashion to any feedback received from seafarers operating the safety management system (SMS). Since seafarers are integral to the effective operation of the SMS, they should, therefore, be involved in the development and improvement of the system in order to ensure that the manuals are proportionate, concise and relevant.

Near misses
The MSC agreed there was a need to encourage companies and seafarers to document and record information on near misses and hazardous situations in order to understand the precursors to events that were detrimental to safety and the marine environment. It invited Member Governments, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations in consultative status to submit proposals to the next session of the Joint MSC/MEPC Working Group on the Human Element, which is scheduled to be reconvened at MEPC 56 (9 to 13 July 2007).

Implementation of the revised STCW Convention
The list of Parties deemed to be giving full and complete effect to the provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, as amended, was updated when the Secretary-General submitted his report on those countries whose reports of independent evaluations had been completed since the previous MSC meeting.

The list of confirmed Parties to the STCW convention now has 117 Parties. (MSC.1/Circ.1164/Rev.2).

Other issues
The MSC considered other issues arising from the reports of Sub-Committees and other bodies, and:

  · adopted new and amended traffic separation schemes, including new and amended routeing measures other than traffic separation schemes, as well as new and amended mandatory ship reporting systems;
  · adopted revised performance standards for Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS). The aim behind the revision is to ensure the operational reliability of such equipment, taking into account technological progress and experience gained. The revised performance standards are more detailed than the current version and include references to newer equipment such as automatic identification systems. It is expected that the new revised performance standards would apply to ECDIS equipment installed on or after 1 January 2009;
  · adopted Performance Standards for shipborne Galileo Equipment Receiver valid for equipment installed on or after 1 January 2009;
  · adopted revised Guidelines for the design and construction of offshore supply vessels;
  · adopted amendments to the Guidelines for the transport and handling of limited amounts of hazardous and noxious liquid substances in bulk on offshore support vessels (LHNS Guidelines);
  · adopted amendments to the Code of safe carriage of cargoes and persons by offshore supply vessels (OSV Code);
  · adopted amendments to the Code of safe practice for the safe loading and unloading of bulk carriers (BLU Code); and
  · adopted revised Guidelines for the prevention and suppression of the smuggling of drugs, psychotropic substances and precursor chemicals on ships (previously resolution A.872(20)). The revised guidelines will be put forward to the Facilitation Committee for adoption at its next session.

Resolutions adopted

MSC.215(82) - Performance standard for protective coatings for dedicated seawater ballast tanks in all types of ships and double-side skin spaces of bulk carriers  
MSC.216(82) - Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended  
MSC.217(82) - Adoption of amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety systems (FSS Code)  
MSC.218(82) - Adoption of amendments to the International Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code  
MSC.219(82) - Adoption of amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code)  
MSC.220(82) - Adoption of amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code)  
MSC.221(82) - Adoption of amendments to the International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft, 1994 (1994 HSC code)  
MSC.222(82) - Adoption of amendments to the International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft, 2000 (2000 HSC Code)  
MSC.223(82) - Adoption of amendments to the Protocol of 1988 relating to the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966, as amended  
MSC.224(82) - Adoption of amendments to the Code of Safety for Dynamically Supported Craft, as amended  
MSC.225(82) - Adoption of amendments to the Code for the Construction and Equipment of ships carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk, as amended  
MSC.226(82) - Adoption of amendments to the revised recommendation on testing of life-saving appliances, as amended  
MSC.227(82) - Adoption of amendments to the Protocol of 1988 relating to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974  
MSC.228(82) - Revision of the Guidelines for the prevention and suppression of the smuggling of drugs, psychotropic substances and precursor chemicals on ships (Resolution A.872(20))  
MSC.229(82) - Adoption of new mandatory ship reporting system in the Galapagos particularly sensitive sea area (PSSA)  
MSC.230(82) - Adoption of amendments to the existing mandatory ship reporting system in the Storebælt (Great Belt) traffic area  
MSC.231(82) - Adoption of amendments to the existing mandatory ship reporting system in the Gulf of Finland  
MSC.232(82) - Adoption of the revised performance standards for electronic chart display and information system (ECDIS)  
MSC.233(82) - Adoption of the performance standards for shipborne Galileo receiver equipment  
MSC.234(82) - Recommendations concerning tonnage measurement of open-top containerships  
MSC.235(82 - Adoption of the Guidelines for the design and construction of offshore supply vessels, 2006  
MSC.236(82) - Adoption of amendments to the Guidelines for the transport and handling of limited amounts of hazardous and noxious liquid substances in bulk on offshore support vessels (Resolution A.673(16))  
MSC.237(82) - Adoption of amendments to the code of safe practice for the carriage of cargoes and persons by offshore supply vessels (OSV Code) (resolution A.863(20))  
MSC.238(82) - Adoption of amendments to the code of safe practice for the safe loading and unloading of bulk carriers (BLU Code) (resolution A.862(20))  

List of circulars and circular letters approved by MSC 82

MSC.1 circulars

MSC.1/Circ.1212 - Guidelines on alternative design and arrangements for SOLAS chapters II-1 and III  
MSC.1/Circ.1213 - Interpretation and application of the IGC Code for ships carrying liquefied carbon dioxide in bulk  
MSC.1/Circ.1214 - Performance standards for the systems and services to remain operational on passenger ships for safe return to port and orderly evacuation and abandonment after a casualty  
MSC.1/Circ.1215 - Early implementation of amendments to SOLAS chapter III and the International Life-Saving Appliances (LSA) Code  
MSC.1/Circ.1216 - Revised recommendations on the safe transport of dangerous cargoes and related activities in port areas  
MSC.1/Circ.1217 - Interim Guidance on voluntary self-assessment by Companies and company security officers (CSOs) for ship security  
MSC.1/Circ.797/Rev.14 - List of competent persons to be maintained by the Secretary-General pursuant to section A-I/7 of the STCW Code  
MSC.1/Circ.1163/Rev.1 - Parties to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, as amended, confirmed by the Maritime Safety Committee to have communicated information which demonstrates that full and complete effect is given to the relevant provisions of the Convention  
MSC.1/Circ.1164/Rev.2 - Promulgation of information related to reports of independent evaluation submitted by Parties to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, as amended, confirmed by the Maritime Safety Committee to have communicated information which demonstrates that Parties are giving full and complete effect to the relevant provisions of the Convention  
MSC.1/Circ.1218 - Guidance on exchange of medical information between telemedical assistance services involved in international SAR operations  
MSC.1/Circ.1219 - Interim LRIT Technical Specifications and other matters  
MSC.1/Circ.1220 - Voluntary structural guidelines for new ships carrying liquids in bulk containing benzene  
MSC.1/Circ.1221 - Validity of Type Approval Certification for Marine Products  
MSC.1/Circ.1222 - Guidelines on annual testing of voyage data recorders (VDR) and simplified voyage data recorders (S-VDR)  
MSC.1/Circ.1223 - Guidelines for pre-planning of surveys in dry-dock of ships which are not subject to the Enhanced programme of inspections  
MSC.1/Circ.1224 - Unified interpretations of SOLAS chapter V  
MSC.1/Circ.1225 - Navigational Warnings concerning operations endangering the Safety of Navigation  
MSC.1/Circ.1226 - Interim Explanatory Notes to the SOLAS chapter II-1 subdivision and damage stability regulations  
MSC.1/Circ.1227 - Explanatory Notes to the Interim Guidelines for alternative assessment of the weather criterion  
MSC.1/Circ.1228 - Revised Guidance to the master for avoiding dangerous situations in adverse weather and sea conditions  
MSC.1/Circ.1229 - Guidelines for the approval of stability instruments  
MSC.1/Circ.1230 Amendments to the manual on loading and unloading of solid bulk cargoes for terminal representatives  
MSC.1/Circ.1231 - Interim Scheme for the compliance of certain cargo ships and special purpose ships with the management for the safe operations of ships  
     
Joint MSC - MEPC circular    
MSC-MEPC.1/Circ.1 - Guidelines on the organization and method of work of the MSC, MEPC and their subsidiary bodies  
     
Other circulars    
COLREG.2/Circ.58 - New and amended traffic separation schemes  
SLS.14/Circ.115/Add.3 - Issue of Exemption Certificates under the 1974 SOLAS Convention and amendments thereto  
SN.1/Circ.257 - Routeing measures other than traffic separation schemes  
SN.1/Circ.258 - Mandatory ship reporting systems  
SN.1/Circ.259 Emergency wreck marking buoy  
     
Circular letters    
Circular letter No.1886/Rev.3 - Implementation of resolution A.600(15) - IMO ship identification number scheme  
Circular letter No.2554/Rev.1 -

Implementation of IMO Unique Company and Registered Owner Identification Number Scheme