Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), 81st session: 10-19 May 2006

LRIT
Adoption of amendments
Passenger ship safety - major work completed
Star Princess - fire regulations for balconies agreed
Prevention of accidents involving lifeboats
Maritime security - containers
Goal-based new ship construction standards
Review of the STCW Convention and the STCW Code
Review of Principles of safe manning
Consideration of human element issues in IMO's work
Assessment of the impact and effectiveness of implementation of the ISM Code
Adoption of new TSS, other routeing measures and ship reporting system
E-navigation
Protective coatings
Definition of bulk carrier
Explosions on tankers - inter-industry study
Implementation of the revised STCW Convention
Other issues
Resolutions adopted by the MSC
Circulars approved by MSC 81

LRIT
The MSC adopted new regulations for the LRIT together with associated performance standards and functional requirements.

The new regulation on LRIT is included in SOLAS chapter V on Safety of Navigation, through which LRIT will be introduced as a mandatory requirement for the following ships on international voyages: passenger ships, including high-speed craft; cargo ships, including high-speed craft, of 300 gross tonnage and upwards; and mobile offshore drilling units.

The SOLAS regulation on LRIT establishes a multilateral agreement for sharing LRIT information for security and search and rescue purposes, amongst SOLAS Contracting Governments, in order to meet the maritime security needs and other concerns of such Governments. It maintains the right of flag States to protect information about the ships entitled to fly their flag, where appropriate, while allowing coastal States access to information about ships navigating off their coasts. The SOLAS regulation on LRIT does not create or affirm any new rights of States over ships beyond those existing in international law, particularly, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), nor does it alter or affect the rights, jurisdiction, duties and obligations of States in connection with UNCLOS.

The LRIT information ships will be required to transmit include the ship's identity, location and date and time of the position. There will be no interface between LRIT and AIS. One of the more important distinctions between LRIT and AIS, apart from the obvious one of range, is that, whereas AIS is a broadcast system, data derived through LRIT will be available only to the recipients who are entitled to receive such information and safeguards concerning the confidentiality of those data have been built into the regulatory provisions. SOLAS Contracting Governments will be entitled to receive information about ships navigating within a distance not exceeding 1000 nautical miles off their coast.

The regulation foresees a phased-in implementation schedule for ships constructed before its expected entry into force date of 1 January 2008 and an exemption for ships operating exclusively in sea area A1 from the requirement to transmit LRIT information, since such ships are already fitted with AIS. It also identifies which authorities may have access to LRIT information.

The MSC also adopted performance standards and functional requirements for LRIT and an MSC resolution on Arrangements for the timely establishment of the long range identification and tracking system.

Adoption of amendments
The MSC adopted a number of other amendments to SOLAS and mandatory codes and guidelines with an expected entry into force date of 1 July 2010, except where indicated below.

Amendments to SOLAS Chapter II-2 - Fire protection
These include amendments relating to Regulation 9 - Containment of fire, so as to include a requirement for water-mist nozzles which should be tested and approved in accordance with the guidelines approved by the Organization; and in Regulation 15 - Arrangements for oil fuel, lubricating oil and other flammable oils, new text relating to the application of the regulation to ships constructed on or after 1 February 1992 and on or after 1 July 1998.

Amendments to SOLAS Chapter III - Life-saving appliances and arrangements
In Regulation 7 - Personal life-saving appliances, the amendments add a new requirement for infant lifejackets. For passenger ships on voyages of less than 24 hours, a number of infant lifejackets equal to at least 2.5% of the number of passengers on board is to be provided; and for passenger ships on voyages of 24 hours or greater, infant lifejackets are to be provided for each infant on board. A further amendment relates to the provision of lifejackets for larger passengers and states that, if the adult lifejackets provided are not designed to fit persons with a chest girth of up to 1,750 mm, a sufficient number of suitable accessories are to be available on board to allow them to be secured to such persons.

Amendments to SOLAS Chapter IV - Radiocommunications
The amendments relate to the provision of radio equipment, in Regulation 7, to require ships to carry an EPIRB capable of transmitting a distress alert through the polar orbiting satellite service (COSPAS-SARSAT) operating in the 406 MHz band; and, in Regulations 9 and 10, to clarify that the means of initiating ship-to-shore distress alerts may be through the Inmarsat geostationary satellite service by a ship earth station.

Amendments to SOLAS Chapter V - Safety of navigation
The amendment adds a new paragraph to Regulation 22 - Navigation bridge visibility to allow ballast water exchange at sea, provided that the master has determined that it is safe to do so and takes into consideration any increased blind sectors or reduced horizontal fields of vision resulting from the operation to ensure that a proper lookout is maintained at all times. The operation should be conducted in accordance with the ship's ballast water management plan, taking into account the recommendations on ballast water exchange. The commencement and termination of the operation should be recorded in the ship's record of navigational activities.

Amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code)
The amendments replace the text of Chapter 5 Fixed gas fire-extinguishing systems with a revised text.

Amendments to the International Life-Saving Appliance Code (LSA Code)
The amendments include the requirement that all life saving appliances should withstand in stowage an air temperature range of 30°C to +65°C and personal life-saving appliances should remain operational throughout an air temperature range of -15°C to +40°C. The colour of life-saving appliances is now specified to be "of international or vivid reddish orange, or a comparably highly visible colour on all parts where this will assist detection at sea". The existing section 2.2 on General requirements for lifejackets is revised and replaced. Further amendments relate to specifications for immersion suits and anti-exposure suits.

Amendments to Guidelines for the authorization of organizations acting on behalf of the Administration (Resolution A.739(18))
The amendments to the guidelines, which are mandatory under SOLAS chapter XI-1, add a new paragraph 2-1 to require the use of only exclusive surveyors and auditors for surveys and certification, although radio surveys may be subcontracted to non-exclusive surveyors.

Amendments to the STCW Convention and STCW Code
The amendments add new minimum mandatory training and certification requirements for persons to be designated as ship security officers (SSOs). The amendments to the STCW Convention and to parts A and B of the STCW Code include Requirements for the issue of certificates of proficiency for Ship Security Officers; Specifications of minimum standards of proficiency for ship security officers; and Guidance regarding training for Ship Security Officers.

Further amendments to part A of the STCW Code add additional training requirements for the launching and recovery of fast rescue boats. The amendments have been prepared in response to reports of injuries to seafarers in numerous incidents involving the launching and recovery of fast rescue boats in adverse weather conditions.

The anticipated entry into force date for the STCW amendments is 1 January 2008.

Amendments to the 1988 SOLAS Protocol
The amendments relate to surveys of structure, machinery and equipment of cargo ships, to require a minimum of two inspections of the outside of the ship's bottom during the five year period of validity of the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate or the Cargo Ship Safety Certificate, except in certain circumstances. The interval between any two such inspections should not exceed 36 months. The amendments to the 1988 SOLAS Protocol will be deemed to have been accepted on the date on which they are accepted by two-thirds of the Parties to the Protocol and will enter into force six months later.

Amendments to the IMDG Code
The amendments to the IMDG Code (Amendment 33-06) include those prepared on the basis of proposals received from Member Governments and Organizations and those prepared by the UN Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and on the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals. They relate to transport of Ethylene Oxide with Nitrogen up to a total pressure of 1 Mpa (10 bar) at 50oC (UN 1040); Polymeric beads (UN 2211); Plastics moulding compound (UN 3314); Ammonium Nitrate (UN 1942) and Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer (UN 2067); segregation provisions for class 8 acids and alkalis when not in limited quantities; and the packaging of articles containing dangerous goods in limited quantities. Governments are invited to apply the amendments on a voluntary basis from 1 January 2007, pending their entry into force date on 1 January 2008.

Passenger ship safety - major work completed
The MSC completed its major work programme item on passenger ship safety, which has based its guiding philosophy on the premise that the regulatory framework should place more emphasis on the prevention of a casualty from occurring in the first place and that future passenger ships should be designed for improved survivability so that, in the event of a casualty, persons can stay safely on board as the ship proceeds to port. The Working Group on Passenger Ship Safety was established to consider the work in detail and a number of amendments to the SOLAS Convention were approved for adoption at MSC 82 in November-December 2006.

It was noted that, with regard to the five pillars of the guiding philosophy for the Committee's passenger ship safety initiative, the following have been achieved since the work was initiated in 2000:

Prevention: Amendments to SOLAS and the STCW Conventions and supporting guidelines that focus on fire prevention, navigation safety, training and contingency planning.

Improved survivability: Amendments to SOLAS chapters II-1 and II-2 and supporting guidelines that focus on essential system redundancy, management of emergencies and casualty mitigation.

Regulatory flexibility: Amendments to SOLAS chapters II-1 and III and supporting guidelines that focus on promoting, through rigorous evaluation and approval procedures, the regulatory approval of new safety technologies and arrangements.

Operations in areas remote from SAR facilities: Action taken to develop amendments to SOLAS chapter III and supporting guidelines that will focus on reducing the time it takes to recover persons from survival craft and the water; supporting guidelines approved on external support from SAR Authorities, as well as guidance to assist seafarers taking part in SAR operations.

Health safety and medical care: Supporting guidelines that focus on establishing medical safety programmes and a revised Guide on Cold Water Survival.

The approved draft amendments to SOLAS chapters II-1, II-2 and III and the FSS Code relate to:

  • alternative designs and arrangements;
  • safe areas and the essential systems to be maintained while a ship proceeds to port after a casualty, which will require redundancy of propulsion and other essential systems;
  • on-board safety centres, from where safety systems can be controlled, operated and monitored;
  • fixed fire detection and alarm systems, including requirements for fire detectors and manually operated call points to be capable of being remotely and individually identified;
  • fire prevention, including amendments aimed at enhancing the fire safety of atriums, the means of escape in case of fire and ventilation systems; and time for orderly evacuation and abandonment, including requirements for the essential systems that must remain operational in case any one main vertical zone is unserviceable due to fire.
The MSC agreed that the Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Equipment (DE) should develop performance standards for recovery systems for all types of ships, by 2008, with a view to preparing further draft amendments to SOLAS chapter III on recovery arrangements for the rescue of persons at sea. The Committee agreed that the new amendments and guidelines should be enforced by 2012. The MSC also agreed that the Sub-Committee on Standards of Training and Watchkeeping (STW) should develop relevant training standards after the performance standards have been finalized. The idea is that ships should be equipped to recover persons from the water and/or survival craft and rescue craft, and give functional requirements for achieving this.

The following circulars were approved:

  • Guide to recovery techniques;
  • Guidelines on the provision of external support as an aid to incident containment for SAR Authorities and others concerned;
  • Enhanced contingency planning guidance for passenger ships operating in areas remote from SAR facilities, which includes Criteria for what constitutes an area remote from SAR facilities;
  • Guidelines on training of SAR service personnel working in major incidents; and
  • Guide for cold water survival.

A draft Assembly resolution on Guidelines on voyage planning for passenger ships operating in remote areas was agreed for submission to the next Assembly.

Further consequential work to be carried out includes the development of guidelines for the approval of novel life-saving appliances (DE); and guidelines on the lay-out and ergonomic design of safety centres on passenger ships (Sub-Committee on Safety of Navigation (NAV)).

The MSC also instructed the Sub-Committee on Stability, Load Lines and Fishing Vessel Safety (SLF) to consider draft amendments for water ingress detection and flooding level monitoring systems; and for a safe return to port capability for passenger ships in damaged condition. The STW Sub-Committee is instructed to review the guides for recovery techniques and cold water survival from the point of view of training.

Star Princess - fire regulations for balconies agreed
The MSC approved draft amendments to SOLAS chapter II-2 and the FSS Code to strengthen the fire protection arrangements in relation to cabin balconies on passenger vessels, in the wake of the fire aboard the cruise ship Star Princess.

The fire in March of this year aboard the Bermuda-registered cruise ship Star Princess, while on passage between Grand Cayman and Montego Bay, Jamaica, began on an external balcony and spread over several decks. The cause is currently being investigated by the UK's Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) on behalf of the Bermuda Maritime Administration in co-operation with United States' authorities. Although the investigation is not yet complete, the MAIB and the International Council of Cruise Lines (ICCL) issued a safety bulletin and a safety notice, respectively, which include urgent safety recommendations pertaining to the incident and a related paper was submitted to the MSC by the United Kingdom, which the Committee agreed to fast track.

The proposed draft amendments to SOLAS chapter II-2 are aimed at ensuring that existing regulations 4.4 (Primary deck coverings), 5.3.1.2 (Ceilings and linings), 5.3.2 (Use of combustible materials), 6 (Smoke generation potential and toxicity) are also applied to cabin balconies on new passenger ships.

For existing passenger ships, the MSC approved relevant provisions to require that furniture on cabin balconies be of restricted fire risk unless fixed water spraying systems, fixed fire detection and fire alarm systems are fitted and that partitions separating balconies be constructed of non combustible materials, similar to the provisions for new passenger ships.

The draft amendments will be circulated with a view to their adoption at MSC 82 in November-December this year.

It was agreed that the Sub-Committee on Fire Protection (FP) should review the fire safety of external areas on passenger ships and develop draft guidance for the approval of fixed water-spraying, fire detection and fire alarm systems for cabin balconies, taking into account that some existing passenger ships are already installing such systems in response to the Star Princess fire.

The MSC in the meantime agreed an MSC circular on Operational recommendations for passenger ships with cabin balconies. The circular recommends that the shipping industry implement a number of recommendations including increased vigilance such as the deployment of lookouts, fire patrols and television surveillance systems; passengers and crew should be advised not to leave towels and personal belongings on balconies; and passengers and crew should be reminded of the hazards associated with the use of unauthorized heating elements such as electrical heating coils used in cups or mugs and open flames such as candles.

Prevention of accidents involving lifeboats
The MSC approved for subsequent adoption a proposed draft amendment to SOLAS regulation III/19.3.3.4 concerning provisions for the launch of free-fall lifeboats during abandon-ship drills. The amendment will allow, during the abandon-ship drill, for the lifeboat to either be free-fall launched with only the required operating crew on board, or lowered into the water by means of the secondary means of launching without the operating crew on board, and then manoeuvred in the water by the operating crew. The aim is to prevent accidents with lifeboats occurring during abandon-ship drills.

Meanwhile, the MSC agreed an MSC circular on Early implementation of draft SOLAS regulation III/19.3.3.4; an MSC circular on Guidelines for developing operation and maintenance manuals for lifeboat systems and an MSC circular on Measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats consolidating previous circulars MSC/Circ.1049, MSC/Circ.1093, MSC/Circ.1136 and MSC/Circ.1137. The consolidated circular includes the Guidelines for periodic servicing and maintenance of lifeboats, launching appliances and on-load release gear; Guidance on safety during abandon-ship drills using lifeboats; and Guidelines for simulated launching of free-fall lifeboats.

Maritime security - containers
Following the adoption by the World Customs Organization (WCO) in June 2005 of the Framework of Standards to secure and facilitate global trade (the Framework of Standards), the MSC discussed the carriage of closed cargo transport units and of freight containers transported by ships and referred the matter to the Ship/Port Interface (SPI) Working Group, a working group of the Facilitation Committee which also reports to the MSC on relevant matters, for further consideration.

If appropriate, the SPI Working Group will develop draft amendments to the SOLAS Convention in order to enable port facilities and ships to accept closed cargo transport units and freight containers for carriage by ship, without the need for further security checks other than the maintenance of access controls, where the security of such consignments has been established through the application of security measures consistent with the Framework of Standards.

The SPI Working Group will also consider whether other IMO instruments and guidance should be amended to include provisions on supply chain security and facilitation.

Goal-based new ship construction standards
The MSC continued its work on developing goal-based standards (GBS) for new ship construction. The work has a five-tier structure: goals (Tier I), functional requirements (Tier II), verification of compliance criteria (Tier III), technical procedures and guidelines, classification rules and industry standards (Tier IV) and codes of practice and safety and quality systems for shipbuilding, ship operation, maintenance, training, manning, etc. (Tier V).

Intersessional work by a correspondence group was reviewed by the MSC and a GBS Working Group continued the work during the session. The work plan for GBS includes consideration of the probabilistic safety level methodology in the framework of GBS; completion of Tier II - functional requirements; development of Tier III - verification of compliance criteria; implementation of GBS; incorporation of GBS into IMO instruments; development of a ship construction file and consideration of the need for the development of a ship inspection and maintenance file; and consideration of the need to review consistency and adequacy of scope across the tiers.

In relation to GBS for bulk carriers and oil tankers, the MSC agreed Tier I goals and Tier II functional requirements, including a new requirement concerning recycling, with the proviso that these might need to be adjusted following completion of Tier III (verification of compliance).

In terms of Tier III, the MSC noted that the GBS working group proposed that the verification would be carried out by an expert group composed of independent experts nominated by Administrations according to their knowledge and expertise relevant to the subject under consideration. Tier III verification criteria would contain the information necessary to guide the group of experts to complete the verification of the classification society rules. Requests for verification could be submitted by a single classification society or by a group of classification societies.

In terms of incorporation of GBS in IMO instruments, there was general agreement that Tier I should be prepared in the form of amendments to SOLAS chapter II-1, whereas Tiers II and III could be included in a separate Code or a resolution, to be made mandatory under the SOLAS amendments. The Tier III process details as well as the Tier III verification guidelines could be footnoted as guidelines to be developed by the Organization so that they could be easily amended if necessary.

In considering the work outstanding in order to implement GBS for new ship construction for bulk carriers and oil tankers, it was agreed that carrying out a pilot project using the IACS Common Structural Rules (CSR) would be advantageous to help uncover issues that had not been discussed and resolved previously and to also determine what, if any, changes were needed. This pilot project should be completed before amending SOLAS.

The MSC established a correspondence group to progress work intersessionally and a second correspondence group to work on the safety level approach for developing GBS.

Review of the STCW Convention and the STCW Code
The MSC agreed that a comprehensive review of the STCW Convention and STCW Code is needed, in order to ensure that the Convention meets the new challenges facing the shipping industry including, but not limited to, rapid technological advances today and in the future. The MSC instructed the STW sub-Committee to define, as a first step, the issues to be reviewed and advise the MSC accordingly, before embarking on the actual work. A target completion date of 2008 was agreed.

Review of Principles of safe manning
The MSC also agreed the STW Sub-Committee should include a new work programme item on review of the principles for establishing the safe manning levels of ships, with a target completion date of 2008 and working in co-operation with the NAV Sub-Committee as necessary.

Consideration of human element issues in IMO's work
The report of the Joint MSC/MEPC Working Group on Human Element, which was reconvened during the fifty third session of the Marine Environment Protection Committee (18 to 22 July 2005) was considered. The MSC approved MSC/MEPC circulars on: checklist for considering human element issues by IMO bodies; strengthening of human element input to the work of IMO; framework for IMO consideration of ergonomics and work environment; and the Organization's strategy to address the human element, which includes a related action plan.

Assessment of the impact and effectiveness of implementation of the ISM Code
The MSC reviewed the report of a study on the impact and effectiveness of the ISM Code which was carried out by a Group of Independent Experts selected from administrations, organizations, academia and the shipping industry. Based on the data collected, the group concluded that where the ISM Code had been embraced as a positive step toward efficiency through a safety culture, tangible positive benefits were evident; and ISM Code compliance could be made easier through a reduction in the administrative process. The Group recommended that a further study should be undertaken, at a later date. The MSC agreed that the Human Element Working Group should further examine the report at its next meeting.

Adoption of new TSS, other routeing measures and ship reporting system
The MSC adopted a new traffic separation scheme (TSS) "The Canary Islands" and amendments to existing TSSs "In the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its approaches"; "Off Cabo de Gata"; "Off Porkkala Lighthouse"; and "In the Strait of Dover and Adjacent Waters". It also adopted routeing measures other than TSSs, namely new areas to be avoided in the Dover Strait and Canary Islands and a new mandatory ship reporting system for the Canary Islands. The new TSS, amendments to existing TSSs, routeing measures and mandatory reporting system should be implemented six months after their adoption, i.e. on 1 December 2006 at 0000 hours UTC.

E-navigation
The MSC decided to include, in the work programmes of the NAV and Radiocommunications and Search and Rescue (COMSAR) Sub-Committees, a high priority item on "Development of an e-navigation strategy", with a target completion date of 2008 and with the NAV Sub-Committee acting as co-ordinator. NAV 52, which meets in July 2006, was instructed to give preliminary consideration to this important topic.

The aim is to develop a strategic vision for e-navigation, to integrate existing and new navigational tools, in particular electronic tools, in an all-embracing system that will contribute to enhanced navigational safety (with all the positive repercussions this will have on maritime safety overall and environmental protection) while simultaneously reducing the burden on the navigator. As the basic technology for such an innovative step is already available, the challenge lies in ensuring the availability of all the other components of the system, including electronic navigational charts, and in using it effectively in order to simplify, to the benefit of the mariner, the display of the occasional local navigational environment. E-navigation would thus incorporate new technologies in a structured way and ensure that their use is compliant with the various navigational communication technologies and services that are already available, providing an overarching, accurate, secure and cost-effective system with the potential to provide global coverage for ships of all sizes.

Protective coatings
The MSC approved the Performance standard for protective coatings of dedicated seawater ballast tanks on all new ships and of double-side skin spaces of bulk carriers, for adoption by MSC resolution at the next session (MSC 82).

Draft amendments to SOLAS regulations II-1/3-2 and XII/6 concerning the mandatory performance standard for protective coatings were also approved, for future adoption. It was agreed that that the performance standard should apply to ships for which the building contract is placed on or after 1 July 2008; or in the absence of a building contract, the keels of which are laid on or after 1 January 2009, or the delivery of which is on or after 1 July 2012.

The MSC also approved an MSC circular on Application of SOLAS regulation XII/6.3 on corrosion prevention of double side skin spaces and dedicated seawater ballast tanks of bulk carriers and application of the performance standard for protective coatings for dedicated seawater ballast tanks on all new ships and double-side skin spaces of bulk carriers.

Definition of bulk carrier
The MSC approved an MSC circular on Interim Guidance on compliance of ships carrying dry cargoes in bulk with requirements of SOLAS chapters II-1, III, IX, XI-1 and XII. The guidance is intended to address the concern that, while a bulk carrier is identified through its Safety Construction and Safety Equipment Certificates and its Safety Management Certificate, the status of a ship which is not certified as a bulk carrier but nevertheless carries a cargo in bulk, might cause problems and be questioned by port State control (PSC) officers for non-compliance with SOLAS chapter XII. Meanwhile, the DE Sub-Committee was instructed to review recommendations of the Sub-Committee on Flag State Implementation (FSI) concerning the definition of bulk carriers and the approval for the carriage of dry cargoes in bulk and to report to MSC 83.

Explosions on tankers - inter-industry study
The MSC reviewed the report of the Inter-Industry Working Group (IIWG) which was established to study the reported incidents of explosions on chemical and product carriers. The IIWG had concluded that a failure to follow procedures was the primary cause of the incidents in question and a Human Factors Task Group, which is looking into ways of addressing this issue in the context of tankers, has been established by the IIWG. The IIWG recommended that, as an additional safety measure, the MSC give consideration to amending SOLAS to provide for the application of inert gas to new chemical tankers and new product tankers of less than 20,000 dwt.

The MSC referred the human element issues identified in the IIWG report to the joint MSC/MEPC Working Group on the Human Element and, noting the view that a formal safety assessment (FSA) study and cost/benefit analysis should be carried out before decisions are made, referred the issues related to the proposals on inert gas to the FP and DE Sub-Committees. The MSC also referred issues relating to ignition sources, also identified in the report as a problem, to the FP and DE Sub-Committees. Concerns about the availability of incident data were referred to the FSI Sub-Committee.

Implementation of the revised STCW Convention
The list of Parties deemed to be giving full and complete effect to the provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, as amended, was updated when IMO Secretary-General Efthimios Mitropoulos submitted his report on those countries whose reports of independent evaluations had been completed since the previous MSC meeting. The Committee confirmed that the procedures for the assessment of information provided had been correctly followed in respect of 24 STCW Parties and four overseas territories of another STCW Party.

Other issues
The MSC also agreed amendments to the 1994 and 2000 High-Speed Craft (HSC) Codes; amendments to the revised performance standards for shipborne voyage data recorders (VDRs) (resolution A.861(20)) and simplified voyage data recorders (S-VDRs) (resolution MSC.163(78)), for which carriage requirements enter into force on 1 July 2006; an MSC circular on Means of embarkation on and disembarkation from ships; an MSC/MEPC circular on IMO requirements on carriage of publications on board ships; and approved amendments to unified interpretations to SOLAS chapters II-1 and XII.

Resolutions adopted by the MSC

MSC.201(81) Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended
MSC.202(81) Adoption of amendments to SOLAS Chapter V - LRIT
MSC.203(81) Adoption of amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended
MSC.204(81) Adoption of amendments to the Protocol of 1988 relating to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended
MSC.205(81) Adoption of amendments to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code
MSC.206(81) Adoption of amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code)
MSC.207(81) Adoption of amendments to the International Life-Saving Appliances Code (LSA Code)
MSC.208(81) Adoption of amendments to the Guidelines for authorization of Organizations acting on behalf of the Administration (Resolution A.739(18)
MSC.209(81) Adoption of amendments to Part A of the Seafarers' Training, Certification and Watchkeeping Code (STCW Code)
MSC.210(81) Performance standards and functional requirements for the long-range identification and tracking of ships
MSC.211(81) Arrangements for the timely establishment of the long-range identification and tracking system
MSC.212(81) Adoption of amendments to the Bulk Chemical (BCH) Code
MSC.213(81) New mandatory ship reporting system
MSC.214(81) Amendments to the Revised performance standards for shipborne voyage data recorders (VDRs) (resolution A.861(20)) and simplified voyage data recorders (S-VDRs) (resolution MSC.163(78))

Circulars approved by MSC 81

MSC.1 circulars

MSC.1/Circ.1181 Amendments to the IAMSAR Manual
MSC.1/Circ.1182 Guide to recovery techniques
MSC.1/Circ.1183 Guidelines on the provision of external support as an aid to incident containment for SAR Authorities and others concerned
MSC.1/Circ.1184 Enhanced contingency planning guidance for passenger ships operating in areas remote from SAR facilities
MSC.1/Circ.1185 Guide for cold water survival
MSC.1/Circ.1186 Guidelines on training of SAR service personnel working in major incidents
MSC.1/Circ.1187 Operational recommendations for passenger ships with cabin balconies
MSC.1/Circ.1188 Guidelines on the training and certification of port facility security officers
MSC.1/Circ.1189 Interim scheme for the compliance of special purpose ships with the special measures to enhance maritime security
MSC.1/Circ.1190 Guidance on the provision of information for identifying ships when transmitting ship security alerts
MSC.1/Circ.1191 Reminder of the obligation to notify flag States when exercising control and compliance measures
MSC.1/Circ.1192 Guidance on voluntary self-assessment by SOLAS Contracting Governments and by port facilities
MSC.1/Circ.1193 Guidance on voluntary self-assessment by Administrations and for ship security
MSC.1/Circ.1194 Effective implementation of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code
MSC.1/Circ.1195 Guidelines for the conduct of high-speed craft model tests
MSC.1/Circ.1196 Means of embarkation on and disembarkation from ships
MSC.1/Circ.1197 Amendments to unified interpretations to SOLAS chapters II-1 and XII approved by MSC.Circ.1176
MSC.1/Circ.1198 Application of SOLAS regulation XII/6.3 on corrosion prevention of double-side skin spaces and dedicated seawater ballast tanks of bulk carriers and application of the performance standard for protective coatings for dedicated seawater ballast tanks on all new ships and double-side skin spaces of bulk carriers
MSC.1/Circ.1199 Interim Guidance on compliance of ships carrying dry cargoes in bulk with requirements of SOLAS chapters II-1, III, IX, XI-1 and XII
MSC.1/Circ.1060/Add.1 Amendment to the Guidance note on the preparation of proposals on ships' routeing systems and ship reporting systems for submission to the Sub-Committee on Safety of Navigation (MSC/Circ.1060)
MSC.1/Circ.1200 Interim Guidelines for alternative assessment of the weather criterion
MSC.1/Circ.1201 Contact information for the designated competent authority
MSC.1/Circ.1202 Inspection programmes for cargo transport units carrying dangerous goods
MSC.1/Circ.1025/Add.1 Amendments to the revised EmS Guide
MSC.1/Circ.1203 Unified interpretations to SOLAS chapter II-2 and the fire test procedures referred to in the FTP Code
MSC.1/Circ.1204 Early application of amendment to SOLAS regulation II-2/4.5.2.3
MSC.1/Circ.1205 Guidelines for developing operation and maintenance manuals for lifeboat systems
MSC.1/Circ.1206 Measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats
MSC.1/Circ.1207 Early implementation of draft SOLAS regulation III/19.3.3.4
MSC.1/Circ.1208 Promoting and verifying continued familiarization of GMDSS operators on board ships
MSC.1/Circ.1209 Information on simulators available for use in maritime training
MSC.1/Circ.1164/Rev.1 Promulgation of information related to reports of independent evaluation submitted by Parties to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, confirmed by the Maritime Safety Committee to have communicated information which demonstrates that Parties are giving full and complete effect to the relevant provisions of the Convention
MSC.1/Circ.797/Rev.13 Competent persons nominated by Governments
MSC.1/Circ.1210 COSPAS-SARSAT International 406 MHz Beacon Registration Database
MSC.1/Circ.1211 Unified interpretations to SOLAS regulation II-1/10 and regulation 12 of the revised SOLAS chapter II-1 regarding bow doors and the extension of the collision bulkhead

Joint MSC - MEPC circulars

MSC-MEPC.2/Circ.1 Disposal of fumigants
MSC-MEPC.2/Circ.2 IMO requirements on carriage of publications on board ships
MSC-MEPC.2/Circ.3 Guidelines on the basic elements of a shipboard occupational health and safety programme
MSC-MEPC.2/Circ.4 Early application of the amendments to the fire protection requirements of the IBC Code
MSC-MEPC.7/Circ.1 Checklist for considering human element issues by IMO bodies
MSC-MEPC.7/Circ.2 Strengthening of human element input to the work of IMO
MSC-MEPC.7/Circ.3 Framework for consideration of ergonomics and work environment
MSC-MEPC.7/Circ.4 Organization's strategy to address the human element

Other circulars

STCW.6/Circ.9 Amendments to part B of the STCW Code relating to the certificate of proficiency for ship security officer
STCW.6/Circ.10 Amendments to part B of the STCW Code relating to guidance on familiarization and training for seafarers serving on board ships fitted with free-fall lifeboats
COLREG.2/Circ.57 New and amended traffic separation schemes, and associated routeing measures
SN.1/Circ.253 Routeing measures other than traffic separation scheme
SN.1/Circ.254 New mandatory ship reporting system for the Canary Islands (as associated protective measures for the Canary Islands PSSA)